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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/16/2013 in Blog Entries

  1. 6 points
    The best summer of my life was 1963 when I rode for the Ehrlecher spread in Jeff Davis County, Texas. They had about 30,000 acres and a couple of thousand head of mixed beef cattle that had to be counted, vaccinated and treated for screw-worms. I was trying to make a hand and they let me ride, paying me $50 a week and all I could eat. They set me up with 4 horses; I had to bring my own hotroll. We had an old Airstream trailer where we slept, out in the middle of nowhere, too far from town to make it worth riding or driving in. The cook had a tent and a wagon where meals were prepared. After a long day in the saddle we'd wash off in the stock tank, have supper, and then entertain one another with stories--some of them were even true. There was one story told by another hand, Sixto (his last name I don't recall) that he swore was true. I must’ve heard him tell it at least a half-dozen times that summer and it was always the same. Some of the other cowhands scoffed, but he swore it was true. I've taken the liberty of putting it in first person, the way I heard it from Sixto, and I think I've got most of it right as to dialogue. I know the facts are just as he told them back then. Once in a while I've added a comment in [ ] to explain something a little better that he didn't originally tell, since we all knew back then what he was talking about. ****** It was in '53 when I was working for the sheriff's department down in Presidio. I was a new deputy in the department, and Sheriff Race was my boss. [Race Harland, known as "Sheriff Race" to most of the people in the county] I had night duty, and that meant I just drove around to see if there was trouble out on the roads. Kids would buy cheap wine or tequila over in “the O’ [Ojinaga, a Mexican town just across the border from Presidio] and raise hell in their daddy's car. Sometimes there'd be some bad wrecks, but usually just a car with drunk kids that run through a fence. One particular Friday night in late October I was over on 67 [state highway 67, between Presidio and Marfa] when I saw this old yellow school bus chugging down the grade from Marfa. I pulled up alongside and saw a bunch of kids in the bus and they looked like football players because I could see some standing and talking with football jerseys on. The bus had "Shafter ISD" painted on the side. Like I said, it was an old-looking bus. I followed it for a while, mostly because I had nothing else to do but then I wondered if it was going to make it up the next hill. After a while I passed and waved at the driver and went on towards town. A few days later I was in Shafter and stopped at a gas station for coffee and to stretch my legs. Just making conversation I asked the kid at the station about the high school football team, if they were having a good season. He shrugged and said "They used to have a six-man team here but not in a few years, I don't think." That puzzled me but not much since that old school bus could have been sold to another district and never painted so it could have been some other team I saw. But after I finished my coffee I went over to the school just to see, since I was curious and being curious is part of a deputy's job. I walked around but didn't see any school bus even though classes were going on. The whole school didn't have more than about 80 students, brought in from the ranches and a few who lived right there in Shafter. After a while I saw an old guy painting and stopped to kill some time with him and just be known around town. When I asked him about the football team he said "Who told you there was any football team here?" I told him I'd seen the team on the bus just a couple of weekends before. He stopped painting and gave me a real funny look. "Deputy, we ain't had no team here in years, ever since the accident." About that time I felt this kind of chill run up my back. He told me back in 1948 there was a six-man high school team that played some of the other little schools around, like Marathon and Fort Davis and Valentine, but that was the last year. He told me about the accident. The Shafter team was returning home from a game in the school bus, getting close to home out on 67. The best anyone figures they topped a hill and began the downgrade, but something must have happened to the brakes or the steering because at the big curve right where 67 crossed Cibola Creek at the edge of town the bus went off the road and down a drop off into the dry creek bed. Every one of them was killed. ****** Sixto went on about checking the accident records in the Sheriff's office and he found the accident report, but he never told anyone who worked there what he'd seen because he feared losing his job or at least being laughed at. Only after he quit the department and started cowboying again did he feel he could talk about his experience, and then only to men he trusted not to call him a liar or a lunatic. After hearing his story and seeing the look in his eyes as he told it, I couldn’t call him either one.
  2. 6 points
    Don Juan was in prison. His daughter Ana ran to tell me the news as my pickup rattled into the wide spot in the dirt road the people who lived there called Galeras. It isn't a town, not even a village, just a collection of houses that had to be built somewhere, and for unknown reasons they were built here. A tiny place, a hard place, a lonely place. Forty-five minutes of gravel, dirt and potholes to the nearest paved road. Water runs down from natural springs higher up in the hills, through plastic pipes and hoses put there by CARE in an attempt to give the people something they could call potable water. There isn't any electricity, except for the generator at Ruperto's house where I spent most weekends. Folks here are farmers, raising corn and pigs and children, all considered essential for a reasonably long and marginally prosperous life in rural Honduras. Juan had a small farm with dismal looking corn, five children, and a two-room adobe house with a clay tile roof. That's where I met Juan, where we became friends, under his roof. For some reason we hit it off from the beginning. I'd get to Ruperto's house about three in the afternoon, drop off my backpack, and begin my ritual walk around Galeras, talking with people and generally looking out of place, the only person within miles with more than just a hint of European genes. One afternoon I met Juan. He invited me in for coffee, and we talked about politics, crops, the weather, his family, his life...the things that men with more empty hours than hopes talk about. We passed whole afternoons together. If times were good he'd ask his wife to bring us tortillas and fresh cheese, or some tamales she'd made from corn masa and mysterious pieces of meat. We'd sit and talk until dark, then he'd light the homemade lamp, an old brake fluid can half-filled with kerosene and a strip of cloth for a wick. The flickering orange light it provided was only slightly brighter than the darkness around us, but in it I could see Juan, surrounded by all his worldly goods, his face lined from days in the sun, his eyes alive with friendship. Now he was in prison. He was my friend. I went to see him. The prison was at Yuscarán. Forty-five minutes back to the highway, another half-hour to the turnoff, then thirty minutes of dust and gravel and I was there. A gold mine birthed the town in colonial times but that played out, and now the main sources of employment were the distillery, a few unimportant government offices and the prison. I presented myself to the guard, and asked if I could visit a prisoner. A full body search later I entered Juan's new world. There was a large central patio of sandal-packed dirt. Surrounding the patio were cells built for ten and holding thirty. I looked for Juan and found him in his usual T-shirt, brown pants and sweat-stained straw hat. Vacant brown eyes came alive when he saw me. We didn't shake hands, Juan grabbed me and hugged me, a manly Latin abrazo. I hugged back. He was embarrassed to be in prison, but, life is that way, isn't it? A man struggles just to make a living for himself and his family, then celebrates the sale of a good corn crop with a bottle of aguardiente and...his shrug spoke eloquently. "Please, let's find some shade," he said, and we headed towards a wall. On the way we passed an inmate selling bananas. Juan reached into his pocket, pulled out ten centavos, and bought two bananas. He smiled and gave me one. It was almost too precious a gift to eat. We squatted in the shade, sitting on our heels, our backs leaning against the wall. We talked, not looking at each other because of his shame. Yes, he was doing fine, but missed his family. Yes, he had enough money to buy extra food to supplement the prison's meager rations, but...well...he needed money to pay a fine. Or a lawyer, I was never really sure which, but it didn't matter. He needed $100. A pair of shoes to me, but freedom to him. Would I please give the money to Ana, and she'd make certain the legal expenses were paid, and he'd pay me back a little at a time until the debt was cancelled? Certainly. Within ten days Juan was home with his family. Juan was a prisoner who could be set free because he was held behind walls of concrete and bars of iron. Galeras held other prisoners not so easily given their freedom. Prisoners of ignorance, of tradition, of poverty. Most are there still, only a very few have been set free.
  3. 5 points
    I've been around. I've met presidents and oil barons. I saw Earl Campbell play football. I watched Clyde Drexler when he was a UH freshman. I saw flaming crashes on race tracks. I used to pass Cullen Davis on the street regularly in downtown Fort Worth. But the most amazing thing I ever saw was Chuck Eisenmann and his dogs. It was about 1960, in the Reporter-Telegram office in Midland. Eisenmann evidently was touring to promote something or other and I was thrilled to meet him, not because he brought dogs with him, but because I had watched him pitch in the Texas League about 1946. He was a name from my childhood. But what he had taught those dogs was unbelievable. I remember he told a dog, ``Turn off the lights." He didn't touch the dog, or gesture or motion toward a light switch. Just said, ``turn off the lights." The dog looked around the newsroom until he spotted a light switch. Then he went to the light switch, reached up with a paw and turned off the lights. I think he had another one of the dogs turn the lights back on. We had people working there who couldn't turn on the lights or follow directions, but those dogs could. Eisenmann then handed a dog a wad of paper and said, ``Put it in the wastebasket." No gestures, no motions. The dog found a wastebasket and dropped the paper in it. And there were other tricks they did. It really was amazing. Years later I discovered that Eisenmann had made a living training dogs such as those. He even wrote a book about how to do it. His method was to talk to the dogs, much as you would to a person, until they actually began to understand all the words. It worked for Chuck. I don't know how it worked for others. But it was amazing to watch.
