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FrogAbroad

My friendly neighborhood volcano

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Fuego is about 20 miles from my house and once again is acting out.  If I got on my roof possibly I might see it over the trees and buildings between here and there.

 

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In some of the towns closer to Fuego they're hearing almost constant rumbling from the movement of the magma.  I've felt no tremors here but I won't be surprised when it happens.

 

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Is the ash coming your way? Can you seal your home if there is a major eruption or will the lava make that a moot point?

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Is the ash coming your way? Can you seal your home if there is a major eruption or will the lava make that a moot point?

 

Not a lot of ash so far but it's being moved away from me by the prevailing winds.  The area right around Fuego is getting significant ash, of course, and evacuations are underway...a normal part of life for those folks.

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The volcano's at it again.  It's always active, to a greater or lesser degree, but within the last couple of days it's more "greater" than "lesser."

 

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CceGb5PUMAAYG_0.jpg

 

Photos and text being tweeted on a very real-time basis right now...cut and paste "Volcán de Fuego" [including " "] into the Twitter search box if you're interested.

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8 minutes ago, FrogAbroad said:

The volcano's at it again.  It's always active, to a greater or lesser degree, but within the last couple of days it's more "greater" than "lesser."

 

Ccd9qniUsAAtTW4.jpg

 

CceGb5PUMAAYG_0.jpg

 

Photos and text being tweeted on a very real-time basis right now...cut and paste "Volcán de Fuego" [including " "] into the Twitter search box if you're interested.

Are you keeping a horse saddled and ready?

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The alert has been elevated to "Orange" and extended for another 48 hours.  Fuego may well shut down the international airport before the week's over...

 

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I haven't followed along yet on Twitter, FA, or elsewhere. Are you in danger of needing to evacuate? Do you have Brindi's travel suite ready to go?

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Thanks for the concern... Ms Brindi and I are safe and far away from red-hot lava.  Now, if there's a major earthquake like in 1976...

 

The present situation sort of reminds me of my grandmother's pressure cooker.  She used it frequently to quickly cook tough cuts of meat and dried beans she forgot to soak overnight before cooking.  She'd put the uncooked food in the cooker, add a bit of water, close the lid and put the little pressure weight on top.  When it jiggled she'd turn down the heat and let the pressure cooker do its thing.  But one time she forgot to turn down the heat and the pressure cooker overheated, blew out the safety plug and sprayed a whole mess of green beans on the kitchen ceiling.

 

Well, right now Volcán de Fuego is jiggling, letting off some excess heat and steam and pressure.  As long as the plug doesn't blow out everything's copacetic.

 

If the plug does blow out be sure to catch it on Twitter or YouTube, 'cause it'll be one more spectacular show.

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On March 3, 2016 at 1:40 PM, FrogAbroad said:

Thanks for the concern... Ms Brindi and I are safe and far away from red-hot lava.  Now, if there's a major earthquake like in 1976...

 

The present situation sort of reminds me of my grandmother's pressure cooker.  She used it frequently to quickly cook tough cuts of meat and dried beans she forgot to soak overnight before cooking.  She'd put the uncooked food in the cooker, add a bit of water, close the lid and put the little pressure weight on top.  When it jiggled she'd turn down the heat and let the pressure cooker do its thing.  But one time she forgot to turn down the heat and the pressure cooker overheated, blew out the safety plug and sprayed a whole mess of green beans on the kitchen ceiling.

 

Well, right now Volcán de Fuego is jiggling, letting off some excess heat and steam and pressure.  As long as the plug doesn't blow out everything's copacetic.

 

If the plug does blow out be sure to catch it on Twitter or YouTube, 'cause it'll be one more spectacular show.

Volcanology isn't my speciality, but I always found it as one of the more interesting aspects of geology. I've always wanted to witness an eruption event in person. Hopefully those pyroclastic flows aren't too nasty. I did read that activity has started to normalize today after the flux of ash.

