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http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2014/07/19/why-hospital-ceos-are-impatiently-waiting-for-the.aspx

 

I think some folks were expecting a rush on services. I think the structure of the plans is such that people weren't getting the feeling that they were getting free health care amd did not rush to use it.

 

This suggests to me that premiums might be driven down over time as the forecasts that underpinned the rates are replaced with data. 

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I can't imagine the rates would go down. That doesn't sound like the market we've all come to know.

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http://www.forbes.com/sites/brucejapsen/2014/07/20/hospitals-see-troubles-in-red-states-that-snubbed-obamacares-medicaid-deal/?partner=yahootix

 

Hospitals in red states that declined to expand Medicaid are losing out. What that means is that our democratic process is about to take effect.

 

For those of you who are not cynical enough, let me explain the process. What will happen now is that the hospitals will give lots of money or threaten to withhold lots of money from politicians until they get in on the gravy train. Then the politicians will find some way to blame it on the devil (Obama) made them do it. 

 

And all the people making money from drug sales, hospitals, and insurance will still squawk about how government prevents them from doing a better job cheaper so they can shift the blame for anything and everything to government. 

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http://www.forbes.com/sites/brucejapsen/2014/07/20/hospitals-see-troubles-in-red-states-that-snubbed-obamacares-medicaid-deal/?partner=yahootix

Hospitals in red states that declined to expand Medicaid are losing out. What that means is that our democratic process is about to take effect.

For those of you who are not cynical enough, let me explain the process. What will happen now is that the hospitals will give lots of money or threaten to withhold lots of money from politicians until they get in on the gravy train. Then the politicians will find some way to blame it on the devil (Obama) made them do it.

And all the people making money from drug sales, hospitals, and insurance will still squawk about how government prevents them from doing a better job cheaper so they can shift the blame for anything and everything to government.

Not true. Medicaid is very expensive, and States are required to balance their budgets. In several years, we will see lots of states bankrupted due to Medicaid expansions. The Feds are only going to cover it at 100% levels for a very short time then they drop to 90%. As well, most docs can't afford to take Medicaid so what good will it do to have it if you can't see a doctor?

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Not true. Medicaid is very expensive, and States are required to balance their budgets. In several years, we will see lots of states bankrupted due to Medicaid expansions. The Feds are only going to cover it at 100% levels for a very short time then they drop to 90%. As well, most docs can't afford to take Medicaid so what good will it do to have it if you can't see a doctor?

 

Does that make total sense to you? 

 

Doctors don't take Medicaid...so it costs a lot? How?

 

States will go bankrupt over 10%. Shouldn't the economic activity in their state and the economic relief for public hospitals be worth something to offset that?

 

This reminds me of Bowlsby speak. 

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Does that make total sense to you? 

 

Doctors don't take Medicaid...so it costs a lot? How?

 

States will go bankrupt over 10%. Shouldn't the economic activity in their state and the economic relief for public hospitals be worth something to offset that?

 

This reminds me of Bowlsby speak.

We pay for the insurance which costs a lot, the reimbursement rates are so low so doctors won't take--so we spend a lot of money for nothing. Pretty simple, really.

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We pay for the insurance which costs a lot, the reimbursement rates are so low so doctors won't take--so we spend a lot of money for nothing. Pretty simple, really.

 

Who does Medicaid pay the money to if no one accepts that insurance? If the money is not used for service, where does it go?

 

It really doesn't matter. My point is that if the hospitals and businesses see a pot of money they are losing out on, they will lobby to get in on it. 

 

The only things that happen in this country are things that bring profit to a concentrated few. 

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We pay for the insurance which costs a lot, the reimbursement rates are so low so doctors won't take--so we spend a lot of money for nothing. Pretty simple, really.

It does go to service.  True, many private doctors will not accept it, but that just funnels patients to the public hospitals and clinics.  Leslie is on medicaid and receives her fully paid medical services (including doctors visits, specialists, tests and lab) thru JPS, the public hospital and clinics in Tarrant County (Fort Worth) and thru the county MHMR.  Service is not the greatest but is usually adequate.   And her medications which likely total several thousand dollars per month are fully covered by medicaid.

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Who does Medicaid pay the money to if no one accepts that insurance? If the money is not used for service, where does it go?

 

It really doesn't matter. My point is that if the hospitals and businesses see a pot of money they are losing out on, they will lobby to get in on it. 

 

The only things that happen in this country are things that bring profit to a concentrated few.

It's insurance. If you don't use your insurance, you don't get your money back.

In this case, these folks will probably go to the ER.

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I believe if you look at Arkansas' medicaid expansion you can see the risks that states have.  There expansion plan, called the "Private Option" has run a deficit every month of operation and now the state is asking for a federal bailout.