  4. 4 points
    The clerk in the paint department at Home Depot thought I was a little strange. There I was, Saturday-morning-jeans-and-flannel-shirt dressed, a shopping list in one hand and a cup of complimentary coffee in the other, standing in front of the paint display, laughing out loud. You see, they had polyurethane varnish on sale and that bought it all back in a rush, the memory of the time my Uncle Fred varnished the outhouse. Uncle Fred was a fool for things on sale. If something was on sale he felt he ought to buy it...save some money...get a good deal...even if it was something he had no idea of when or where or how he would use it. Fred saved so much money buying stuff on sale he was usually short a week before payday. He was always surprising Aunt Birdie with what he'd bring home from a trip to town. (Her name was really Bertha, but that was shortened to "Bertie," of course, and most of us kids thought it was "Birdie" so that's what we all grew up calling her.) When Wal-Mart opened up a store in the town just up the road from Fred and Birdie's farm, he must have thought he'd died and gone to heaven. On one Saturday trip to town for a haircut and "just to pick up a couple of things at the Wal-Mart's to fix the electric fence the new calf knocked down," Fred saw a big display of generic disposable diapers, marked 50% off. Now, Fred and Birdie hadn't had any babies around the farm in 20 or 25 years, but these diapers were just too good a deal to pass up. Fred bought 200. The woman at the checkout probably gave him the same kind of look the Home Depot paint consultant gave me -- a 68 year-old man buying a dozen ceramic insulators, a pound-and-a-half of wood screws, and 200 disposable diapers does make the average clerk take notice, after all. Well, naturally when Fred got back home he had some explaining to do. Birdie was a practical-minded woman, and being well past child-bearing age and disposition, she simply could not imagine why 200 disposable diapers were a bargain at any price. But if Birdie was practical she was also still in love with Fred after their 49 years together, and had resigned herself to never fully understanding this man who had won her heart. Fred mumbled something about "insulation" and "chick brooder" and that was enough for Birdie. The disposable diapers went into the shed on the top shelf over the door -- until the following February. That February was the coldest, windiest, meanest February anybody under the age of 85 could remember. It was cold in the morning. It stayed cold all day. It seemed even colder at night. Fred and Birdie's house was modestly insulated, too modestly for that February. They had butane to cook and heat with, and usually the space heaters kept the house warm enough, but not that February. You see, Fred was a little short on cash until the end of the month, having saved too much money at Barney's Auction Barn again, and the little bit of butane left in the tank had to be rationed. They both wore long cotton underwear and two shirts and a jacket around the house during the daytime, but at night, well, at night, it was just too cold to sleep. That's when Fred remembered the disposable diapers. If those diapers would have insulated the chick brooder, why wouldn't they insulate anything? Fred brought in the cartons, spread a few diapers on the kitchen table (it was warm in the kitchen from Birdie's cooking) and sat down to think. It's amazing how crisis can inspire genius, and that's what Fred's idea was, just sheer genius. It took him only an hour or so and a six cups of coffee, too. That night Fred and Birdie prepared for bed, but this time they were ready for anything a cold February night had in store. They wore disposable diapers. They wore them around their legs, around their arms, around every bit of them they could cover with a diaper. One diaper was just the right size to wrap around an arm or a leg, and the diaper's own strip of sticky tape snugged it down so it didn't fall off. Fred pieced several diapers together with that tape, wrapped them around his chest, and pulled a tee shirt on over them. Pajamas over that, and he was ready for bed. Birdie was a little trickier to fit, owing to a few now relatively minor anatomical differences, but soon she too was fully insulated against the bitter February winter. Of course, once insulated they had to move around the house carefully to avoid loosening the tape, but all in all it was an outstanding feat. They were already dressed for bed one night when I stopped by to see how they were doing, and I'll confess I was impressed. They did look a little odd, sort of like two deep-sea divers with their suits inflated and their steel helmets off, walking stiff-legged around the house, but they were warm enough, and that's all that mattered. The diaper insulation lasted only about a week, then the sticky tape began to come lose during the night and the diapers began bunching up, but by then Fred's Social Security check had come in the mail and he had enough money to call the butane truck out to fill up the tank again. I don't know whatever happened to the rest of those diapers. I suppose they're still out in the shed, waiting for the chick brooder project. But I digress. I was telling you about varnishing the outhouse. Uncle Fred’s favorite place for sniffing out bargains was Rudy’s Railroad Salvage. Rudy’s was a large barn-like warehouse with splintery wood floors, concrete block walls, a tin roof that had seen much better days at least a decade before, and military-surplus light fixtures swinging from black and red wiring. The warehouse held an astounding inventory: garden rakes and folding chairs, wool socks by the gross and roofing nails by the keg. Somewhere among the remnants of lost and damaged freight shipments Fred discovered a stack of five-gallon plastic buckets of polyurethane varnish for $25 each, no limit, cash-and-carry. As he read the label on one bucket, Fred realized this polyurethane varnish was almost miraculous. It dried fast to a hard, water-resistant finish and bonded to any porous surface, guaranteed not to peel or blister for at least five years if applied according to the instructions on the label. Now Fred has been meaning to do something about the worn floorboards and railings on the front porch. Fact was, Birdie had been gently nagging him about it for the last six or seven years. And the porch swing, and the porch furniture, they could stand a fresh coat of varnish as well. So Rudy loaded two five-gallon buckets of varnish into Fred’s old pickup, and stuffed five $10 dollar bills into his own pocket. Fred’s truck bounced over the cattle guard into the driveway and for once in her life Birdie was pleased as punch to see Fred come home from Rudy’s. She had groceries to buy and an appointment at the hairdresser’s for a permanent and needed the truck herself, and Fred had finally bought something at Rudy’s that wouldn’t wind up gathering dust in the shed. She beamed as she made Fred’s lunch, telling him how happy she was that he was finally finding time to “take care of that little honey-do project and paint my porch, it’s such a pitiful sight.” She kissed him lovingly on the cheek then climbed into the pickup and headed to town while Fred dug an assortment of brushes and pails out of the shed, preparing to varnish every unfinished stick of wood on the porch. Which he did, and it was beautiful, too, drying to a high-gloss finish so shiny it looked like ice. The job went quickly, Fred being nothing if not a hard worker, and he was finished with at least an hour to spare before Birdie returned from town. Fred discovered he’d overestimated the amount of varnish he needed, and still had quite a bit left in the second bucket. Still in a varnishing mood, he looked around for anything else that needed a quick coat. After varnishing two trivets and an old ladder-back chair without a bottom, Fred’s eyes found the outhouse. I never really understood why Fred and Birdie didn't put indoor plumbing in their farmhouse, but evidently they were satisfied with the two-holer that came with the place. How it had withstood so many bitter winters and blazing summers was a testament to its builder’s skills and the quality of the wood he used. Fred commented on that fact more than once, always saying something like "they just don’t build ‘em that way anymore," which was certainly true. I didn’t know of anyone for miles around who had actually built any kind of outhouse in the past fifteen years, much less one that would stand as a monument to home carpentry. The outhouse had been painted long ago, so long ago that the color had been forgotten and now only naked wood faced the elements. Fred reasoned a couple of coats of varnish would not only make the old outhouse look better than new, but they would further extend the privy's useful life for as long as he would have any interest in it. The old pine boards were dry and drank up the varnish. There was just a little left in the bucket, and not wanting to waste any of his bargain, Fred finished his afternoon of varnishing frenzy by applying a liberal coat to the seats. There! Wouldn't Birdie be pleased! Fred cleaned his brushes with paint thinner, wrapped them carefully in old rags, and stored them in the shed. Then he went to the back porch, washed the varnish spatters off his hands and forearms, picked up the morning newspaper he hadn't finished at breakfast, and leaned back in his living room recliner to catch up on current world events. All that work had left him pleasantly weary, however, and inside of ten minutes he was snoring peacefully, headlines across his stomach. While he was asleep, Birdie came home. Birdie came in the back door to the kitchen, but she'd already seen the front porch with its new coat of varnish. That "polly-thing" varnish made the wood look, well, so shiny, she sighed, but at least it was done and looked much better than before. She put away her groceries, set her pocketbook on the shelf in the bedroom closet, checked her new permanent once more in the dresser mirror, then walked out the back door to the outhouse. Fred awoke from his well-earned nap and immediately noticed it was nearly sundown. He stood up, turned on a light, and checked his pocket watch. Quarter of seven, Birdie should be home by now and supper should have been on the table a half-hour ago. Fred shuffled into the kitchen, looked around, and saw no sign of Birdie. Beginning to feel slightly alarmed, he looked out the window and saw the pickup truck parked exactly where it should be, under the carport, but still no Birdie. He walked into their bedroom, looking for signs she'd come home, but saw nothing. Her pocketbook...where did she keep it? The closet, that's right...top shelf...next to the old hatbox. Yes, it was there. But, where was Birdie? Fred was a man who counted on his woman's routine and predictable habits, and this was unsettling, finding she had been there and now was no where to be found. He returned to the kitchen, stepped out the back door, and into the yard, just in case she was in the garden doing goodness knows what at this hour. It was then that Fred heard the moans coming from the outhouse. Fred hurried to the source of the cries, and putting his mouth close to the door called, "Bertie? Hon, is that you?" Now I don't know who else Fred would have expected to find in that outhouse, but I suppose the surprise of hearing that sad, mournful sound coming from its interior would make anyone pause before jumping to a conclusion. "Oh, Fred! Of course it's me!" Birdie cried out, "Fred!...ohhh, Fred, what have you done to me, Fred?" It was Birdie's voice, all right, no doubt about that. "Bertie? What's wrong? Are you sick, baby? Bertie, are you all right?" Fred was now definitely alarmed. "Ohhh....ohhh lordy, Fred! Why'd you do this to me?" Birdie was becoming distraught. "Do? Do what, Bertie? Bertie...what's wrong? Tell me, baby, what's wrong?" "Oh, Fred...I can't get up! I...I'm stuck, Fred! I'm stuck to the seat and I can't get up!" Fred's jaw dropped open with a look of utter shock on his face. Couldn't get up? Stuck to the seat? Why, that was just plain imposs... Fred's thoughts froze. The polyurethane varnish! The miracle varnish that dried fast to a hard, water-resistant finish and bonded to any porous surface! Birdie had bonded herself to the outhouse seat! "Bertie? Hon, can you open the door? Can you unlatch the door and open it?" "Oh, Fred, I can't move! I tried to get up and nearly yanked my backside off! Fred, I can't reach the latch!" Birdie was starting to cry, now. Fred had heard her cry only a few times in their long life together, and every time it broke his heart. Only this time it was worse, because he'd caused it. "Fred, lordy, please help me, Fred!" "Baby, I'm gonna try and break down the door!" Fred shouted through the crack between the door and the outhouse wall. "You stand back out of the way!" "Fred I can't move myself off this seat! How am I gonna stand anywhere!" Birdie hollered. Fred could tell she was really peeved because she never hollered unless her patience was just about gone. Fred put his shoulder into the door, but the door barely moved. He tried again, harder this time, and got only a rattle from the latch. "Fred, hurry! Ohhh...Fred, I wanna get out of here! Hurry, Fred, hurry!" Birdie's cries gave him the extra adrenaline he needed, I suppose, for the next time he hit the outhouse door as hard as he could and broke the latch. The door swung open, and there was Birdie's tear-streaked face looking up at him. Now when Fred got to this part of the story, I admit I had to put my hand to my mouth to keep from smiling at the thought of Aunt Birdie sitting there in the dark outhouse, varnished solidly to the seat, but when Fred looked down at the only woman he'd ever loved in his whole life I know there was nothing but anguish on his face. He grabbed her hand and forearm and said, "Baby, I'll get you up from there!" and at the same time, he lifted. "OOOHHHHH! Fred, don't! You're pullin' the hide right offa me!" Birdie shrieked. "I'm plumb stuck to this thing, can't you see that? If I could get loose I'd get up by myself!" Fred tried a different approach. "Bertie, baby, I'm gonna lift your leg up just a little, to see if we can..." He never got a chance to finish his sentence, for as soon as he touched her, Birdie wailed again, "Fred don't you move that leg! I've been stuck here so long both legs have gone to sleep and they're hurtin' me something awful! Oh, Fred, lordy, Fred, do something but don't touch my legs, Fred!" Birdie had passed right by distraught and peeved and was now approaching panicky and downright mad. Fred stood there for a moment, not really knowing what to do, just knowing full well what not to do. But once again, crisis situations bring out the fast thinker in even the slowest of minds, and if this wasn't a crisis situation then Fred had never in his life seen one. "Bertie, I'm gonna call the doctor! He'll come right out and get you off of that thing! I'm going inside to call and I'll be right back, baby, you just sit there and