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23 minutes ago, SuperToad said:

Volcanology isn't my speciality, but I always found it as one of the more interesting aspects of geology. I've always wanted to witness an eruption event in person. Hopefully those pyroclastic flows aren't too nasty. I did read that activity has started to normalize today after the flux of ash.

 

Yep, things at Volcán Fuego are dying down as hoped and as was expected to eventually happen.

 

A few years back some of my work colleagues visiting from the US wanted to see one of our local volcanoes up close, so I arranged for them to have an evening tour of Volcán Pacaya, which at that time was more active than Fuego.  They got to the rim, looked over to see the orange-red glow of the lava and feel the heat and smell the sulfur, and were generally impressed.  Somehow they even found a bag of marshmallows in Antigua and toasted some over a small exposed and still-glowing lava flow. Overall they had a great time, although one guy's rubber-soled shoes were considerably melted by the time he got back to the van.

 

In these parts, Pacaya would be a better place to witness an eruption.  It's more Hawaiian, with relatively calm flows of lava without a lot of strombolian activity.  Fuego is rather the opposite and its volcanic light shows are much more spectacular.

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1 hour ago, Boston Frog said:

FA, why do you live in Guatemala? 

 

Since 1978 I've lived outside the USA...in Colombia, Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala.  It's all been job-related: accounting, finance, banking, organizational administration, auditing.  In 1991 I was invited to leave overseas assignments and relocate to VA, but I realized I'm a field guy, not a home-office guy.  In 2013 I was again offered a home-office assignment but...naah...overseas field work is what I prefer.  So now my work area includes Central and South America, Southeast Asia, Middle East, North Africa, Western Europe...I get around.  Basically I like it here.  After so many years in Latin America I fit in better here than in most of the USA.  I like the work, like the people, like the region.

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3 hours ago, FrogAbroad said:

 

Since 1978 I've lived outside the USA...in Colombia, Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala.  It's all been job-related: accounting, finance, banking, organizational administration, auditing.  In 1991 I was invited to leave overseas assignments and relocate to VA, but I realized I'm a field guy, not a home-office guy.  In 2013 I was again offered a home-office assignment but...naah...overseas field work is what I prefer.  So now my work area includes Central and South America, Southeast Asia, Middle East, North Africa, Western Europe...I get around.  Basically I like it here.  After so many years in Latin America I fit in better here than in most of the USA.  I like the work, like the people, like the region.

What type of organization do you work for? I wasn't aware that Guatemala had an economy 

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Another day, another volcano...but this one isn't quite as close to my house as was Fuego...

 

 

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33 minutes ago, PurpleDawg said:

He looks annoyed. How close to you?

 

About 80 miles, if the crow flies in a straight line. If the crow is driving it's more like 125 miles, 4½ hours more or less through some really nice mountains.

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Wow thats crazy. I was recently in Italy and being so close to Mt Vesuvius and Mt Etna was just too eerie for me.

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1 hour ago, PurpleDawg said:

He looks annoyed. How close to you?

 

Speaking of the Ring of Fire and you, I ran across this little horror story the other day.  It's a year old so you might have seen it already, but if you haven't, move uphill, woman ...

 

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/07/20/the-really-big-one

 

When the next very big earthquake hits, the northwest edge of the continent, from California to Canada and the continental shelf to the Cascades, will drop by as much as six feet and rebound thirty to a hundred feet to the west—losing, within minutes, all the elevation and compression it has gained over centuries. Some of that shift will take place beneath the ocean, displacing a colossal quantity of seawater. (Watch what your fingertips do when you flatten your hand.) The water will surge upward into a huge hill, then promptly collapse. One side will rush west, toward Japan. The other side will rush east, in a seven-hundred-mile liquid wall that will reach the Northwest coast, on average, fifteen minutes after the earthquake begins. By the time the shaking has ceased and the tsunami has receded, the region will be unrecognizable. Kenneth Murphy, who directs FEMA’s Region X, the division responsible for Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Alaska, says, “Our operating assumption is that everything west of Interstate 5 will be toast.”

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