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It's insurance. If you don't use your insurance, you don't get your money back.

In this case, these folks will probably go to the ER.

 

Who gets it then? 

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I believe if you look at Arkansas' medicaid expansion you can see the risks that states have.  There expansion plan, called the "Private Option" has run a deficit every month of operation and now the state is asking for a federal bailout.

 

That's another kettle of fish. Certainly not standard Medicaid. I think it is an attempt to run Medicaid at least partially through private insurance. 

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That's another kettle of fish. Certainly not standard Medicaid. I think it is an attempt to run Medicaid at least partially through private insurance. 

 

It uses ObamaCare dollars to provide Medicaid services to the entire population of individuals targeted for ObamaCare’s Medicaid expansion. Those Medicaid benefits are delivered through ObamaCare-approved insurance plans sold on the ObamaCare exchange.

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It uses ObamaCare dollars to provide Medicaid services to the entire population of individuals targeted for ObamaCare’s Medicaid expansion. Those Medicaid benefits are delivered through ObamaCare-approved insurance plans sold on the ObamaCare exchange.

 

The problem is that the state wanted to do it and asked for a waiver to do it. Then the state screwed it up and wants Obama Administration to bail them out. 

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The problem is that the state wanted to do it and asked for a waiver to do it. Then the state screwed it up and wants Obama Administration to bail them out. 

 

Which I don't think is an atypical experience...there have been many states that have #$%@ things up...

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Which I don't think is an atypical experience...there have been many states that have #$%@ things up...

 

No, but it is more likely when they are trying to trick it up with words like private and market to make it more palatable to a broader segment of the population and look innovative.

 

Reminds me of Gavin Newsome.

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Admins, sales, hospitals.... Etc. etc...

 

How could they if they don't provide service? For the record, I'm excluding the known cases of fraud.

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People with Medicare or Medicaid are increasingly turning to federally funded clinics, or even to emergency rooms that cannot, by law, turn them away. Sadly, using emergency rooms for non-emergency health care is unbelievably expensive, making the lower reimbursement Medicare/Medicaid rates not financially stable in the long run.

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No, but it is more likely when they are trying to trick it up with words like private and market to make it more palatable to a broader segment of the population and look innovative.

 

Reminds me of Gavin Newsome.

 

Wierd, here's an piece on Newsom...

 

The Right's Strange New Hero: Gavin Newsom

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My premiums went up $6 a month. The policy is basically unchanged. But I'm one of those corporate hacks.

The wife, in her job as a transplant social worker, deals with a lot of insurance. A lot of, but not all, comments are of a positive nature. Patients and healthcare workers (many deal with their own insurance).

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OK, I know no one wants to really talk about this, but then again that's true of half our threads. 

 

I received my cancellation notices in the mail this week,  Our very expensive (3X what it was prior) basic health insurance from BCBS will end December 31, per the annual agreement signed last November.  This was done to protect BCBS from seen and unforeseen affects from Obamacare.  After November 15, I can log onto BCBS website and pick from their NEW lineup of health insurance product packages, all following Obamacare guidelines. 

 

Today, I received a call from my agent in Houston, who told me to brace myself for sticker shock. 

 

Does anybody know anybody (maybe even your own family) that is benefitting from this law?  Over half of the insured (from the Marketplace) were folks who had their insurance cancelled, and are now paying more.  If they are paying at all. The real information is so hard to find, even for experts in the industry.   

 

It's a catastrophe for millions of people on the independent market.  You corporate hacks are somewhat protected, but you better wake up.  It will have to hit that market hard to stay afloat. 

 

Meanwhile, sports! TV! Beer! Ebola! Celebrity worship!

 

I think you have to be careful with anecdotal evidence.  Here is the Kaiser experience.  A lot of whether you think you are better or worse off depends on where you are coming from, predictably:

 

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At TCU, rates did not go up last year at all (a rare occurrence) and for next year, they are going up marginally I believe.

 

In the addictions field, there is almost universal support for ACA because of expansion of addiction services to many people who did not previously have access, 

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So, do the poor now have insurance they can afford?  Are they actually paying for it?  What are they paying?  How many still uninsured?  How many that 'signed up' ever paid a premium?  1 months premium?  Where are the numbers?

 

My mom is a substitute teacher in Fort Worth and had a part-time retail job. So her income is definitely in that poor/extreme lower middle class area, but she is still several years away from Medicare. Thanks to the ACA and the tax credit, she pays $46/month for silver coverage. IIRC, the plan has a $500 deductible and $500 max out-of-pocket. I'm not looking forward to doing her taxes next year, but she is definitely better off.  

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