I'll be right back!" Where in the world Fred thought Birdie would go is a mystery to me, as it was to Birdie herself. The look she gave his fast-retreating figure would have killed any other man dead in his tracks, but Fred doubtless had built up a resistance over the years and ran to the house unscathed. He returned almost breathless after what must have been a five-minute eternity for Birdie. Then they waited, Birdie firmly seated and Fred gently holding and stroking her hand. There wasn't much to talk about. Doc Waller's old Chevy rattled over the cattle guard, down the drive, and into the back yard, its headlights aimed directly at the outhouse and its two occupants. He stepped out, his black bag in his right hand, and walked forward. "Good evenin' Fred...Bertie. I got here just as soon as I could." Doc Waller had dedicated his life to his patients in the little community and was on call at any hour. I doubt he ever finished a meal at one sitting. "Bertie, Fred tells me you've got yourself into quite a fix, here. What seems to be the problem?" The fact that Birdie was sitting in an outhouse with the door open and in the glare of automobile headlights was not lost on Doc Waller, he just always liked for his patients to have the opportunity to describe their ailments, however obvious they might be to him. He said it helped them feel a bit more at ease in the examining room. By now Birdie was exhausted from her ordeal, and her voice was quiet. "Oh, Doc, I'm stuck to the seat. I can't get up and Lord knows how I've tried but I nearly skinned myself doing it, and my legs have gone to sleep and, ooohhhh, I just want to get inside my own house and lie down..." Her voice started to trail off into a sob, bless her heart. Fred explained to Doc Waller how he thought this all came about, how he'd painted the porch and the swing and the outhouse and finally the outhouse seats with polyurethane varnish he'd got dirt cheap at Rudy's Railroad Salvage, and how Birdie had come in from town and not knowing any better, poor thing, she'd come out here and before she knew it, why, she was stuck tight as a tick to the fresh varnish. Fred stopped to catch his breath and the doc just rubbed his jaw with his fingers and nodded slowly, as if he already had a solution to the problem. "Fred, you have some turpentine? And oil. Any baby oil on the place?" Fred thought a moment. "Uh..yeah...turpentine, got plenty of turp in the shed, Doc. But, no, no baby oil. Why would we have baby oil?" That seemed a logical question to him, in spite of a sizable inventory of disposable diapers in the shed. "I've got motor oil, and linseed oil, and...in the kitchen we've got cooking oil. Won't any of that do?" The doc pulled off his hat and his coat, and began rolling up his shirtsleeves. "Fred, bring me the turpentine, the cooking oil, and plenty of cotton rags. Let's get to work, here," Doc replied. The work was tedious and slow. Doc would pour a little turpentine onto a cloth and dab it on the area where Birdie's anatomy was varnished to the seat. Birdie would yell as the turpentine stung her abused skin, ashen-faced Fred would hold and pat her hand, saying, "There, baby, it's comin' loose, everything's gonna be all right, hon," and Doc would swab Birdie and the seat with Wesson Oil to keep her from sticking again to the still-tacky varnish. It took two hours of dabbing, yelling, patting and swabbing, but at last, Birdie was free. Fred and Doc helped her to her feet, which prompted more crying as her legs started regaining their natural color and feeling, and helped her waddle into the house. Doc cleaned Birdie up with soap and water while Fred banged about in the kitchen making her some tea to calm her nerves. By 10:30 the ordeal was over. Birdie slept on her stomach for the rest of the week. Fred was contrite, waiting on her hand and foot, never really able to say out loud how ashamed and sorry he was for what had happened, but by his actions Birdie knew. Her backside healed quickly, thanks to the ointment Doc Waller had the pharmacy send over, and soon Birdie was sleeping on her back once again. The story remained untold among the three of them for several years, but finally came out at a family gathering of some sort. It became an instant classic, and had to be told every Thanksgiving or Fourth of July when we'd all finished that particular holiday's feast, still sinfully full of Birdie's home cooking. Even after hearing it a dozen times it always made us kids laugh until we hurt. Once Cousin Georgie laughed so hard the Dr. Pepper he was drinking came out his nose. Uncle Fred would tell the story, and Aunt Birdie would always blush and poke him in the ribs when he got to the part about "her backside." It seemed to sort of embarrass her for us kids to hear she had one. As I grew older I laughed a little less, I suppose, but inside...well, inside I felt prouder. These two wonderful people, sharing a lifetime of hard work and memories, sitting there telling us about it all, laughing at themselves, so much in love with each other. It made me proud to belong to them. And that's why I just had to laugh out loud in the paint department at Home Depot.
  5. 4 points
    This day, August 13, was my mother's birthday. She would be 106 today. Got to thinking, as us old codgers can do, about the lives preceding mine. Mama's lifetime (she lived to almost 87) saw her go from the horse-and-wagon era (she was born under a wagon near Kimball's Bend down in Bosque County in 1910) to the age of jets and computers. She went through the depression, 2 world wars plus Korea and Nam. She went to Germany for Oktoberfest.. She was a widow the last 38 years of her life. She was an excellent writer with a terrific imagination and sense of humor. l can recall years back when she heard ``I wonder who's kissing her now" on the radio and remarked, ``Where exactly is her `now'?" The Dallas News moved her from the state desk to what was then still ``women's news" because the sweet young things in that dept. were letting too many double-meaning things get by. Mama was a farm girl with a liberal education and could catch that stuff. She probably never castrated a calf, but surely had seen it done and knew how. She could have made the Olympics if crossword puzzle solving were an event. I still miss her. Think back to her parents,born in the 1880s. As children, and even young adults, they had virtually nothing that we take for granted -- cars, telephones, indoor plumbing, you name it. I remember in the late 1940s at their farm house, the phone would ring and Gran would say, ``Don't answer, that is Kleins' ring." Unless you wanted to listen on Kleins' conversation. Party lines were something else. She was a champ at wringing a chicken's neck, plucking it, cutting it up and frying it. All the way from chicken yard to dining table. Let Col. Sanders try that. When my grandmother was in her late 60s she got the most wonderful gift: A cream separator so she wouldn't have to churn so much. I miss her, too, even if she did think enemas were the cure for almost anything a little boy might have.
  6. 4 points
    Some of this may have been mentioned in past years, but bear with me: Since I go back further in time than anyone here (I know we are in the ``common era," but I grew up in what was surely an uncommon era), I will relate some memories of my grandfather Milner (the grandfather who didn't know Wyatt Earp). He was a farmer and boss of a thresher crew mostly, though during the Great Depression he moved into town (Henrietta) and opened a garage. So that was my first memory of him. He'd let me pump gas up into the glass tank at the top of the gas pump, which was a thrill for a 3-4-5 year old kid. Then when WWII came along, and gas and tires were rationed, he went back to farming. Through it all he drove the same 1934 Chevy pickup. We lived in Tulsa 1944-48, but either by car or train I got to Henrietta each summer. Remember being at the station in Denison (always a big rail center) in 1945 and waiting for troop trains to go by so that our passenger train could procede. I guess the troops were moving moved west as the European war was ended and we still had the Japanese to fight. I also spent the first half of 1944 living in Henrietta with my grandparents and attending the second grade there while my parents hunted for a house in Tulsa (Tulsa had a big airplane plant and housing was hard to find). My most indelible memory of that was the fire escape slide from the second floor of the elementary school. We would play on it, and one day I was sliding down and sort of rolled up the side and got a big cut in my upper thigh. Had to be sewed up. Only realized later that a few inches more and I would have sung soprano all my life. I would accompany ``Daddy" as we called him on his jaunts down U.S. 82 to Ringgold, St. Jo, Muenster, etc. for cattle auctions. That road is straight, but it does go up and down some nice hills. It was his frugal habit to cut off the ignition at the top a hill and coast down the hill before starting the engine again. Now, yes, in 1944-45 we had gas rationing (since he was a farmer it didn't affect him that much), but this was false economy on his part, I now realize. Besides which, far as I know he never drove faster than 30 mph anyway. That pickup was the first vehicle I ever drove (this was a little later, when I was about 12 and helped with a corn harvest by driving the pickup while men tossed corn into the truck bed). It was that truck (made of solid pre-war steel) that Daddy drove across his farm each day. He took his 10-gauge shotgun with him in the cab and if he saw a jackrabbit, he poked the gun out the window and got the rabbit to take home to the two old dogs that he had. Once he hit a bump on one of these trips and the shotgun went off and blew a hole about 8 inches in diameter in the roof of the pickup cab. I think after that he stopped taking the gun with him. That's enough for today about G.E. Milner of Henrietta. The last time I saw him they had moved back into town in the late 1950s, and he passed away in early 1961, to the end more a man of the 19th century than of the 20th. I did get from him a couple of useful earthy sayings, as when he described some really good dessert as ``richer than 3 feet up a bull's ass."
  7. 3 points
    I was fortunate enough to be able to go to the Masters the year Fred Couples won it, 1992. Being a P.G.A. member at the time, I had become good friends with the McGregor salesman. It just so happens his dad was President of McGregor at the time. Obviously, he went every year. He told me that if I could pay for the airfare and my meals, everything else was taken care of, meaning motel room and transportation to the course. I could get into the tournament just by showing my P.G.A. card. In fact, I could get into just about any tournament by doing the same thing. I went to the Colonial and Byron Nelson many times just by signing up and getting my badges for the week. But, the Masters didn't work that way. When you got to the course, you had to show your card and driver license. They give you a "sticker" that you had to wear. Of course, I bought a Masters cap and would put it on there every day. The area around the club is rather blah. In fact, if you didn't know where you were going, you wouldn't even know that Augusta C.C. was there. We flew into Atlanta, he rented a car, and we made the drive up to Augusta. As soon as we checked into the hotel, we headed for the course. He was meeting some friends and made arrangements to meet under the "big tree" right by the clubhouse. He pointed me to the ticket booth and took off. Sure enough, I showed them my card and D.L., got my sticker and I was inside the gate. The first thing I wanted to do was start at No. 1 and walk the course. At that time, television didn't show much of the front nine, so I knew nothing about those holes. My first impression was that I couldn't believe there was a golf course that was as hilly as this one was. It was up and down on almost every hole. By the time I got to the back nine, I was already worn out and I was a lot younger then. Every green was monstrous and looked like an elephant was buried on them. "Amen Corner" is unbelievable. The two par 5's, #13 and #15 are two of the most beautiful holes I have ever seen. On Thursday, I made it a point to just hang around #13 and #15. Of course, right behind #15 green is the pond that you see on #16. I bought one of those little Master folding chairs, and parked myself where they would hit their second shots from. What you hear about leaving your seat and coming back to it later was absolutely true. Need to go to the bathroom and come back? No problem. Want one of their cheap sandwiches (they are and really good)? No problem. Another one of my favorite places was right next to #15 green. Watching shots come in there, and then the players trying to putt on it was terrific. One day, I decided to go stand behind #16 green when the pin was in the right front part of the green behind the bunker. Corey Pavin just happened to make a hole-in-one while I was standing there! Flew it into the hole. There was a Weather Warning on Friday. Everybody had to clear the course. While I was trying to find a cab, I met an elderly couple that was going to same motel. We decided to share the cab. Turns out it was Jack Nicklaus's personal secretary and her husband. Super nice people. I decided that they needed looking after, so decided to meet them the next morning at #7's green, by the ropes where the players walked going to #8 tee box. Sure enough, they were there and I spent the better part of the day with Jack's uncle as we followed him around. The seat he was using was one of those where the top split open and had a point on the other end like an umbrella. He was a little wobbly on it, so I let him use my chair and I used his seat. What a great guy he was. Next thing I know, we are walking down the right side of #11, and I was being introduced to Jack's wife, kids, etc. Basically, I spent all day with this couple. Gave them my card and about 2 months later something came in the mail addressed to me. It was a very nice autographed picture from Jack. I have to admit that there are certain holes, like #9 and #18 greens that took me by a little surprise. Tthey are sitting out in an area by themselves. By the greens, there are no trees at all. If it wasn't for the crowd around them, they would look rather plain. If you are down in the valley where most of the drives are on #9, when looking at the green, the front of it looks like a green wall. the "false front" on #9 and #14 can be very disconcerting. A shot that comes up short will roll back down the hill 20 or 30 yards. If you are wondering why the pins are in the same places every year, once you are there and see the undulations in all of the greens, the answer becomes very simple. Those are about the only places they can put the pin where there is a relatively flat place around the hole. They are truly amazing to see in person. TV doesn't do them justice. Obviously, my favorite golf tournament of any on the tour.
