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Friskyfrog

TGBDS: Epic Randomness

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Finally finished US taxes (you get till Jun 15 automagically if out of country). Final product was 3 f'in inches thick as every mutual fund transaction had to be reported 1 page/transaction (gotta keep those like me funding foreign terrorists at bay, I guess).

 

Just love those simplified taxes you can fill out on a post card.

 

On a happier note, sails are on and now only final outfitting to do which I should be able to finish in 2 days.

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"Rescued" a new boater today. Looks to me like he blew his engine given all the oil and water mixed together. Legally, I am now the owner of said boat, I think, or at least am owed a settlement for its value (nil when you come down to it). Poor guy had just bought the boat. No auxiliary power, not even any lines other than a 10' totally frayed painter on the bow. No fenders either. Had to break all these out of my stores in order to "rescue" him. I am now awaiting my lifesaving medal from he Queen...or at least Meghan!

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@NewfoundlandFreeFrog How far out were you? And, don't hold your breath waiting on MM to acknowledge your heroism. There's not enough publicity in it for her. meow!

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On 6/8/2019 at 5:10 PM, NewfoundlandFreeFrog said:

Legally, I am now the owner of said boat, I think, or at least am owed a settlement for its value 

Seriously? 

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1 hour ago, Boston Frog said:

Seriously? 

Salvage laws are funny.

 

"A successful salvor is NOT entitled to just keep the salved vessel, under any circumstances, but is entitled to a generous award. The amount of the award, under the law, is based on the following factors: 1) the value of the vessel and its contents after the salvage is complete; 2) the salvor’s skill and initiative in minimizing damage to the environment; 3) the degree of success obtained by the salvor; 4) the level of peril to which the salvaged vessel was subject; 5) the salvor’s skill and initiative in saving the vessel, human lives, and other property; 6) the salvor’s labor and expenses; 7) the amount of risk run by the salvor; 😎 the promptness of the services rendered; 9) the availability and use of any alternative salvage resources; and 10) the readiness, efficiency, and value of the salvor’s vessel and equipment.

 

Consider all these factors together, and you’ll note they strongly favor the salvor."

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1 hour ago, NewfoundlandFreeFrog said:

Salvage laws are funny.

 

"A successful salvor is NOT entitled to just keep the salved vessel, under any circumstances, but is entitled to a generous award. The amount of the award, under the law, is based on the following factors: 1) the value of the vessel and its contents after the salvage is complete; 2) the salvor’s skill and initiative in minimizing damage to the environment; 3) the degree of success obtained by the salvor; 4) the level of peril to which the salvaged vessel was subject; 5) the salvor’s skill and initiative in saving the vessel, human lives, and other property; 6) the salvor’s labor and expenses; 7) the amount of risk run by the salvor; 😎 the promptness of the services rendered; 9) the availability and use of any alternative salvage resources; and 10) the readiness, efficiency, and value of the salvor’s vessel and equipment.

 

Consider all these factors together, and you’ll note they strongly favor the salvor."

How much are you going to bleed him for? 

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1 hour ago, NewfoundlandFreeFrog said:

Salvage laws are funny.

 

"A successful salvor is NOT entitled to just keep the salved vessel, under any circumstances, but is entitled to a generous award. The amount of the award, under the law, is based on the following factors: 1) the value of the vessel and its contents after the salvage is complete; 2) the salvor’s skill and initiative in minimizing damage to the environment; 3) the degree of success obtained by the salvor; 4) the level of peril to which the salvaged vessel was subject; 5) the salvor’s skill and initiative in saving the vessel, human lives, and other property; 6) the salvor’s labor and expenses; 7) the amount of risk run by the salvor; 😎 the promptness of the services rendered; 9) the availability and use of any alternative salvage resources; and 10) the readiness, efficiency, and value of the salvor’s vessel and equipment.

 

Consider all these factors together, and you’ll note they strongly favor the salvor."

You will likely need to forfeit the Good Samaritan Award...

So, if I jump start someone's car, I should just say, "It's mine now?"

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48 minutes ago, frogtwang said:

Stay hard Bushwick Bill. 

Honestly, I am shocked he made it this long.

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8 minutes ago, Feeling Froggy said:

Honestly, I am shocked he made it this long.

 Same. I thought he passed several years ago. 

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10 hours ago, NewfoundlandFreeFrog said:

 

I figure he's in deep enough :lol:!

Pretty literally 

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So @Boston Frog, it struck me that the French use of a rooster as the national symbol seems rather patriarchal, especially as their women wear it on their national soccer uniforms ... so I was using google translate to figure out how the French say 'hen'.  Google says to most frequently used word is 'poule', but that it is also used as an insult roughly equivalent to 'tart' or 'floozy'.  The next most frequent term is 'femelle' which can also be used to mean 'bitch' (although it doesn't specify whether that is the slur use or the dog breeding use of the word).  So that leaves us with 'cocotte' which seems to be used as a term of endearment.  Would the French ladies appreciate us woke American men in the #metoo era calling them 'la cocotte?'

 

Maybe the French should just go with the more gender ambivalent 'chicken' or 'poulet'.  Which I assume is pronounced exactly like 'poule' since the French always drop the consonants at the ends of words?

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2 minutes ago, Duquesne Frog said:

So @Boston Frog, it struck me that the French use of a rooster as the national symbol seems rather patriarchal, especially as their women wear it on their national soccer uniforms ... so I was using google translate to figure out how the French say 'hen'.  Google says to most frequently used word is 'poule', but that it is also used as an insult roughly equivalent to 'tart' or 'floozy'.  The next most frequent term is 'femelle' which can also be used to mean 'bitch' (although it doesn't specify whether that is the slur use or the dog breeding use of the word).  So that leaves us with 'cocotte' which seems to be used as a term of endearment. 

 

Maybe the French should just go with the more gender ambivalent 'chicken' or 'poulet'.  Which I assume is pronounced exactly like 'poule' since the French always drop the consonants at the ends of words?

I don't think poule is all that insulting a word anymore. Women call each other that. I don't remember hearing it very often. Femelle is not a nice way to refer to a human, but pute (whore) is a more common word for insulting a woman. Cocotte is definitely a term of endearment. 

 

Poulet is pronounced "pool-ay." It's more like a cooked chicken you eat. Gender is very strong in French. Everything has a gender. In German, there are three genders. Make of that what you will. 

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1 hour ago, Boston Frog said:

I don't think poule is all that insulting a word anymore. Women call each other that. I don't remember hearing it very often. Femelle is not a nice way to refer to a human, but pute (whore) is a more common word for insulting a woman. Cocotte is definitely a term of endearment. 

 

Poulet is pronounced "pool-ay." It's more like a cooked chicken you eat. Gender is very strong in French. Everything has a gender. In German, there are three genders. Make of that what you will. 

 

I assumed that is how "poule" would be pronounced.  Is it just "pool"?

 

German was the language I took in school, so I knew about the three genders, where the words for wife and daughter (die Frau and die Tochter) are feminine but the word for girl (das Mädchen) is neuter. 

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26 minutes ago, Duquesne Frog said:

 

I assumed that is how "poule" would be pronounced.  Is it just "pool"?

 

German was the language I took in school, so I knew about the three genders, where the words for wife and daughter (die Frau and die Tochter) are feminine but the word for girl (das Mädchen) is neuter. 

Yes, like pool.

 

Yeah, you also have to put the feminine ending on German nouns, so a female teacher is a lehrerin and more than one are lehrerinen, or something like that. 

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