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Duquesne Frog

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10 minutes ago, Feeling Froggy said:

Solar safe. #14.

 

Good! NASA, at least, is OK with #13s as well. 

 

What the hell kind of welding do you do that requires #14s?! I had to special order my #14 glass back in the 90s for the pair of partial eclipses here back then.

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Just now, NewfoundlandFreeFrog said:

 

Good! NASA, at least, is OK with #13s as well. 

 

What the hell kind of welding do you do that requires #14s?! I had to special order my #14 glass back in the 90s for the pair of partial eclipses here back then.

Honestly, nothing, which is why it had dust covering it. The last thing I used it for was years ago welding 3" thick plate to a hoist/boom crane in the shop.

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57 minutes ago, PurpleDawg said:

People were shooting off fireworks around me. There was a collective "Woooo!" at the max. Did you get 100% in Nebraska?

 

Yes. About 1 minute and half where I was. No 2 minutes and 40 like the max, but it was plenty long.

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Y'all just be sure to get some good eclipse glasses before the next one.

27-Gifs-animados-macabros-terror-horror-

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I just found out that Dr. Arthur Ehlmann (former TCU Geology professor) passed away last Saturday. Some of you may or may not know that he was a professor emeritus in the Geology department at TCU. I'm truly saddened to hear of his passing, as he was a great man and first rate professor. He was a big part in getting the TCU Meteorite Gallary (Monnig) organized and opened. He was no longer teaching by the time I showed up at TCU, but he was still very involved in the program and loved discussing geology with students. I was lucky enough to meet him and chat every now and then during my time there.

 

Dr. Ehlmann had a big impact on my academic career at TCU. My junior year, I was awarded the Dr. Ehlmann Scholarship for Research Excellence. It meant a lot to receive a scholarship in the name of a man who had such a genuine passion for geology and making an impact on students lives.

 

Rest in peace, Dr. Ehlmann. You will be missed.

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"Dr. Arthur J. Ehlmann, Emeritus Professor of Geology, passed away suddenly on August 19. He spent that Saturday morning doing what he loved best—looking at a new meteorite and visiting with his colleagues.....

A memorial service will be held at Robert Carr Chapel at 2 PM on Monday, August 28, followed by a reception in front of the Oscar Monnig Meteorite Gallery in Sid Richardson.

The family suggests remembrances be made to the TCU Dr. Arthur Ehlmann Scholarship, TCU Box 297044, Fort Worth, Texas 76129."

 

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Dr. Ehlmann was my favorite professor at TCU. A great teacher of geology, but more than that, a great guy to just hang around and talk with. He always had such a good time on the winter field trips.

 

If anyone hasn't seen the Monnig Meteorite Gallery, by the way, you should check it out.

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1 hour ago, Burner said:

Dr. Ehlmann was my favorite professor at TCU. A great teacher of geology, but more than that, a great guy to just hand around and talk with. He always had such a good time on the winter field trips.

 

If anyone hasn't seen the Monnig Meteorite Gallery, by the way, you should check it out.

 

I've heard horror stories about his mineralogy class, part of which was that the exams were oral. 

 

And yeah, I've heard some pretty funny stories about him on those field trips.

 

Geology field trips were the BEST.

 

Btw Burner, I never knew you were a Geo major. When did you graduate?

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I graduated in 1972. Geology was my second major after Journalism. I thought I might be a science reporter but ended up editing a magazine for a medical organization.

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2 hours ago, Burner said:

I graduated in 1972. Geology was my second major after Journalism. I thought I might be a science reporter but ended up editing a magazine for a medical organization.

That's interesting, Burner. Can you share what the magazine was about?

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Trump appoints another science-denying Oklahoman politician  without any science background to science position. Bridenstine to head NASA.

 

https://www.cnet.com/news/trump-pick-nasa-head-controversy-gop-congressman-bridenstine/

 

He would be the very first appointee to not have high level science, engineering, or areospace industry credentials ever appointed to this position as well as the first politician. Here is a list of former appointees. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Administrators_and_Deputy_Administrators_of_NASA  His credentials are simply pathetic in comparison to everyone on the list even before we consider his science denial. 

 

 

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37 minutes ago, crunch said:

It's not like it's rocket surgery.  

 

Actually it is.

 

And his rocket surgery training, skills, and credentials are truly pathetic compared to every single one of his predessors. He doesn't even accept the underlying principles of rocket surgery. He isn't fit to be in the same professional room with any of them.

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1 hour ago, crunch said:

Yet, he is...

 

He may end up there (even some rep senators are questioning the stupidity of the appointment) but that is not what I said. I said he is not fit to be there in the least should you read through the attainments of his predecessors.

 

 

 

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19 hours ago, NewfoundlandFreeFrog said:

 

He may end up there (even some rep senators are questioning the stupidity of the appointment) but that is not what I said. I said he is not fit to be there in the least should you read through the attainments of his predecessors.

 

 

 

 

cea442d5784ae37fe9615b15aefd265fb4a7b9a3

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For those out there interested in thermodynamics, heat engines and weather--which is likely an audience of 1--Irma was extracting just about the theoretical maximum energy it could extract for a number of reasons, low wind sheer being a major one. The temperature difference between the surface water and the cloud tops was 200 degrees F!!!

 

That was some heat engine!

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52 minutes ago, NewfoundlandFreeFrog said:

For those out there interested in thermodynamics, heat engines and weather--which is likely an audience of 1--Irma was extracting just about the theoretical maximum energy it could extract for a number of reasons, low wind sheer being a major one. The temperature difference between the surface water and the cloud tops was 200 degrees F!!!

 

That was some heat engine!

 

Junk science.

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36 minutes ago, NewfoundlandFreeFrog said:

Cassini gone. Or gone an hour and a half ago depending on your views on simultaneity.

Was it a big firey crash and burn? How is stuff destroyed  in space with no oxygen?

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13 minutes ago, PurpleDawg said:

Was it a big firey crash and burn? How is stuff destroyed  in space with no oxygen?

 

Collided with the atmosphere at 22 miles per second. Drag increases roughly with the square of velocity. That means that, for example, Cassini was subjected to roughly 10 times the heating of Columbia (once it was out of control). It's basically gas, condensed metallic gas particles, and ash dust now.

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51 minutes ago, NewfoundlandFreeFrog said:

Cassini gone. Or gone an hour and a half ago depending on your views on simultaneity.

 

If you've got any interest in space, check out the pictures Cassini collected of Saturn.  Truly awesome in the original sense of the word ...

 

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/images/index.html

 

pia21345-full.jpg

 

pia21621-1041.jpg

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1 hour ago, Duquesne Frog said:

 

If you've got any interest in space, check out the pictures Cassini collected of Saturn.  Truly awesome in the original sense of the word ...

 

https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/images/index.html

 

pia21345-full.jpg

 

pia21621-1041.jpg

 

There's also this ebook at nasa.gov

 

https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/the_saturn_system_090817.pdf

 

Also available in various ereader formats. Google NASA ebooks.

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