  8. 3 points
    The Summer of 1980 was by far the hottest, evilest heat I've ever experienced. I remember that summer well. I was riding for Will Speck, the owner of the Draggin'-S brand down northeast of Bandera. The grass was brown and dry and brittle...Will told all us hands he wanted no smokes outside the ranch house so's to lower the chance of a sudden fire. Lots of the boys took up chewin' because of that "no smokes" rule, but it didn't last too long because we were all too dry to spit. Anyway, one really hot, hot day I was ridin' the fence to patch up any breaks the stock caused from trying to get into the next field to look for moisture. It was miserable with hardly any shade except for this one old tree leaning out over the creek, which was now nothing but a dry creek bed. So I ease my horse--a pretty little mare called Dynamite Chica 'cause she was little but could blow up mighty big under a careless rider--I ease Chica down into the dry creek bed and we stop under the shade of that one tree. Well, I dismount and loosen the cinch to give Chica a bit of breathin' room and lean back against the rocky sides of that creek bed to wipe what little sweat I could produce from out of my hat. There were the usual noises out there, 'way off from town--the wind blowing through dry grass and leafless tree limbs, the whirring whine of the cicadas, all those were normal, but...there was something else I couldn't quite place. It was like something scraping on hard ground or rock, sort of metallic-like. So bein' naturally curious I start looking around for what's making that noise. I figured at first maybe an old tin can was blowing around in the breeze, but the sound was from down low, in the creek bed, where there wasn't much wind. I keep looking and finally I saw it...something that made my jaw drop. Comin' right down the middle of that rocky creek bed was one of those green and yellow and black striped lizards. And the scrapin' sound was sure enough metal on rock, 'cause that lizard was draggin' a canteen. Yeah...that Texas summer of 1980 was sure enough one to remember.
  9. 3 points
    In a Numbers Make Me Horned first, we're going to turn away from college football and DUSHEE (although not team performance metrics) and try to put this most recent TCU basketball season in some perspective. A running gag among some on this board, there has been a revisionist tendency by some to elevate the Billy Tubbs years as putting TCU among the elite programs in the country. It was, by some measures, the pinnacle of TCU basketball, challenged only by the brief run of success had by the Killer Frogs of the mid-1980s. But that pinnacle consisted of a single NCAA tournament bid, followed by an unceremonious 1st round exit at the hands of a 12-seed Florida State team, and two NIT bids. The Frogs have made the NCAA tournament seven times (1952, 1953, 1959, 1968, 1971, 1987, and 1998), but four of those times were in the 1950's and 60's, when the NCAA tournament was arguably less prestigious than the NIT. The 1953, 1968 and 1971 teams were 16-9, 15-11 and 15-12, respectively. This season was the Frogs' seventh NIT bid (1983, 1986, 1992, 1997, 1999, 2005, 2017). Then there were all the years in between. Since 1950, the Frogs have had 19 seasons of single digit wins So how special was the 2017 Frogs NIT run in the program's history? How does it compare to the other teams in the conference and in the state? Just how dismal has TCU basketball been otherwise? To assess this, I went to College Basketball Reference and used their SRS metric (Simple Rating System), which uses a similar approach as DUSHEE, to plot team performance as a function of time. SRS, like DUSHEE, provides a relative performance compared to an average team (SRS = 0). College Basketball reference only has SRS calculated back to the 1949-1950 season. Then, in addition to a marker for each team's performance in a given year, I plotted a 5-year moving average (MAV) for each team as an indicator of program strength during the time the senior class was at the school. Thus the MAV value in a given year, say 2000, is the average SRS score of the 1995-1996, 1996-1997,1997-1998, 1998-1999, and 1999-2000 seasons. By following the MAV curve, you can qualitatively assess when a program is ascendant, declining, or keeping performance level. Because I'm plotting the MAV in the last year of the 5-year envelope, it will often appear that the MAV is lagging the actual year-to-year performance. Texas Schools: This plot is the collective basketball history of most of the Texas D-1 schools since 1950, the bold purple line showing TCU's MAV. From 1955 until 1984, TCU was a below average D-1 program during that three decade period. For a 5-year stretch in the late 1970's, TCU and Rice needed binoculars to be able to see the rest of the state; and the rest of the state, particularly outside of Houston and UTEP, wasn't all that spectacular. That's just how bad TCU was during that stretch. But the Frogs did become sharply ascendant during the end of that period, becoming solidly middle-of-the-pack in the state in the late 1980s (Jamie Dixon's tenure as a player) before a slow decline through the mid-1990s. Then Tubbs made the program sharply ascendant again, briefly challenging Tom Penders' UT teams as the best program in the state before another steady decline into another decade of mediocrity from 2005-2015. But if you look at the tip of that peak during the Tubbs' era, and look for the little purple triangles that mark the year-to-year SRS scores for TCU around that peak, you can see that the peak is largely driven by one single year, the 1997-1998 NCAA team. Based on the SRS metric, that team had the highest score of any team in the state from 1985 forward, and behind only the 1968 and 1983 Houston teams since 1950. Also note that this past season's TCU team has the second highest SRS score of any TCU team, the only other TCU team to exceed a single season SRS over 15. Houston and UTEP dominated the state from the mid-1960s until almost the mid-1990s, when Texas became the most consistently high-performing team in the conference, which it held until about 2012. SMU showed some early dominance in the 1950s and Baylor has emerged the top power in the state over the last few years. Southwest Conference: This chart has a lot of the same data as the previous chart, but includes only the SWC teams for the years in which the teams were actually in the conference. So Tech arrives in 1961, Houston doesn't arrive until 1977, and Arkansas, which wasn't included in the previous figure, disappears after 1992, four years before everybody else disappears. Perhaps the most interesting thing to note here is how awful a basketball conference the SWC was during most of the 1960s and 1970s. From 1968-1973, there was not a single SWC program with an above-average SRS 5-year MAV. And even into the 1980s, only the addition of Houston and the ascendancy of Nolan Richardson's Hogs made the conference look halfway respectable. Arkansas left on a very high note; its 1990-1991 team had, by far, the highest SRS score (27.3) in the conference from 1950 on. WAC/MWC: As we all remember, after the demise of the SWC, we joined the new and "improved" 16-team WAC, which shortly after we joined broke apart into the MWC and the Leftovers WAC. This hybrid chart shows all the teams that were in the WAC prior to the MWC split and then the teams that joined the WAC after the split; thus after 1998, this chart shows all the teams in both conferences. Thus TCU shows up twice, from 1996-1997 through 2000-2001 as a part of the WAC, and then from 2005-2006 through 2011-2012 as a part of the MWC. The "WAC Folds" line marks when the WAC ceased to exist as a football conference; I recognize that the WAC still has life as a basketball conference, but a man only has so much time to account for so many basketball teams. Note that during this time, while Utah, Tulsa, BYU, UNLV, UNM, and Fresno all vied for the best program in these conferences, the 1997-1998 TCU team has the highest single season SRS score. In fact, even if you take the WAC back to it's predecessor days (next chart), that TCU team had the highest SRS in conference history, dating back to 1950. Higher than Rick Majerus', Keith Van Horn-led, Final Four Utes, higher than Bill Self's best Tulsa team. Conference USA/American Athletic: This chart, like the WAC/MWC one, shows multiple related conferences on one chart; the teams that formed the original CUSA, the core of which formed the eventual American Athletic Conference, leaving behind a gutted and transformed CUSA. I didn't try to add all the new teams in the modern CUSA. This conference was always dominated by three teams, Cincinnati, Louisville, and Memphis. TCU was already on the way down from their 1998 peak and was never really a factor in this conference. Big 7/8/XII/XII-II: Our current home. TCU and Tech have battled for the cellar of the Big XII-II throughout our short time in the conference, but both teams appear to be sharply ascendant. This chart goes a long way to show just how good a basketball conference this is right now. Going back to the very first chart with all the Texas teams and the current TCU program is squarely middle-of-the-pack. In the Big XII-II, we are, by this metric, the worst team in the conference, and with Tech, the two worst programs by a significant margin. The other interesting thing to note, going back historically, is that from 1950 to 1980 or so, while Kansas was (with Kansas State) the best program in the conference, it was only by nature of a fairly weak conference. Kansas really didn't become a true national power (by the SRS metric, at least) until it and (Billy Tubbs-led) Oklahoma began to rise in the late-1980s. Then, unlike Oklahoma, Kansas has stayed at an elite level over the better part of the last three decades. No one has really come close to Kansas' supremacy since OU's decline in the early-1990s. The best ever Big XII team based on SRS? The 1987-1988 Oklahoma team coached by one Billy Tubbs. The SRS metric seems to really like Billy, Chuck ... Completing TCU's basketball journey to date, let's take a look at some of the other major conferences' histories. Big East: I figured I'd start with our coach's old conference, to give a sense of what he and Ben Howland did with the Pitt program prior to coming to TCU. The Big East formed as a basketball conference beginning with the 1979-1980 season with members from a number of other conferences. At the time of its formation, Notre Dame (which didn't actually join the conference until a few years later), Syracuse, and Georgetown were the top teams until the mid-1990s. At that point, UConn became and remained the top program in the conference until about 2005 when a bunch of teams, including Pitt (bold blue line), Louisville, Villanova, and WVU all reached about the same consistent level until the football schools all left the Big East after the 2012-2013 season. Aside from a brief rise from 1985-1990, Pitt basketball had not been anything other than a pretty average program, and sometimes terrible (around 1970). PAC 12: Those John Wooden UCLA teams were pretty good. SEC: The late-2000s Florida team is the only program to be able to say it was clearly better than Kentucky over the last seven decades. ACC: The ACC started out as kinda a crappy basketball conference. From 1970 on, however, pretty salty. B1G: Perhaps the most evenly competitive of all the major conferences. Illinois, Ohio State, Indiana, Michigan, Michigan State, Wisconsin , and even Purdue have all had at least a brief claim to be the best program in the conference. Only Northwestern has been consistently mediocre over the last seven decades.
