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Duquesne Frog

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Of course we could selectively breed people just like we selectively breed dogs, etc. Of course #2, however, is it's not sure we need a lot of pretty people with hip dysplasia. 

 

In any case by no stretch of the term is selective breeding of positive traits necessarily related to the term eugenics--which has stressed preventing negative breeding--as it has come to be known today. Selectively breeding for specific traits by no means means that one must build concentration camps. For example, someone could set up a foundation that would pay genetically picked people large sums of money to get together and make babies voluntarily only if they so desired.

 

Free market solution that no libertarian could possibly be against.

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3 hours ago, NewfoundlandFreeFrog said:

Of course we could selectively breed people just like we selectively breed dogs, etc. Of course #2, however, is it's not sure we need a lot of pretty people with hip dysplasia. 

 

In any case by no stretch of the term is selective breeding of positive traits necessarily related to the term eugenics--which has stressed preventing negative breeding--as it has come to be known today. Selectively breeding for specific traits by no means means that one must build concentration camps. For example, someone could set up a foundation that would pay genetically picked people large sums of money to get together and make babies voluntarily only if they so desired.

 

Free market solution that no libertarian could possibly be against.

 

Being libertarian means that people can do what they want. What is doesn't mean is that you don't have an opinion on things...

 

For instance, if you want to take drugs Danny, it's up to you. I however, wouldn't recommend it.

 

(Danny, is a Caddyshack reference BTW)

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https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/a32007736/earth-moving-less-covid-19-lockdown-seismologists/
 

Scientists say the “quieter” Earth during protective self-quarantine has reduced the ambient seismic noise. Human activity of all kinds, as we travel and gather and drive around, generates vibrations that distort measurements from finely tuned seismic instruments. In Belgium, scientists report a 30 percent reduction in that amount of ambient human noise since the COVID-19 (coronavirus) lockdown began there.

Now, the resulting quiet means surface seismic readings are as clear as the ones scientists usually get from the same instruments buried 100 meters beneath the Earth’s surface, making measurements more more specific and easier to use and understand. Any seismic noise that falls into the same instrument range as human noise is suddenly much clearer, like if you were trying to listen to two people talking and one simply stopped. 

 

No cost of human life is worth any exchange of scientific data, of course, and the sooner our global self quarantine can safely end, the better. But if the self quarantine extends longer, scientists say they’ll continue to notice new ways their instruments and readings are changing.

 

 

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2 hours ago, frogtwang said:

https://www.popularmechanics.com/science/a32007736/earth-moving-less-covid-19-lockdown-seismologists/
 

Scientists say the “quieter” Earth during protective self-quarantine has reduced the ambient seismic noise. Human activity of all kinds, as we travel and gather and drive around, generates vibrations that distort measurements from finely tuned seismic instruments. In Belgium, scientists report a 30 percent reduction in that amount of ambient human noise since the COVID-19 (coronavirus) lockdown began there.

Now, the resulting quiet means surface seismic readings are as clear as the ones scientists usually get from the same instruments buried 100 meters beneath the Earth’s surface, making measurements more more specific and easier to use and understand. Any seismic noise that falls into the same instrument range as human noise is suddenly much clearer, like if you were trying to listen to two people talking and one simply stopped. 

 

No cost of human life is worth any exchange of scientific data, of course, and the sooner our global self quarantine can safely end, the better. But if the self quarantine extends longer, scientists say they’ll continue to notice new ways their instruments and readings are changing.

 

 

 

Interesting post, thanks.  I wonder if they'll be able to gather any useful data that they otherwise would not have.

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Re the recent White figures for 100,000-240,000 dead: "The White House representative said the task force has not publicly released the models it drew from out of respect for the confidentiality of the modelers, many of whom approached the White House unsolicited and simply want to continue their work without publicity."

 

As any and every high schooler science student knows, this is a very good description of precisely how not, repeat NOT, to do science. The scientific value of non-publically reviewed work is nil. Probably explains a lot, however.

 

Hell...even the NSA publishes the algorithms behind various ciphers. It INCREASES security/algorithmic correctness BECAUSE of the scrutiny, rather than decreasing it, to do so.

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KellyAnn in one of her endless spin gallops this time on WHO "incompetence" states: "This is Covid-19, not Covid-1, folks. You would think that people charged with the World Health Organization facts and figures would be on top of that."

 

And you know what? There truly is scientific incompetence on absolutely crystal clear display here. Just isn't the WHO.

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1 hour ago, NewfoundlandFreeFrog said:

KellyAnn in one of her endless spin gallops this time on WHO "incompetence" states: "This is Covid-19, not Covid-1, folks. You would think that people charged with the World Health Organization facts and figures would be on top of that."

