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Duquesne Frog

Sciency stuff

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Had to replace TWO light bulbs this morning :o. Haven't done this for a while. One was my very last incandescent light which was in a very rarely-used, never-occupied corner. The other was one of the very first low-lumen (7W) CFL's ever available that I ever bought--probably 20-25 years ago--and have had in my range hood burning as a nightlight even for most of those years. 

 

Why people complain about modern lighting is beyond me. Only trouble is I probably will die before any of my LED lighting goes. Might have to replace a few CFLs maybe. 

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The only problem I have with the CFLs is that they have to warm up before illuminating at their maximum lumens. I live in a very dark part of the country at this time of the year and my house is surrounded by big trees, so that makes it even darker inside. (Right now it's 7:15am and pitch black outside. Won't be light for another 45 minutes.) It takes about five minutes before the light bulbs are fully bright. This is why I've resisted them, but you can't buy incandescent bulbs here anymore.

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1 hour ago, PurpleDawg said:

The only problem I have with the CFLs is that they have to warm up before illuminating at their maximum lumens. I live in a very dark part of the country at this time of the year and my house is surrounded by big trees, so that makes it even darker inside. (Right now it's 7:15am and pitch black outside. Won't be light for another 45 minutes.) It takes about five minutes before the light bulbs are fully bright. This is why I've resisted them, but you can't buy incandescent bulbs here anymore.

 

Use LEDs then. They are instant and far more efficient than even CFLs. Plus the the TCU lighting design program https://finearts.tcu.edu/idfm/academics/areas-of-study/architectural-lighting-design/  needs support!

 

I've always liked the slowed uptick of light on CFLs in the morning in particular, personally!

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Interesting counter-point to the pervasive notion that human population will continue to rise exponentially over the rest of the century ...

 

The World Might Actually Run Out of People

 

Lutz has this saying that the most important reproductive organ for human beings is your mind. That if you change how someone thinks about reproduction, you change everything. Based on his analysis, the single biggest effect on fertility is the education of women. The UN has a grim view of Africa. It doesn’t predict much change in terms of fertility over the first quarter of the century. But large parts of African are urbanizing at two times the rate of the global average.  If you go to Kenya today, women have the same elementary education levels as men. As many girls as boys are sitting for graduation exams. So we’re not prepared to predict that Africa will stagnate in rural poverty for the rest of the century.

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The bizarre and brilliant rules for naming new stuff in space

The IAU’s rules are in the news this month after the Carnegie Institution for Science announced it needed help naming several moons of Jupiter discovered last year. Carnegie astronomer Scott Sheppard, who spotted the new moons using a giant telescope in Chile, said suggestions should be tweeted to the handle @JupiterLunacy using the hashtag #NameJupitersMoons.

 

But, protocols for planetary nomenclature being what they are, Sheppard can only consider names that meet a few key criteria:

 

It must come from a character in Greek or Roman mythology who was either a descendant or lover of the god known as Zeus (in Greek) or Jupiter (Latin). It must be 16 characters or fewer, preferably one word. It can’t be offensive, too commercial, or closely tied to any political, military or religious activities of the past 100 years. It can’t belong to a living person and can’t be too similar to the name of any existing moons or asteroids. If the moon in question is prograde (it circles in the same direction as its planet rotates) the name must end in an “a.” If it is retrograde (circling in the opposite direction), the name must end in an “e.”

 

Easy peasy, right?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/2019/02/26/bizarre-brilliant-rules-naming-new-stuff-space/?utm_term=.2ce0cd7d53b2

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Archeologists confirm near-legendary tale of crusaders’ siege of Jerusalem

 

Recent excavations south of Jerusalem unearthed a ditch used to defend against siege towers, along with a ruined house Crusaders may have used as cover during a battle. The finds confirm some oft-questioned details of historical accounts of the First Crusade, including how a ditch along the city’s southern wall thwarted the attacking siege engines. And this new evidence provides tangible links to events recorded 920 years ago.

 

https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/07/archaeologists-uncover-evidence-of-first-crusades-siege-of-jerusalem/

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 This is bananas. 