  10. 3 points
    These are a few words from a column written 22 years ago last month by a former writer known to many of you.... ``The result is that whereas `conservative' used to mean that one was dedicated to the preservation of the best of the status quo, but not blindly so, the word itself has changed. A conservative used to be thoughtfully dignified. He or she was probably well-off and protective of the monied interests, but with a sense of noblesse oblige. Somewhere along the line, the new conservatives started shaving their heads and preaching social revisionism. Conservatism became radical rather than conservative...... ``Today's conservatives have bnecome all too often merely a clique of opposition to the `other guys', who may be a racial minority or merely anyone who disagrees about whatever issue makes them froth, such as abortion or gun control or welfare abuse or taxation. ``Conservatives used to be coolly superior, tough but above it all. The new conservatives go around feverishly fearing a catalog of conspiracies. Do you think the conservatives of years ago would have tuned in to Rush Limbaugh? Not on your Cal Coolidge autograph-model straw boater..... ``Of all the sins to which American liberals will need to plead guilty at St. Peter's knee, abetting the rise of single-issue zealots could be the worst.''
  11. 3 points
    Christmas Eve Morning, Stuck at the Ranch Christmas Eve mornin' an' I'm stuck way out here Four hours from town an' holiday cheer. Cuss my sorry luck! I'm the new hand, I know, But still, it ain't fair the Boss said I can't go Into town with the others to celebrate there. While they're havin' fun, I'm stuck 'way out here. Oh, I'm not all alone, the coosie came back From town with supplies. Now he's in his shack A'stirrin' up somethin' from out of a book. He's not a bad fella for a cowboy camp cook, But he's an old hand. Forty-seven next year! Just too old to mind bein' stuck 'way out here. Well, grumblin' won't make the day any more fun An' I've got a full day of chores to get done. First feed the stock then break up the ice That froze in th' troughs and buckets last night. My pards drink hot cider and sing "Deck the Halls" While I'm stuck 'way out here muckin' out stalls. Oh, I knew what I's doin', signin' on as a hand, A cowpuncher's life, it ain't always grand. You ride early 'til late mos' ever durned day, An' work hot, tired and dirty. You sure earn your pay! You feel ev'ry emotion, joy, anger an' fear. They're part of the job when you live 'way out here. That old round pen gate is creakin' an' draggin', Another half-hour an' I'll quit it from saggin'. I scoop grain for the hosses from out of a sack, Then traipse back to the stable to mend some old tack. How long has it been? I guess nearly a year I signed on to cowboy an' live 'way out here. The stable's all quiet, an' I start reminiscin' 'Bout all of the good things I think I've been missin'. But after a spell feelin' sorry for me My thoughts turn to all of them things I'd not see, Like a just-borned new foal, or that big herd of deer, If I lived in town an' not 'way out here. My hoss stamps his foot. I stand...stretch...and then I give him a carrot from out of the bin. I glance out the window at the sun's fadin' glow An' think of a stable twenty centuries ago. A new ma an’ pa, and a Babe lyin' there. They tell He left heaven to live 'way down here. Why, the cowboy church preacher said that He did As he told us a story I'd heard as a kid, Of a king who was born just as common as me, Who followed a trail that led to a tree, An' now sits by the Father, in heaven somewhere, To give life forever to sinners down here. Christmas Eve in a stable, guess there's no better place To think about life, and God's lovin' grace. An' then I feel growin' a glow in my chest As it dawns on me just how much I've been blessed To be warmed by His sun and to breathe His clean air He don't make for the city...but for just 'way out here. While my pards take in the sights of the town I've got all of Creation, if I just look around. They're eatin' stuffed turkey and pie with ice cream, But I've got Coosie's good biscuits and bacon and beans. I add up my blessin's and feel downright cheered. Maybe life ain't so bad after all 'way out here. ©H R Chafin, 2013, 2015
  12. 3 points
    Life in a cow camp was generally made up of long days spent in the saddle and short nights spent in rolled-up blankets. The eau-de-jour was a mixture of horse, cow, dust and man. We were lucky that the cook kept us well-fed with the usual beef and beans you find in every cow camp, but sometimes there were eggs and bacon and sausages and potatoes and Dutch-oven baking powder biscuits, everything flavored with just a touch of wood smoke. Once in awhile the "coosie" would even surprise us with some kind of "sweet." Usually this was rice pudding with a handful of raisins thrown in, or maybe his version of a fruit cobbler made out of dried apples or dried peaches. But on truly special occasions he’d make up some extra biscuit dough and roll about a biscuit's worth flat and thin on a floured board, and drop a spoonful or two of stewed, sweetened dried fruit onto one half or the other of the circle. Then he’d fold the other half over the fruit, and seal the round edge with a fork or his fingers, whichever was handier, and drop the little half moons of raw dough into about two inches of hot fat. He’d keep an eye on things for a couple of minutes, then one flip with a fork, another couple of minutes’ worth of watch care, and then he'd remove those golden-brown little pies to some spread-out newspapers to cool. I swan, there’s nothing I’ve ever tasted better than a still-warm fried pie and a tin cup of hot, blacker-than-sin coffee. My favorite recollection of coosie's fried pie cookery is one day in early fall when Toy Raynor and I were surveying the grass that was still green from the late August rains and making note where Mr. Ehrlecher’s cattle had scattered. Somehow those critters sensed the fall roundup was getting close, and took it upon themselves to make sure we all earned our fall wages by scattering themselves from here to yonder and back, so’s that every hand had to ride harder and longer than any other time of the year, except, of course, for the spring roundup. We had left the camp just after daybreak and had ridden all morning northwest and up into some of the most rugged parts of the ranch. This was sure enough Paradise for me. Toy and I rode at our own pace, stopping from time to time to let our horses blow while Toy rolled and smoked a cigarette. I was happy just to wait for one of his stories or to learn from the old cowboy as he taught me to judge how many head the grama would graze or to understand how cows thought and therefore figure where they could be found. Well, on this particular day we expected to be riding all day and not get back to the wagon until the job was done or the sun had set, whichever came first. So coosie had packed us a lunch for our nooning. We weren’t in any special hurry to eat, since we'd fed ourselves pretty well at morning chuck, but when it was a little past noon we came to a slope with above-average grass and decided to stop, and give our horses and ourselves a chance to graze and rest. The slope slanted downward to the northeast and overlooked a wide valley that stretched north toward an upthrust of rust- and yellow-colored rock. The sky was as clear as spring water. There was a right nice breeze blowing in from Mexico down to the southwest. We could hear the cry of a red-tailed hawk somewhere off in the distance. The sight and the moment were just plain inspiring, even for a kid who saw this kind of scenery almost every day. I loosened the cinches and removed the bits while Toy built a hatful of fire. I pulled the rolled-up horse blankets from behind our saddles and spread them on the ground. Toy already had unpacked the saddlebags with our lunch and the coffee pot. Coffee was making. We began to unwrap our two lunches—newspapers wrapped around a tea towel which was wrapped around two slices of sourdough bread with fried meat between them, a carrot, an apple, and in another, smaller towel, two fried pies. Toy looked at me, I looked at Toy, and he just grinned and said, "He went all out today, didn't he?" We sat in partial shade and ate our meat and bread. I got up walked over to the horses. Mine got the carrot, I never did like those things much, and I finished the apple. By then coffee was made. Toy pulled two tin cups out of the saddlebags and poured. It was time for dessert. Now, you might not believe me when I tell you no king, no maharajah, no pharaoh of the richest kingdom on Earth has ever had any dessert tastier or any better than those fried apricot pies coosie packed for us, but I swear to you it's the truth. The filling was thick and sweet. The crust was browned just right, the edges were sealed so no filling oozed out until you bit into it, and the pies were still nice and warm after their 6-hour ride behind Toy's saddle. The coffee was hot, and no one ever accused Toy Raynor of using too much water in a pot of coffee. We took our time eating our pies, enjoying every bite, quiet, not wanting to say any word that might break the spell of that moment. The red-tailed hawk, some cicadas and two grazing horses provided our noonday conversation. Coosie's fried pies provided everything else we needed. It's been more years than I care to count since that day, but whenever I ride out in the fall of the year the memory is as fresh as if it was yesterday. I can almost taste that sweet apricot filling and the fried biscuit dough crust. I catch myself sniffing the air, hoping for that dusty, smoky smell of horses and men working cattle. Toy and coosie…both gone, now I reckon. They were "old men" when I was still a kid, and now I'm their age or more. No such thing as bad pie, I suppose, but an apricot fried pie—and a memory of a good horse and a good friend—that’s unreservedly the best there ever was or likely will be.
  13. 3 points
    One of my friends on the Frog Horn, being of questionable taste and sanity, asked me for some newspaper (or Star-Telegram) memories. I've mentioned here and there some of the old personalities from the S-T. Guys I knew best (and this is when there were more guys than women in the business) included columnist Jim Trinkle and our old sports group like Herb Owens, George Kellam, Dick Moore, Flem Hall (our boss and my neighbor), Bob Clanton, George Wallace, Bob Sonderegger, Bob Hood (recently departed), etc., and my editorial page comrades like Bill Youngblood, roger Summers, Cecil JOhnson, Tommy Denton and J.R. Labbe. Anecdotes? Well, Moore covered several Olympic games and came back from one of them (about 1960 or 1964, I guess, complaining that he had let U.S. shotputter Parry O'Brien borrow his (Dick's) room. O'Brien used it for a tryst with Aussie swimmer Dawn Fraser and left the room a mess. Herb Owens was funny. (I've told elsewhere the story of his ``Frank Lane" phone call to Lon Goldstein, wherein he told Goldstein he was looking for a first baseman for the White Sox and Lon said, ``Have you tried Leonard Brothers?"). Herb was our sports ``slot man" (the guy putting the section together, decided stories to be used, assigning headlines to be written, etc.) for the evening S-T. He sat at the desk idly eating paste (there were pots of flour-based paste essential to all newspaper operations) while reading copy. Herb also once went to the Panhandle to cover a HS playoff game (this was when the S-T was more or less the newspaper of record for all of West Texas) and wrecked his car. He came back with an expense account entry of a couple thousand dollars to fix his car. It was disallowed (this was at a time when an S-T worker had to turn in a pencil stub to get a new copy pencil with which to edit copy....the paper was not throwing nickels around freely). I've also told elsewhere the true story about a former S-T editor and the thermostat. We had gotten a new copying machine and it happened to be situated against a wall under a thermostat. This editor asked someone how to use the new machine and was told that the controls were on the wall and you set it for how many copies you wanted. He did set the thermostat for his copies and waited. Finally he realized he had been snookered. Perhaps the half-concealed laughter around the newsroom was a clue. I imagine some of you remember Jerry Flemmons. Flemmons was an excellent writer and also one of those people who is always in the right place. As when he took a leave of absence to be the press secretary for Waggoner Carr's gubernatorial campaign. Thus he happened to be in Austin, and on the UT campus, just when sniper Gary Whitman opened fire from the tower. When two cops finally ascended the stairway to the tower roof to get Whitman, Flemmons was with them. He got the story first-hand. I'll keep this short and save more stuff for another time, like the lowdown about J.R. Labbe or how Roger Summers almost had a surprise roommate.
