Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
PurpleDawg

The TCU Variety Thread

Recommended Posts

20 minutes ago, crunch said:

How many guys get Eq schollies?  It's a Title IX boondoggle.  

I think TCU started it in an attempt to comply with Title IX. The rifle team has existed for a long time, though, and it's all ladies as well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Boston Frog said:

I think TCU started it in an attempt to comply with Title IX. The rifle team has existed for a long time, though, and it's all ladies as well. 

 

 

Rifle is a co-ed sport.  We just happen to be an exclusively female squad.

 


Equestrian is 15 scholarships - basically its our offset for baseball (11.7) - and rifle 3.6 scholarships.  Both are equivalency sports - our equestrian grants are split between 41 females, rifle splits them between 10 females.  So in both cases doesnt exactly provide a free ride.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Longtime ties brought Jeremiah Donati to TCU

 

While the naming of Jeremiah Donati to TCU athletics came as a surprise to some, he’s been learning about college athletics under former athletic director Chris Del Conte for more than 20 years. In fact, their longtime friendship was what first brought Donati to Fort Worth in 2011.

 

After Del Conte was named athletic director at the University of Texas at Austin in December, TCU quickly tapped Donati to take over the job.

Donati said he’s thankful for Del Conte’s mentorship and making him go beyond what his job entailed.

 

“Chris always put more on my plate than what my job responsibilities suggested,” Donati said. “I was always doing more than what the HR department would tell you I’m here to do, and I’m forever indebted to him for that.”

 

The friendship between Donati and Del Conte extends well beyond their professional lives– their families have been tied for decades.

 

“When Jeremiah’s father was passing away a few years ago, his last conversation with me was to say make sure you take care of my boy,” Del Conte said. “I was happy to do that, but I haven’t taken care of Jeremiah– he’s taken care of me my whole life… He’s one of the greatest individuals I personally know. I love him dearly.”

 

TCU Chancellor Victor Boschini said Donati’s work at TCU speaks for itself.

 

“[Donati was the] first and only choice just because I’ve watched him over the past five or six years,” Boschini said. “I’ve seen him grow and develop the skills necessary to do the jobs. He’s a great people-person. He knows athletics. He’s a good fundraiser and friend-raiser.”

 

Donati’s first conversation with Del Conte came at age 12 when Donati’s father took him to watch his friend Robert Del Conte’s son, Chris, do high jump at a track meet at Washington State.

 

“He was this ball of energy coming at me,” Donati said. “I didn’t know this guy, but he knew my dad from his time on the ranch. He puts me in a headlock– first interaction– and immediately develops a nickname for me, ‘J-Man,’ which to this day he still calls me.”

 

The Ranch

Del Conte’s family ran a children’s home on a 147-acre ranch in Taos, New Mexico. Robert Del Conte met Donati’s father, Dr. Richard Donati, when he just out of medical school and looking for a place to stay. Robert Del Conte invited Richard Donati to live at the ranch in exchange for providing basic medical care for the foster children.

 

“My dad jumped at the chance,” Donati said.

 

Donati’s father would later become team doctor for Washington State and the University of Idaho.

 

When Chris Del Conte was looking into graduate school programs, he contacted Dr. Donati.

 

Dr. Donati helped Del Conte get a graduate assistant position in Washington State’s athletic department.

 

That’s when “J-Man,” who was in high school, and Chris grew close.

 

“Chris is nine years older than me,” Donati said. “He’s always been like an older brother– at least  when we were that age.”

 

As Del Conte moved up in his career, he always made a way for Donati.

 

“He goes off and gets his first job at Cal Poly,” Donati said. “He hired me for summers where I would come down and work in the development and marketing office.”

 

When Del Conte moved on to the University of Arizona with Livengood, Donati followed.

 

“Chris was there for seven or eight years, and I went to work for Chris during the summers when I was in law school down there and really started cutting my teeth in the business of college athletics,” Donati said.

 

They parted when Donati graduated from law school and became an NFL agent under Leigh Steinberg, but the family ties remained.

“I would see Chris every so often,” Donati said. “Our families remained close. His family lived in Southern California, so he would come to visit them… I lived in Southern California so I would go visit them every once in a while.”

 

When Del Conte wanted to leave Rice to become the athletic director at TCU, Donati helped him work out his contract.

 

“Ironically, I became his agent,” Donati said.

