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Radio Shack Killa

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4 minutes ago, Duquesne Frog said:

 

What is good for the goose ...

 

When have I falsely accused people of bigotry?  

 

I am not incorrect in my assertion that most positions Democrats (and many Republicans) vote for result in higher taxes, more regulations, and less freedom.

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49 minutes ago, Duquesne Frog said:

 

Or oversimplify the other tribe into a neatly labeled pigeon hole rather than really understand what their vision of "better" really means ...

 

What do you think most politicians idea of "better" is and how does it not involve higher taxes and more regulations?

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2 hours ago, Hfrog1999 said:

 

Or just call the other "tribe" a bunch of racist, sexist, homophobes because they dare to believe in personal and economic liberty.

 

Don't need to go "ist" or "phobe". Need to examine real policies. Does a  "belief in personal liberty" include gay marriage and being able to use the bathroom of your personal gender? Does it include free access to the best contraception over the counter? Plan B over the counter?

 

Does a "belief in economic liberty" include supporting unfettered corporate monopolism over the rights of individuals in economic and environmental matters? Does it include supporting tax cuts while increasing spending?

 

These are real differences, true. But they are differences in kind of liberty and regulation and not degree of liberty and government regulation.

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1 hour ago, Hfrog1999 said:

 

What do you think most politicians idea of "better" is and how does it not involve higher taxes and more regulations?

 

I don't know what most politicians think, but as someone who is generally left of center, certainly relative to this community, I'm not sitting here thinking the ultimate goal is higher taxes and more regulations.  I think it is about finding a balance.  I recognize that too many regulations and too many taxes are burdensome on businesses but I also recognize that the bottom-line goals of a business or industry do not necessarily correspond to the goals of a well-functioning society.  I like clean air and water.  I like avoiding financial crises.  I think history shows us that industries left to their own devices do not prioritize those things over profit.  It's just not the way capitalism works.

 

I also like having a stable and well-paying job.  The key for me, and I think most people, is finding the right taxes and regulations in the right amount to achieve both the corporate goals and the societal goals without destroying one or the other.

 

I'm okay with tax reform and I'm okay with getting rid of ineffective regulations conceptually.  I am not okay with blanket tax cuts and blanket slashing of regulations for the sake of slashing regulations.  As with all complicated things, the devil is in the details ...

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5 hours ago, Duquesne Frog said:

 

I don't know what most politicians think, but as someone who is generally left of center, certainly relative to this community, I'm not sitting here thinking the ultimate goal is higher taxes and more regulations.  I think it is about finding a balance.  I recognize that too many regulations and too many taxes are burdensome on businesses but I also recognize that the bottom-line goals of a business or industry do not necessarily correspond to the goals of a well-functioning society.  I like clean air and water.  I like avoiding financial crises.  I think history shows us that industries left to their own devices do not prioritize those things over profit.  It's just not the way capitalism works.

 

I also like having a stable and well-paying job.  The key for me, and I think most people, is finding the right taxes and regulations in the right amount to achieve both the corporate goals and the societal goals without destroying one or the other.

 

I'm okay with tax reform and I'm okay with getting rid of ineffective regulations conceptually.  I am not okay with blanket tax cuts and blanket slashing of regulations for the sake of slashing regulations.  As with all complicated things, the devil is in the details ...

 

I've never had a stable well paying job in my life.

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3 hours ago, Hfrog1999 said:

 

I've never had a stable well paying job in my life.

Me neither. Sounds Communist. None of my employees have a job they can count on, unless they deliver. 

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10 hours ago, Hfrog1999 said:

 

I've never had a stable well paying job in my life.

 

Any societal economy which provides no probability of a stable return on investment for attaining skills of value to that economy or which provides no avenues for attaining them for some portion of the populace is not a societal economy that can function over the long term. There would be no rational economic reason to attain any skills or the skills would be unobtainable in the first place. In point of fact it would be economically irrational to do so even if they were attainable. Better to spend any available resources on booze, opiates, and lottery tickets...as unfortunately we are seeing. Or go into crime/drug dealing/prostitution with its somewhat more basic skill set. Social disorder also becomes rampant as is seen in periods historically that approach this state too closely. This is the issue Duq is addressing, I think.