  14. 3 points
    And all the finger-pointing (if ever a game deserved finger -pointing, this was it), I was reminded of an old Frog star, Blair Cherry. When Cherry was the coach, the very successful coach, at UT, a big cigar alum asked him, ``Coach, how many students we got now?" Cherry responded, ``Oh, about 18,000, I think." And the alum said, ``Well, why the hell can't you get one of them blocking out in front of the ball carrier?" Not long thereafter, such comments led Cherry to take his 32-10-1 record and go back to Amarillo. His last season (1950) was 9-1 before losing to Tennessee in the Cotton bowl. But the point is that I had been thinking about a blog pointing a finger at one of those occasional sea changes in football. I had about decided that this was to be the era of the basketball-on-grass game exemplified by Oregon and a few others on the college (well, semi-pro) level. I was thinking, the old days of defense are over. It'll take a few years for defenses to catch up with the latest offensive trend (just as D eventually dealt with the single wing, the straight T, the split T, the veer, the wishbone, etc.). I was premature. Turns out we are not quite yet seeing the era of the commonplace 50-45 game. There will be some, but not every week. I point my finger at the TCU defense. It actually did a very good job of restricting Tech's offense. Good D (with a couple notable exceptions) should have won the day. Tech even came up with a very good defensive plan (I guess) and certainly very good defensive effort. I guess about the plan because how can you tell when the Frog offense keep shooting itself in the foot? So the finger has to be pointed at the TCU offense. Some pointing goes to Boykin. We have seen few more athletic quarterbacks at Frogland (certainly not since Dutch's day). But there has to be some soul-searching in the coaching offices. They have to figure out how best to use this young man. Then there is an OS finger pointing at the receiving corps. I got to watching them when the TV allowed, and they were not exactly as open as butcher knives. Carter was a few times. But it is hard to throw to receivers who are not open. Also not wise to do it. They were better last year. So a finger has to wiggle in the direction of Coach Luper, who replaced last year's WR coach. His son is doing okay. Not sure yet about Dad. Of course all five fingers on the pointing hand go toward the OL . It is not very good. It needs to be better. Or else we are staring at a 3-9 record or thereabouts. There is not a lot of offensive scheming that can hide a bad OL. And the fingers pointing at the coordinators are busy. I don't know enough to criticize calling this play or that play. But I can criticize the overall confused look of the offense in the first half and say it goes to the coaching, either overall or maybe some over-coaching of the QB. I have hopes the Frogs will win another couple games, but I really don't know how they will do it. Maybe they cut down on the foot-shooting. Maybe they can recruit OL people from the student body. Maybe a light bulb will go on over the OC's heads. And if they overcome what we have seen, and find a key to success. I will point a finger at mine-ownself and say, ``I wuz wrong, fellas."
  15. 3 points
    One of the most intriguing candidate interviews I can recall (our editorial board tended to interview most candidates for all offices, if we could get them in our building for an interview) was David Dewhurst, the first time he ran for statewide office. He was very impressive, except that everything he said (it was like he was programmed) was more applicable to running for governor or lite governor than for whatever down-ticket office he was supposedly trying for. It was really strange. We'd ask a question about land commissioner or whatever it was and he'd give the pre-recorded answer about stuff that had nothing to do with that office. Yet I guess he has been an acceptable lootenant guv, once he got there. Among local candidates the one that stands out was June Garrison. I knew June from when I covered tennis at Colonial CC. Then she was drafted by local GOP to run for tax collector. She said down with our board and when the first question was asked, she broke down in tears and left sobbing. Only candidate to do that, as I recall. Problem was that she was totally unprepared for someone to actually ask anything. She got elected and was swift enough (June is a very nice person, by the way) to retain the deputies who had been running the office very efficiently, so that it remaining running efficiently. Of course, my personal favorite was Jim Wright, a consummate good politician who never met anyone he couldn't stay in touch with whatever high office he held. My feeling about him may be colored by the fact that he had my column about Abe Martin (when Abe passed away) inserted into the Congressional Record. Interviewing candidates meant you did find some oddities. Like Gene Kelly. He was an obscure lawyer from someplace in South Texas and ran several times for various high offices, hoping his familiar name would boost his chances. Or Johnnie something-or-other. She ran for governor several times, getting about as votes as I did. She did high marks for perseverance.
  16. 3 points
    Any avid college football fan, particularly one who follows one team closely over the course of a season, knows that teams of 18-22 years old kids/men are fickle. The 2005 TCU team starts the season by going into Norman and handing the Sooners the second of just 5 losses they've had at home in the Bob Stoops era. Then the next week they lose to a 5-6 SMU team. Last year's TCU team was all over the map as well, losing badly to a mediocre Iowa State team but whipping a solid Baylor team. In many cases, such imprecision from our college football teams is rationalized away with excuses like "coach didn't get them motivated" or "trap game" or "getting caught at the Indian casino playing poker with a table of hookers shows that Johnny wasn't ready to play." Any one or combination of such excuses might be relevant, but the reality is that college football teams, even the best ones with the most disciplined and senior-laden rosters, are extremely inconsistent. So as we enter the first week of the 2013 college football season and we look over the Frog's schedule and tick off the wins and losses, let's review the 2012 season and look at just how confident we should be when we predict that W in the win column for the SMU game. DUSHEE, guide the way As we've discussed before, Point Differential compares how Team A does against Team B relative to how all of Team B's other opponents have done against them. The Point Differential (PD) tells us that if Team A beats Team B by 10 more points than the average team on Team B's schedule beat them by, then if Team A is consistent, they should be pretty close to 10 points better than the average opponent against every other team on their schedule. Let's take the 2012 TCU team as an example. TCU's average PD for the year was 3.6, meaning that TCU was, on average, 3.62 points better against their opponents than the average team their opponents played. In turn, here were the final PD's for all of TCU's opponents on the year: Kan Uva SMU | ISU Bay Ttech | OkSt WVU KSU | Tex OU MichSt -15.8 -9.6 1.3 | 1.5 9.3 3.8 | 14.3 0.9 18.6 | 8.3 13.9 7.1 Table 1. Season average PD's for TCU's opponents in 2012 So if TCU (and their opponents) had been perfectly consistent in their play, we would have expected the outcome, or margin of victory, for each of those games to have been roughly TCU's PD minus their opponent's PD. So Table 2, we compare the "expected" outcome to the actual outcome: Opp Exp. | Act. Diff Kan 18.4 | 14 -4.4 UVa 13.2 | 20 6.8 SMU 2.3 | 8 5.7 ISU 2.1 | -14 -16.1 Bay -5.7 | 28 33.7 TTech -0.2 | -3 -2.8 OkSt -10.7 | -22 -11.3 WVU 2.7 | 1 -1.7 KSU -15 | -13 -2 Tex -4.7 | 7 12.4 OU -10.3 | -7 3.3 MichSt -3.5 | -1 2.5 Table 2. Based on Point Differential the expected outcome for each of TCU's games last year compared to the actual outcome. Based on this, we would surmise that TCU's worst game of the season was the Iowa State game where an expected 2 point win was in reality a 14 point loss. TCU did 16.1 points worse in that game than the rest of the season indicated they should have done. They followed that game the next week with the game in which they most "out-kicked their coverage" against Baylor. Had both teams performed, on average, as they performed for the season, we should have expected Baylor to have beaten TCU by 6 points. Instead TCU beat Baylor by 4 TDs. From this perspective, the games in which TCU (and their opponents) performed most like their "average" selves were the West Virginia, Kansas State, Tech, and Michigan State games. The Baylor, ISU, Texas and Oklahoma State games were the games most unlike our average performance. Even the Best Are Inconsistent Despite TCU's youth, upheaval, and conference inexperience, TCU was the 44th (out of 124) most consistent team in college football based on standard deviation of PD (13.9 points). By that metric, the most consistent team in college football last season was Troy with a standard deviation of 7.7. Assuming that their performance looks like a normal distribution (i.e., a bell curve) then it is 32% likely (1/e) that in any one game they are at least 7.7 points better or worse than their average PD would predict. And that is the most consistent team in college football. There was a roughly 1-in-3 chance that TCU's play in a given week was TWO TOUCHDOWNS or more off of their "average" performance. Alabama, DUSHEE's (and everybody else's) best team, was the 13th most consistent team in the country, with a standard deviation of 10.1 points. If we repeat the exercise that we did for TCU in Table 2 for Alabama, we get the following: Opp OppPD | Exp Act | Diff Mich 11.5 | 19.6 27 | 7.4 WKU -2.8 | 33.9 35 | 1.1 Ark -4.4 | 35.5 52 | 16.5 FAU -8.4 | 39.5 33 | -6.5 Miss 6.7 | 24.4 19 | -5.4 Mizz 1.9 | 29.2 32 | 2.8 Tenn 0.5 | 30.6 31 | 0.4 MissSt 3.9 | 27.2 31 | 3.8 LSU 15.3 | 15.8 4 | -11.8 A&M 26.3 | 4.8 -5 | -9.8 Aub -8.7 | 39.8 49 | 9.2 Uga 18.7 | 12.4 4 | -8.4 ND 17.9 | 13.2 28 | 14.8 Table 3. Alabama's expected and actual performance Besides the week 3 annihilation of Arkansas, Alabama's most "uncharacteristic" performance was the MNC game against ND. On average, we should have expected Alabama to have beaten ND by two TDs rather than 4. But again, there was a 1-in-3 chance that Alabama's performance could swing at least 20 points on a given night last season. On that night, it swung up two TDs. Understanding this, you begin to see why going undefeated is such a difficult thing to do. Even the best teams in college football will have a game or two where they underperform by a touchdown or more. And if those games come against an opponent whose average performance is only a touchdown worse, or who happens to overperform that week, that team loses, even if it is, statistically, the better team. Alabama was, statistically, 5 points better than A&M. Play that game 100 times and Alabama probably wins 60**. But on that particular day they lost by 5. ** Monte Carlo simulations using an adjusted PD estimate that Alabama would win 55-60% against A&M -- perhaps we'll discuss such simulation techniques on a future post. Selling Oceanfront Property in Kentucky The most inconsistent team in college football in 2012? Kentucky with a standard deviation in PD of 27.1 points. Opp OppPD| Exp Act | Diff L'ville 4.8 | -19.2 -18 | 1.2 KentSt 4.5 | -18.9 33 | 51.9 WKU -2.8 | -11.6 -1 | 10.6 Fla 18.9 | -33.3 -38 | -4.7 SoCar 15.8 | -30.2 -21 | 9.2 MissSt 3.9 | -18.3 -13 | 5.3 Ark -4.4 | -10 -42 | -32 Uga 18.7 | -33.1 -5 | 28.1 Mizz 1.9 | -16.3 -23 | -6.7 Vandy 5.1 | -19.5 -40 | -20.5 Tenn 0.5 | -14.9 -20 | -5.1 Table 4. Kentucky's roller coaster season. Kentucky "should have" lost to Kent State by 19. They beat the Golden Flash by 33. Kentucky "should have" lost to Arkansas by 10. Instead they lost by 42. Vanderbilt treated them similarly. Georgia "should have" beaten Kentucky by 33 but only beat them by 5. If you bet on Kentucky during the 2012 season, you were a fool. In a strikingly odd statistical anomaly, of the 10 most inconsistent teams in college football last year, seven were on TCU's schedule including six from the exceedingly inconsistent Big 12: Kentucky 27.1 SMU 26.5 UCLA 24.3 Arizona 23.8 Oklahoma St. 23.7 Texas Tech 23.1 Baylor 22.4 Texas 21.8 West Virginia 21.5 Kansas 21.4 Table 5: The 10 most inconsistent college football teams of 2012. TCU's opponents are bold. So as maddening as TCU's inconsistency may have felt for fans last year, the Frogs were in reality one of the more consistent teams in their conference. Which is damning with faint praise. So some may accuse me of writing all of this as a hedge against my performance in college pick-em contests. But I assure you my motives are purely analytical. That said, if I do poorly, come to this post to see my excuse. The rest of you suckers just got lucky ...