 

The Recruitment

Once Del Conte was settled at TCU, he started wooing Donati. The first time Donati turned him down was in 2010.

 

“I was a member of the California Bar Association,” Donati said. “I had all the juices in the world. It’s not going to work.”

 

Del Conte didn’t give up.

 

“Chris called me and said, ‘Look, I need someone here who understands me and gets me, would you consider coming down here?’” Donati said.

 

The last time Del Conte called was in 2011 and the NFL was facing a lockout with the Player’s Association.

 

“Finally he goes, ‘Look, I’m not going to ask you again, just get your butt down here and check it out. If you don’t like it, I won’t bother you anymore,’” Donati said.

 

Donati arrived in Fort Worth shortly after the Horned Frogs beat Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl.

 

Even though Amon G. Carter Stadium had just been imploded and the Horned Frogs were still in the Mountain West, Donati said he was hopeful for TCU’s future.

 

“I thought to myself, this would be the perfect place to start over,” Donati said. “To speak and to work with a guy like Chris– and just the basic interactions I had with the chancellor and Coach Patterson– [I thought] this would be the ideal place to start.”

 

Although Del Conte and Donati are now rivals, neither expects their relationship to change.

 

“I’ll rely on his advice because he sat in that chair for nine years,” Donati said. “But he and I are very competitive with each other and that’s not going to go anywhere. Now that he’s at Texas and I’m at TCU, we’ll take that to another level; but we’ll always have a love and bond that goes beyond an employer-employee type of relationship.”

https://www.tcu360.com/2018/02/longtime-ties-brought-jeremiah-donati-to-tcu/

  • Like (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, DirtyThirdFrog said:

Little sis has her Audition on Saturday for the fine arts dept. 

Fingers crossed! She'll ace it, though. This is where she's auditioning for a scholarship?

  • Like (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ADJD sits down with Estridge tonight at 6pm for a one-on-one. Should be interesting.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Defender first TCU soccer player be drafted into the National Women’s Soccer League

 

For the first time in program history, a TCU soccer player has been drafted into the National Women’s Soccer League. TCU defender Ryan Williams was selected 40th overall by the North Carolina Courage.

 

“When they called my name it was completely unexpected,” Williams said. “I had no idea. I’m still in shock honestly, but I’m really excited.”

Williams doesn’t know exactly what her plans are for the future, but she said playing professional soccer will be beneficial in the long run– even if it wouldn’t be the most lucrative.

 

While the league doubled its minimum salary from $7,200 per season to $15,000 for the 2017 season, it’s still only $4,000 above the reported 2016 poverty line. Luckily, Williams says the next level isn’t about the salary.

 

“It’s always been about soccer for me,” Williams said. “I just love it and I’m not ready to give it up yet.”

 

Williams said she couldn’t have done it without the effort and support from her coaches.

 

“My coaches sent out my highlight video to get me drafted,” Williams said. “Without them, I don’t think I would have made it this far.”

 

Williams will continue to practice individually and with her teammates until the North Carolina Courage starts training camp Feb. 18.

https://www.tcu360.com/2018/02/defender-first-tcu-soccer-player-be-drafted-into-the-national-womens-soccer-league/

 

  • Upvote (+1) 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a friend whose daughter plays in NWSL, and one of the Breakers (RIP) players trained with Greater Lowell United. The league ... does not pay. Still a great accomplishment. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram is reporting that TCU head coach Sam Busch has resigned after 6 months leading the program. Busch was placed on administrative leave 2 weeks ago while the athletic department “conducted an internal inquiry into program rules, policy and procedure violations.”

 

The school has not confirmed the exact reason for the investigation, but on Friday the school’s athletic director Jeremiah Donati did send a statement to the paper. “Coach Busch cooperated with our internal inquiry,” Donati said in the release. “After reviewing the facts with us, he decided to resign. I have accepted his resignation, and we wish him the best in his future coaching endeavors.”

 

Assistant coach Keith Dawley has been appointed to lead the team to the Big 12 Championships that begin this Wednesday in Austin.

https://swimswam.com/sam-busch-resigns-as-tcu-swimming-head-coach/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TCU Takes the Lead on Enhancing Health Care

Can leadership be taught? We think it can.

If you were to walk down the corridors of any hospital in Fort Worth while wearing a Texas Christian University shirt, chances are you’d be greeted by a knowing smile, a hand sign and an enthusiastic “Go Frogs” from many people.