 

This is not to say that further--even lifelong--training isn't the job of each person in order to keep up. And it is key to understand what skills are going to be rewarded and even be wiling to change course entirely. Buggywhip making skills don't cut it. Nor is this to say that rapid change and increased automation isn't making this process more difficult these days and possibly shrinking the pool for at least the time being. (Many young, highly skilled people I know these days are having to cut and paste their skills into multiple jobs which is probably not ideal, but is present reality. Hell...I worked 2 jobs and took further consulting contracts here for decades so it's not totally new.)

 

As an historical example it took decades for the economy to shake out the unemployment among weavers caused by power looms in the 19th century, and this has been repeated in industry after industry. This, of course, is why coal jobs won't return. It's simply a lie to say they will even if production should increase.  A couple of additional drag line/excavator operators can produce a LOT of coal these days using 80 cubic yard buckets.

 

We have been seeing a lot of the some of the same sort of things even in formerly white collar work. I read a while back that GM has shrunk their white collar force far more than their blue collar force over the past several decades, for example.

 

And finally, as part of all this we do get that historically easily predictable associated social disorder.

 

 

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11 hours ago, Hfrog1999 said:

 

I've never had a stable well paying job in my life.

 

Which has a lot to do with our differing perspectives on this, although I guess "stability" depends on how one defines it (both times I've left jobs, it was because of perceived instability ... the first time I got out before I got shitcanned, the second time I didn't).  Which is fine.  Healthy, even, if those perspectives can be dispassionately included in the debate in our legislature.  If the debate is just one tribe oversimplifying and mischaracterizing the other tribe, not so healthy.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Duquesne Frog said:

 

Which has a lot to do with our differing perspectives on this, although I guess "stability" depends on how one defines it (both times I've left jobs, it was because of perceived instability ... the first time I got out before I got shitcanned, the second time I didn't).  Which is fine.  Healthy, even, if those perspectives can be dispassionately included in the debate in our legislature.  If the debate is just one tribe oversimplifying and mischaracterizing the other tribe, not so healthy.

 

 

There's a huge difference in "stability" in sales jobs and nearly every other job, and I think that's what he was referencing. Assuming one has the proper skills for the job, a person can simply work more hours in order to meet employer expectations, for the most part for most jobs. In sales, no matter how many hours you put in, you can't force people to buy from you. 

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26 minutes ago, Luke Chisolm said:

There's a huge difference in "stability" in sales jobs and nearly every other job, and I think that's what he was referencing. Assuming one has the proper skills for the job, a person can put in more work more hours in order to meet employer expectations, for the most part for most jobs. In sales, no matter how many hours you put in, you can't force people to buy from you. 

 

I agree to an extent, and I am the first to admit I would hate doing and suck at sales.  But even in my line of work, you can be a good performer and still get laid off. 

 

The job I got out of before I got laid off was in the steel industry.  I was there for a year and a half and survived two rounds of layoffs before I got out.  My second job was in the government/academia sector and I had was there for 11 years and got laid off because all of our funding sources dried up, also having survived several rounds of layoffs and organizational restructuring.

 

Nothing is truly stable, even if you are awesome at your job.  There are always circumstances beyond your control which dictate whether your job is "stable."  I understand being angry about those circumstances.  My argument here is that while the level of taxation and regulation may be one of many factors that go into the profitability and job "stability" of a particular business sector, it is far from the only factor (for instance, reading 99's accounts of his situations over the years, I'd argue inept management played a strong role).  And the pain of taxation and regulation on businesses has to be factored into the cost-benefit analysis as well as the things those taxes pay for and the costs not having those regulations have on whatever they are protecting.

 

Currently, I work in what is arguably one of the most heavily regulated industries in the world (nuclear energy).  The place I work for has been in business for 65 years.  At the moment I feel about as secure as I have felt, certainly since before the 2008 recession (which was caused by financial institutions making stupid -- and unethical -- long term decisions for the sake of short term profits).  But then one of our biggest customers just went bankrupt, so who knows.  But heavy regulations (and I assume most everybody would like to avoid as many Fukushimas and Chernobyls and Three-Mile Islands as possible) do not necessarily mean unsuccessful or unprofitable businesses.