  17. 3 points
    Frogtwang posted this week about chatting with his dad in a hot tub or something and it started me thinking. Many of you, being younger, have living dads. Those like me, who do not, can advise you to spend time with those fathers, in or out of a hot tub, and, like Twang, talk. Talk about whatever (``Of shoes and ships and sealing wax....of cabbages and kings"). My father would be 108 years old next month. He passed away in 1959, having just turned 54. And, damn it, I do not have enough memories of him. For various reasons, we did not spend as much time together as some boys and fathers. For one thing, much of my life (all but four years spent in Tulsa during the war) he worked on morning newspapers, and when he was home, I was in school, and when I home, he was working. Oh, there are memories. We went to a lot of baseball games as a family in Tulsa and some in Dallas. We took vacations to Galveston and Padre Island (which was still undeveloped in 1950) and Carlsbad and such places. We visited some of his brothers and sisters (he was the youngest of 12 children and I had first cousins his age) in places like Ballinger and Fort Stockton and of course I knew his brother Henry, who was closest to my father in age and lived in or near Wichita Falls where I was born. He surprised me the first Christmas after the war with a new bicycle, which I think he had had to assemble. We played a game, in Tulsa, where I looked at a map of Texas in the family atlas and called out a county and he responded with the county seat. It was the kind of thing he had learned as state editor on a Texas newspaper. I saw his annual from the year he attended junior college (it was either Wichita Falls JC or Hardin JC at that time; now Midwestern University). I knew he had not actually graduated from high school, but he seemed to know almost everything. I saw the scar on his leg and knew he had been shot in a hunting accident when he was about 16 and had almost died. When John Ford's ``Darling Clementine" came out in 1946 and we saw it (it is a highly fanciful Earp-Clanton OK Corral yarn) I learned that I should not take it seriously, and that in our family Wyatt Earp was considered a bad man. I had read ``Tombstone", which was Earp-flavored, but a little later I read ``Helldorado", written by a man who was in Tombstone, and it mentioned my father's father (yes, my own grandfather) as having been on the other side of the squabble from the Earps, which clarified the situation a bit. And when I wanted to go into the newspaper business, he tried to dissuade me (he wanted me to be a veterinarian), but gave in and I later found out that he took some pride in my early journalism efforts. But he had been gone a few years and I was married and we had a daughter when I realized how little I really knew about my father. I knew vaguely that he had a tough early life, but I found out that after his father died in 1917, having already lost the Ballinger newspaper, things got really tough. My father's mother, whom I never knew because she died in 1930, held the family together (at least the younger ones who were still at home) by doing things like managing boarding houses (in Coleman, Ballinger and other towns)in the late teens and early 1920s. That's how my father's education was interrupted. His mother was living in Wichita Falls with Henry (who had become a pharmacist) in the 1920s, and Papa drove a Coca-Cola truck for a while, went to the junior college for a while, had no money and finally got a job on the Record-News almost by accident. They wanted someone to write about the oil business, which was a big deal there. He said he knew a lot about the oil business (mostly, I suspect, how to change oil on a Coke truck), got the job about 1928 and stayed on to become city editor before leaving in 1943. After my mother died in 1997, I found in her things letters they had written each other while he was courting her (a TSCW graduate, she lived in nearby Henrietta and may have been the Record-News stringer there) in 1932. That was eye-opening, as we don't often think of our parents as having had lives, or romance, or dreams before we came along. I also found letters he had written when he was on a tour with Studebaker and the Elks Club magazine in 1930. He seems to have a very interesting time doing that and made some neat friends, including Hollywood actresses and a former Lafayette Escadrille pilot. I also found letters he exchanged with acquaintances in the 1930s as he tried to get a job in New York, or Baltimore (both big newspaper towns then). I found through some of those letters that the Depression (capital D) was really a hard time. I recalled my mother mentioning once that Papa at one time worked for no pay in Wichita Falls, but got to keep his job so that he would have one when they could again pay him (Boston and others may understand this). I still don't know as much as I would love to know about his life. I realize he never really talked much about his early life, probably because it had been tough and not much fun. I would give anything to be able to ask him questions now. I'd like to be able to tell our daughter, and our granddaughter more about him. The point is don't dally. Take advantage of opportunities with your dad, and your mother. Ask questions. Take notes if you have to. One day it will be too late.
  18. 3 points
    This will teach you to applaud blogs..... In the summer of 1956, when I was 20 and before my junior year at UT, I went with three friends from HS (two of them also from college) to Pierce, Idaho, for a Forest Service job in the White Pine Blister Rust Control program. I knew two guys where I lived at UT who had been there the year before, and one of them was returning, too. We had received instructions on what to bring. On the way up from Boise to Orofino to Pierce we purchased ``corks" (as caulked boots were known up there) and Can'tbustem brand heavy, heavy denim pants. Both required. Also long-sleeved shirts. We went from Pierce to Headquarters, Id. (named for being the HQ town for the Potlatch Co., which was cutting down trees for lumber in that area). And thence by our camp boss's truck to our own camp, which was set up with tents each housing four of us (wooden floors, cots to sleep on) and with an eating tent and the cooks' facilities. We were greeted by our boss, ``Dirty Ed" Ogden (that really was how he was known up there), who told us how the camp would be run. He tossed in his favorite phrase for anyone who did not do what Ed said to do, which was ``Dirty Pigf***er." About Dirty Ed: He had lived up there (and this was still sort of the frontier, where the only civilizing factor was the Forest Service and the national forest system) all his life except for a brief paid vacation to Europe in WWII. He ran this camp each summer (for a group of very young men) and did something else the rest of the year. Had a wife and I think a child living in the area. Ed explained to us that if we didn't measure up, he would ``take your plate off the table and send you down the road." We took this as a warning, and indeed, the next day the friend in whose car we had driven from Dallas to Idaho voluntarily left to go back to Texas and see his girlfriend. We also saw a few guys sent down the road not so voluntarily. Our job, after a day's training, consisted of ridding the forest of various wild gooseberry plants of the genus ``ribes." These were alternate hosts to the white pine blister rust, which tended to kill white pine forests. I remember one of the plants, which smelled very much like a skunk, was the ribes petulari. Anyway, we had ``hodags" (sort of a combination hoe and pickax) with which to dig up these plants root and all. We each had an ``acre" to work each day. The acres were roped off and designated by the asst. camp boss (the first asst. was a cross country guy from U. of Tenn; he was shifted to another camp later and my friend who had been up there the year before became our asst. camp boss...he was 25 or 26 years old and a Korean War vet). We also had checkers, experienced at the job, who came along behind us and checked the area we had worked. If the checker found one unkilled ribes plant on your acre, you had to go back and work it again. This was hard work, involving a lot of walking up and down small mountains, through the swampy areas between mountains and fighting your way through dense undergrowth.It also was hot work. One big dumb kid disobeyed Dirty Ed's orders to keep your shirt on in the field, and was delivered to us as an example of why. He was one huge blister from neck to waist. Ugliest thing I ever saw. See, there was nothing but thin air between us and the sun at that altitude. The other dangers involved animals (we had porcupines and bears to avoid, but no snakes up there) and learning things like not to fill your canteen downstream from some grazing sheep. For respite, we got Saturdays and Sunday off (unless we worked Saturday at time and a half) Oh, the base pay was minimum wage, as I recall about $1.50 an hour, from which was deducted our food at the camp (and the food WAS good and plentiful). We rode into camp on Ed's truck, or with our asst. camp boss, who had his Chevy up there. One trip in the Chevy we came face to face with a moose standing in the middle of the dirt road. We stayed in the car, he remained huge, and finally he moved on. In town there was little to do. Headquarters consisted of a small hotel (rooms $2 a night), an ice cream parlor, two or three stores that mainly sold and repaired chain saws, and about 6 or 8 saloons. Being mostly underage, we naturally opted for the saloons. One memorable day in town, a kid at our camp (he was 16, from Oklahoma, and had lied about his age to get the job) got drunk and we saw him being dragged down the street by the collar by the town law. Another time we were in a saloon where Junior Kramer was pointed out to me. Junior was like a block of pigiron and had a local reputation. I saw why when the town law came to Junior's booth to talk to him about something. Without rising from his seat, Junior reach up with his big fist and cold-cocked the town law, leaving him unconscious on the floor and continuing his (Junior's) conversation with his friends. This impressed me. The saloons were really like old west saloons in the movies. A long bar, tables where grizzled guys sat playing poker, etc. We flatland college kids had adjusted to all this by late August. The job didn't seem so difficult. We had figured out that while alcohol was verboten in camp, we could smuggle in a six pack from town and keep it cold in a creek nearby, to be surreptiously enjoyed in the evenings. Everyone drank Olympia beer. Some guys had even located the easy girls in town. Then we got a day's training in fighting forest fires, Do's and don'ts. And sure `nuff, at Labor Day, we were called out as the cleanup for a forest fire 30-40 miles away in the national forest (paid double time for that). Trucked in, we slept that night in the open, in the rain, and in 33-degree weather. Then we spent a day locating fires that still burned under stumps and so forth. One of our number, a really nice guy from Coffeyville, Kan. (he ran track at the JC there) forgot to check above and behind him while using an axe. The axe was caught by a branch, and came down onto his leg, almost severing it. He was taken to hospital and we never saw him again. Thus I lost one of my two chess opponents. A couple of days later the job was over. One friend and I rode the train from Orofino to Spokane and on to Denver, where my folks met us. It was the closest I came to military service. It was overall a great experience. I managed to save a couple hundred dollars for the coming college year. I came back in the best shape of my life. And I have always wondered what became of Dirty Ed Ogden.