 

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/08/banana-fungus-latin-america-threatening-future/

 

A fungus that has wreaked havoc on banana plantations in the Eastern Hemisphere has, despite years of preventative efforts, arrived in the Americas.

ICA, the Colombian agriculture and livestock authority, confirmed on Thursday that laboratory tests have positively identified the presence of so-called Panama disease Tropical Race 4 on banana farms in the Caribbean coastal region. The announcement was accompanied by a declaration of a national state of emergency.

The discovery of the fungus represents a potential impending disaster for bananas as both a food source and an export commodity. Panama disease Tropical Race 4—or TR4—is an infection of the banana plant by a fungus of the genus Fusarium. Although bananas produced in infected soil are not. 

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16 hours ago, frogtwang said:

 This is bananas. 

 

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/08/banana-fungus-latin-america-threatening-future/

 

A fungus that has wreaked havoc on banana plantations in the Eastern Hemisphere has, despite years of preventative efforts, arrived in the Americas.

ICA, the Colombian agriculture and livestock authority, confirmed on Thursday that laboratory tests have positively identified the presence of so-called Panama disease Tropical Race 4 on banana farms in the Caribbean coastal region. The announcement was accompanied by a declaration of a national state of emergency.

The discovery of the fungus represents a potential impending disaster for bananas as both a food source and an export commodity. Panama disease Tropical Race 4—or TR4—is an infection of the banana plant by a fungus of the genus Fusarium. Although bananas produced in infected soil are not. 

 

This happened before in the 1950s when the production of the Gros Michel banana was wiped out by the same fungus. 

 

A good example of the joys of using a very limited number of varieties of monocultured clones in agriculture.

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5 minutes ago, NewfoundlandFreeFrog said:

 

This happened before in the 1950s when the production of the Gros Michel banana was wiped out by the same fungus. 

 

A good example of the joys of using monocultured clones in very limited varieties.

 

The Irish Potato famine is another. Good ol' Irish Lumper. 

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I guess this is really more Legally Stuff than Sciency Stuff but it is tangentially sciency.  But in any way a crime may have been committed in space.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/23/us/nasa-astronaut-anne-mcclain.html

 

Ms. McClain acknowledged that she had accessed the bank account from space, insisting through a lawyer that she was merely shepherding the couple’s still-intertwined finances. Ms. Worden felt differently. She filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission and her family lodged one with NASA’s Office of Inspector General, accusing Ms. McClain of identity theft and improper access to Ms. Worden’s private financial records.

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1 hour ago, Duquesne Frog said:

I guess this is really more Legally Stuff than Sciency Stuff but it is tangentially sciency.  But in any way a crime may have been committed in space.

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/23/us/nasa-astronaut-anne-mcclain.html

 

Ms. McClain acknowledged that she had accessed the bank account from space, insisting through a lawyer that she was merely shepherding the couple’s still-intertwined finances. Ms. Worden felt differently. She filed a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission and her family lodged one with NASA’s Office of Inspector General, accusing Ms. McClain of identity theft and improper access to Ms. Worden’s private financial records.

 

Time for Judge Judy???

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1 hour ago, NewfoundlandFreeFrog said:

This weekend was a King Tide weekend already in Florida. Gas up your boats if you live in Dorian's path.

What does that mean?

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3 hours ago, PurpleDawg said:

What does that mean?

 

King tides are the naturally highest (annually) of high tides in an area. On the East Coast, this tends to be full moon/new moon in Aug/Sep. Dorian is coming through the same day or so as new moon. 

 

Though this confuses former Fox announcers like O'Reilly, the reason is quite simple: The Moon is closest to the Earth and the Sun-Earth-Moon are all lined up so that the gravity effects are at maximum.

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Back in the early 80's my brother wrote a tide-prediction program on a VIC20. He was in 8th grade at the time.

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2 hours ago, Rothbardian said:

Back in the early 80's my brother wrote a tide-prediction program on a VIC20. He was in 8th grade at the time.

 

But could it handle places like Pei-Hai, China which only get one high tide/day most of the time?

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