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6 hours ago, Duquesne Frog said:

 

I agree to an extent, and I am the first to admit I would hate doing and suck at sales.  But even in my line of work, you can be a good performer and still get laid off. 

 

The job I got out of before I got laid off was in the steel industry.  I was there for a year and a half and survived two rounds of layoffs before I got out.  My second job was in the government/academia sector and I had was there for 11 years and got laid off because all of our funding sources dried up, also having survived several rounds of layoffs and organizational restructuring.

 

Nothing is truly stable, even if you are awesome at your job.  There are always circumstances beyond your control which dictate whether your job is "stable."  I understand being angry about those circumstances.  My argument here is that while the level of taxation and regulation may be one of many factors that go into the profitability and job "stability" of a particular business sector, it is far from the only factor (for instance, reading 99's accounts of his situations over the years, I'd argue inept management played a strong role).  And the pain of taxation and regulation on businesses has to be factored into the cost-benefit analysis as well as the things those taxes pay for and the costs not having those regulations have on whatever they are protecting.

 

Currently, I work in what is arguably one of the most heavily regulated industries in the world (nuclear energy).  The place I work for has been in business for 65 years.  At the moment I feel about as secure as I have felt, certainly since before the 2008 recession (which was caused by financial institutions making stupid -- and unethical -- long term decisions for the sake of short term profits).  But then one of our biggest customers just went bankrupt, so who knows.  But heavy regulations (and I assume most everybody would like to avoid as many Fukushimas and Chernobyls and Three-Mile Islands as possible) do not necessarily mean unsuccessful or unprofitable businesses.

I don't disagree. I'll add that that there are exponentially more "average" performers who have stable careers with a single company in non sales jobs as opposed to those with sales jobs. 

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Now THIS is some high level trolling....

 

 

http://kdvr.com/2017/04/20/mariachi-band-interrupts-cory-gardner-event/

 

 

Republican Senator Cory Gardner was just about to speak at an event in Colorado Springs when he was interrupted by a mariachi band.

The mariachi band played for about 10 seconds at the Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce "Coffee with Cory" event Wednesday, April 19, until they were asked to stop.

The band represented "Americans for Conservation of the Arts and the Latino community.

Members of the band actually became members of the Chamber of Commerce to gain access to the event.

A spokeswoman for the group told Gardner they wanted to get the senator's attention after months of not being able to get a hold of him.

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1 hour ago, Radio Shack Killa said:

Now THIS is some high level trolling....

 

 

http://kdvr.com/2017/04/20/mariachi-band-interrupts-cory-gardner-event/

 

 

Republican Senator Cory Gardner was just about to speak at an event in Colorado Springs when he was interrupted by a mariachi band.

The mariachi band played for about 10 seconds at the Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce "Coffee with Cory" event Wednesday, April 19, until they were asked to stop.

The band represented "Americans for Conservation of the Arts and the Latino community.

Members of the band actually became members of the Chamber of Commerce to gain access to the event.

A spokeswoman for the group told Gardner they wanted to get the senator's attention after months of not being able to get a hold of him.

 

He should've just rolled with it and sent someone on a Taco run.

 

 

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9 minutes ago, NeFrog in the Kitchen Sink said:

Sessions probably shouldn't visit Hawaii any time soon. 

 There's a horrible parasite with the wonderful moniker of the "rat lungworm" on the go there anyway. It eats your brain. I think I'll stay away too.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/10/health/hawaii-rat-lungworm-disease-parasite/

 

 

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6 hours ago, NewfoundlandFreeFrog said:

 There's a horrible parasite with the wonderful moniker of the "rat lungworm" on the go there anyway. It eats your brain. I think I'll stay away too.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/10/health/hawaii-rat-lungworm-disease-parasite/

 

 

I'm worried about Aloha Frog. He's not posting much lately. 

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