 

And you know what? There truly is scientific incompetence on absolutely crystal clear display here. Just isn't the WHO.

Yeah and Kellyanne wouldn't watch Malcolm X because she didn't see Malcolm I-IX. :rolleyes:

 

And, THABP!

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So, asking this here because most of you know I have airhead moments now and then...

 

I just do not understand 3-D printing. Are those machines like the replicators on Star-Trek? What material do you provide to a 3-D printer to get a product made? Give me the down and dirty because I'm lost.

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Basically you model an object on the computer using a CAD program like Fusion 360. Then send the object to the printer for printing. Most printers use a plastic filament that the machine heats up and builds the object layer by layer. Depending on the complexity of the design and the printer, this process can take anywhere from several hours to a couple of days.  

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1 hour ago, frogtwang said:

Basically you model an object on the computer using a CAD program like Fusion 360. Then send the object to the printer for printing. Most printers use a plastic filament that the machine heats up and builds the object layer by layer. Depending on the complexity of the design and the printer, this process can take anywhere from several hours to a couple of days.  

Not any disagreement with the above, just a heads up reply for someone modeling for 3D prints...

 

Anything AutoDesk (I still favor AutoCAD, and use it for 99.9% of my work), SolidWorks, or even Google's SketchUp garbage will do fine for hard edge.

 

If you are after organics, I would look at ZBrush and disregard just about everything else. (ZBrush takes some backwards thinking to get used to initially, but once you are familiar with it, you will swear at everything else for organic models.)

 

As long as it will output to a *.stl file, it should print on any printer. The key is making certain that your print is set up with stout rigging so that it maintains stability. Warm PLA isn't exactly Inconel level of durable.

 

If you are making anything really beyond baubles and trinkets, there is only one form of "3D printing" that is currently a viable option - DMLS (Direct Metal Laser Sintering). In the realm of manufacturing, it is relatively weak, though. Like MIM vs a milled billet or a casting vs a forging.

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20 hours ago, PurpleDawg said:

So, asking this here because most of you know I have airhead moments now and then...

 

I just do not understand 3-D printing. Are those machines like the replicators on Star-Trek? What material do you provide to a 3-D printer to get a product made? Give me the down and dirty because I'm lost.

It's kinda the inverse process of machining something.  When you machine something, you start with too much material and remove it to get the shape you want.  If you want a hole, you drill one out

 

When you 3d print something, you deposit a 2d map of your final shape and then add material to it in the 3rd direction. So instead of drilling a hole out, you just dont deposit material where you want the hole to be.  If you ever see the term 'additive manufacturing' ... that's the fancy technical term for 3d printing.

 

Most 3d printers use plastic, but some higher dollar ones do use metals.

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Forty years ago today, Mt. St. Helens blew her lid. The stories from then are pretty crazy.

 

“Mount St. Helens exploded in volcanic fury Sunday, unleashing massive mudflows, floods and other land-changing forces that killed at least nine persons, eliminated Washington’s Spirit Lake, and sent adrift an ash cloud that by Sunday night had mo...
https://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/2020/05/mount-st-helens-eruption-witnesses-recall-terror-awe-when-mountain-exploded-40-years-ago.html

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, PurpleDawg said:

Forty years ago today, Mt. St. Helens blew her lid. The stories from then are pretty crazy.

 

“Mount St. Helens exploded in volcanic fury Sunday, unleashing massive mudflows, floods and other land-changing forces that killed at least nine persons, eliminated Washington’s Spirit Lake, and sent adrift an ash cloud that by Sunday night had mo...
https://www.oregonlive.com/pacific-northwest-news/2020/05/mount-st-helens-eruption-witnesses-recall-terror-awe-when-mountain-exploded-40-years-ago.html


God, I’m old...

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SpaceX launch cancelled. Too much lightning around the area and the anvil clouds didn't help, either.

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1 hour ago, PurpleDawg said:

SpaceX launch cancelled. Too much lightning around the area and the anvil clouds didn't help, either.

 

They'll try again Saturday.

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1 hour ago, PurpleDawg said:

SpaceX launch cancelled. Too much lightning around the area and the anvil clouds didn't help, either.

 

Coverage reminded me of sitting in the school auditorium for exciting hours before aborts back in the old  Mercury days.

 

Will be nice to be in the first world again soon after all these years. Forget which "dean of science fiction" it was but I remember a quote from a while back which went along the lines of: "I always expected to see the first flight to the moon. I never expected to see the last one."

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14 minutes ago, Duquesne Frog said:

 

They'll try again Saturday.

Fingers and toes crossed. Last hour, they were saying there's a 30% favorable launch window for their Saturday time. 😬

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