 

That’s because TCU is more than everyone’s favorite hometown team to cheer on; TCU has become a popular presence and valued partner to our area health care institutions. For many years, the university has enjoyed affiliations with North Texas hospitals through students from the Harris College of Nursing & Health Sciences and the TCU Pre-Health Professions Institute. And the formation of the TCU and UNTHSC School of Medicine is an exciting new chapter in our university’s story.

 

TCU’s Neeley School of Business also is playing a part in improving the future of medicine. When administrators at Fort Worth’s Cook Children’s Health Care System and John Peter Smith Health Network sought out ways to better prepare their professional employees for leadership, both institutions turned to TCU. The business school’s innovative programs have been a perfect fit to help physicians and other health care staff live up to their fullest potential.

 

TCU Neeley Executive Education offers a slate of courses not found in any medical school toolbox: negotiation, design thinking, communication and other forms of problem-solving. Through classes and small project groups, hospital personnel have rediscovered the power of ideas. TCU is helping these health care professionals learn to step up as leaders at their respective institutions and gain a better understanding of how their contributions relate to the nation’s health care system.

 

The results of Neeley’s partnership with the two health care systems have been eye-opening for the leadership participants and positive for all involved. Physicians have discovered new ways of thinking and relating, reacting with surprising enthusiasm about giving up Saturdays in their already full schedules. This excitement is a heartening reminder of the value of a liberal arts education, where connecting different areas of study makes learning a lifelong adventure.

 

Can leadership be taught? Read the Business of Medicine story, and we think you will agree that it can. And that there’s no better place to learn about leadership than at TCU.

 

With great pride, I have yet another reason to say this: Lead On, Horned Frogs!

Victor J. Boschini, Jr.
v.boschini@tcu.edu

https://magazine.tcu.edu/winter-2018/tcu-takes-lead-enhancing-health-care/

  • Upvote (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/7/2018 at 9:53 AM, PurpleDawg said:

Fingers crossed! She'll ace it, though. This is where she's auditioning for a scholarship?

 

She got in. Heard on Saturday. Yeah this for additional scholarship. She already got a $13k/ year one. 

 

She loves TCU so much she canceled her SMU audition. I’m a proud big brother 

  • Like (+1) 2
  • Upvote (+1) 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, DirtyThirdFrog said:

 

She got in. Heard on Saturday. Yeah this for additional scholarship. She already got a $13k/ year one. 

 

She loves TCU so much she canceled her SMU audition. I’m a proud big brother 

Great to hear! SMU School of Music is crap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, PurpleDawg said:

Great to hear! SMU School of Music is crap.

 

Surely it's expensive.  Doesn't that make it good?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, froginaustin said:

 

Surely it's expensive.  Doesn't that make it good?

That's what they think, apparently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, DirtyThirdFrog said:

 

She got in. Heard on Saturday. Yeah this for additional scholarship. She already got a $13k/ year one. 

 

She loves TCU so much she canceled her SMU audition. I’m a proud big brother 

Awesome! Congratulations to your sister. Is she officially a Frog, then? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, froginaustin said:

 

Surely it's expensive.  Doesn't that make it good?

SMU and Dallas deserve each other. All hat and no cattle. 

  • Like (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Boston Frog said:

Awesome! Congratulations to your sister. Is she officially a Frog, then? 

 

Her Instagram says TWHS '18 TCU'22... so in 18 year old speak, that is pretty official I think.

  • Haha  (+1) 1
  • Upvote (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, DirtyThirdFrog said:

 

Her Instagram says TWHS '18 TCU'22... so in 18 year old speak, that is pretty official I think.

No emojis? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Boston Frog said:

No emojis? 

 

I think she's too cool for those. Or something. Idk... I'm a pretty unhip 31 year old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, DirtyThirdFrog said:

 

I think she's too cool for those. Or something. Idk... I'm a pretty unhip 31 year old.

Try being 44

  • Haha  (+1) 1
  • Upvote (+1) 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Boston Frog said:

SMU and Dallas deserve each other. All hat and no cattle. 

 

I read a catalogue for SMU's music school years ago (I can''t remember why I was bothering to read it) that said in its mission statement, and I paraphrase, SMU's music school is organized and teaches on the "conservatory principal".

 

Yeah.  Right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...