  19. 3 points
    and reading about the start of practice and the outlook for coverage of the next few weeks of August camp, and then the season, and I am reminded of how much has changed. These guys may get to see 3 or 4 workouts this month and occasionally get to hear what CGP has to say after a workout. Considering that they are kept at arm's length, they do a darn good job. But in another era long ago for both football and reporting, the beat writer on TCU football (and I speak particularly of the Fred Taylor/Pittman-Tohill/Shofner years, with a little of the Dry era thrown in) would spend 2-3 hours each afternoon, Monday through Thursday, on the sidelines at practice, come hot weather or cold. He could also spend some time most days prowling around the coaches' offices, dropping in and learning what he could, swapping stories, etc. If he wanted to do a feature story on a player, he would catch the player in the locker room before practice and chat with him, and probably also talk to the player's position coach, or the head coach to flesh out the story. More than one assistant coach during those years would jokingly address me as ``Coach" because I was always there. Tohill assistant Jerry Boudreaux still called me ``Coach" years later. Sometimes it paid off in unusual ways. For instance, in 1970, the Frogs were about to start practice for the coming Baylor game. I sat in the tiny office occupied by offensive assistants Marvin Lasater and Ted Plumb. They had noticed something in the Baylor film and had drawn up a quarterback draw play, in which the QB (Steve Judy at the time) would take the snap under center, drop back a step and then simply run up the middle of the field, largely unaccompanied. I told them there was no way that could work. They said to watch and see. Sure enough, as drawn up, the Frog RBs (it was a split backfield) each flared out into a flat, the Baylor LBs took off after them, the Frogs blocked the nose guard (almost everyone played some kind of 5-man line at the time) and Judy, a decent runner but no speed demon, went something like 75 yards straight down the field for a touchdown. I doubt somehow that any writer these days, at any Div. 1 school, could have that degree of access, and that sort of experience watching a play go from paper to blackboard to the field ... and to the end zone.
  20. 2 points
    It was a humbling close to the season for DUSHEE, who did a rotten job predicting bowl outcomes after a pretty good regular season. DUSHEE did no better picking winners than the quarter in your pocket would have done. The only solace is, DUSHEE did about as well as Sagarin and SRS at picking winners straight up, although both Sagarin and SRS did quite a bit better against the spread. And the solace for all was that all the models did significantly better than Vegas did with their opening lines set back in early December. Here is how the models did: Model SU ATS DUSHEE O 19 - 19 20 - 18 DUSHEE XC 18 - 20 18 - 20 Sagarin 19 - 19 27 - 11 SRS 19 - 19 25 - 13 Vegas 15 - 23 If you bet using Sagarin or SRS, you made out pretty well during bowl season. If you used DUSHEE, well, let me reiterate that gambling is a vice and the author does not promote or encourage sports betting of any kind. Now my high school football coaches, forever wise, once taught me that excuses are like assholes and elbows ... everybody's got them and mine stink. I'm not sure why my elbows smelled so badly, but I can nonetheless offer a few qualitative reasons for why the bowls are hard to pick. One, in the modern era where NFL hopefuls sit out the bowls, it is easy to argue that not all the teams have the same talent level they had when their regular season performance was measured. One can imagine a way of trying to account for this similar to the WAR metric used in baseball, but ain't nobody got time for that. West Virginia and Michigan both took pretty big hits to their personnel so it was quite predictable they would underperform compared to the regular season. Two, is impossible to quantify the motivation teams have going into exhibition games that the CFP has probably made even less relevant than they used to be. I mean, OBVIOUSLY the SEC was totally not into their games against opponents from all those other slummy conferences ... All of that said, Sagarin and SRS also were only accounting for regular season performance and they did quite well picking winners against the spread. But then, DUSHEE did quite well during the regular season. And DUSHEE has done much better in other bowl seasons. So I'm going to dismiss this bowl season as a fluke. Dealers' prerogative ... Best and Worst Bowl Performances Top 6 59.87 Army vs. Houston 52.38 Texas A&M vs. NC State 52.37 Auburn vs. Purdue 51.88 Clemson vs. Alabama 51.38 Utah State vs. N. Texas 49.09 Clemson vs. Notre Dame I posted the top 6 just to show how friggin' impressive Clemson was in the two playoff games, averaging 50 point better than an average team against, supposedly, two of the four best teams in the country. Bottom 3 -46.27 Purdue vs. Auburn -43.17 Houston vs. Army -39.03 Temple vs. Duke Conference Ratings The Big XII-II leapt back over the B1G as the second best conference in college football, after what was by all accounts a pretty mediocre year for the conference. Despite the relatively poor bowl showing, the SEC is still well ahead of everybody else. The only reason why the ACC had a positive number was because Clemson was in the conference, otherwise the conference only marginally better than the MWC. And the American ends up behind the Mountain West as the best "Group of 5." Please change your marketing campaign, American Athletic Conference ... SEC 10.19 B12 3.94 B10 3.58 ACC 1.41 P12 0.65 MWC -2.60 AAC -4.87 CUSA -5.98 SBC -6.41 MAC -6.43 Final Overall Ratings Post-Bowl Final Rank Team PD YD Score Rk +/- Score +/- 1 Clemson 35.47 262.13 36.32 1 2.11 2 Alabama 33.01 259.46 34.55 -1 -2.44 3 Georgia 22.37 165.34 22.91 0 -3.11 4 Michigan 18.94 183.43 21.49 0 -2.84 5 Oklahoma 19.63 157.55 20.71 0 0.07 6 Mississippi St. 17.35 157.05 19.16 0 -0.03 7 Ohio St. 16.89 141.68 18.11 0 -1.02 8 Texas A&M 15.46 160.18 18.05 4 2.57 9 Utah St. 19.53 75.39 16.67 12 3.23 10 LSU 15.13 115.89 15.69 8 1.91 11 Notre Dame 15.97 98.58 15.41 -2 -1.63 12 Boise St. 15.15 106.73 15.26 1 -0.01 13 Fresno St. 16.65 85.75 15.24 1 -0.03 14 Penn St. 15.47 96.83 15.00 -3 -0.87 15 UCF 17.93 61.56 14.93 -7 -3.38 16 Appalachian State 15.92 88.73 14.90 1 0.71 17 Missouri 13.59 106.57 14.21 -7 -2.44 18 Army 14.97 79.70 13.84 10 4.33 19 West Virginia 12.96 93.55 13.16 -4 -1.68 20 Iowa 14.37 73.48 13.13 -1 -0.46 21 Cincinnati 11.90 97.98 12.67 -5 -1.89 22 Ohio 12.81 84.73 12.63 1 0.57 23 Washington 11.03 105.02 12.43 1 0.43 24 Florida 12.27 78.59 11.98 3 1.39 25 Washington St. 11.78 79.28 11.68 -5 -1.84 26 Auburn 12.69 57.28 11.23 4 3.19 27 Utah 9.90 66.97 9.84 -2 -1.84 28 Wisconsin 7.27 82.38 8.83 7 2.21 29 N.C. State 7.83 72.62 8.73 -7 -3.45 30 Texas 8.67 41.63 7.80 4 1.06 31 Kentucky 9.29 30.33 7.66 0 -0.32 32 UAB 5.97 68.35 7.28 4 1.18 33 Syracuse 8.23 23.92 6.64 5 0.63 34 Iowa St. 6.97 37.11 6.44 7 0.97 35 Temple 7.01 25.27 5.89 -9 -5.33 36 BYU 4.47 58.39 5.80 10 1.77 37 Michigan St. 4.60 54.94 5.72 0 -0.36 38 Miami (FL) 4.67 53.72 5.71 -9 -2.51 39 Oklahoma St. 5.20 30.41 4.94 4 0.10 40 Buffalo 4.72 36.44 4.91 -1 -1.08 41 North Texas 4.08 45.21 4.90 -9 -2.13 42 Virginia 4.08 20.27 3.70 16 1.63 43 Florida Atlantic -0.01 72.62 3.50 2 -0.88 44 Marshall 2.80 33.07 3.46 7 0.45 45 South Carolina 4.16 7.72 3.15 -5 -2.41 46 Purdue 3.48 12.33 2.91 -13 -4.10 47 Memphis 3.20 13.44 2.78 -5 -2.20 48 Middle Tenn. St. 2.13 23.66 2.56 -1 -1.03 49 Oregon 3.67 0.85 2.49 -1 -1.09 50 Arizona St. 3.30 5.87 2.48 2 -0.49 51 Arkansas St. 0.04 50.07 2.45 2 -0.08 52 Minnesota 3.33 3.47 2.39 13 1.40 53 Air Force 0.85 32.07 2.12 6 0.26 54 Stanford 5.48 -32.83 2.07 -10 -2.38 55 Pittsburgh 2.35 8.36 1.97 1 -0.26 56 Southern Miss -1.09 54.96 1.93 7 0.40 57 Miami (OH) 2.31 7.75 1.91 3 0.11 58 Nebraska -0.77 45.03 1.67 -1 -0.55 59 Texas Tech 1.51 12.97 1.64 -5 -0.78 60 Troy 2.27 1.76 1.60 8 1.28 61 Duke 2.30 -11.77 0.96 23 4.32 62 Georgia Tech 0.33 14.09 0.90 -12 -2.20 63 Vanderbilt 3.22 -26.28 0.88 -14 -2.32 64 Boston Coll. 2.76 -21.81 0.79 -9 -1.50 65 Northwestern 2.93 -27.52 0.62 2 0.26 66 Georgia Southern 4.13 -46.29 0.52 5 0.50 67 Toledo 3.02 -31.75 0.48 -5 -1.16 68 TCU -0.96 22.43 0.45 -2 -0.27 69 Maryland 1.26 -8.90 0.41 -5 -0.74 70 Mississippi -3.70 49.63 -0.07 0 -0.12 71 Arizona -4.60 50.71 -0.62 -2 -0.81 72 Wyoming -1.23 2.89 -0.68 1 -0.22 73 East. Michigan -0.07 -15.96 -0.82 -1 -0.84 74 Florida Intl. 0.20 -31.34 -1.38 4 0.55 75 USC -1.54 -10.27 -1.52 -1 -0.77 76 San Diego St. -2.08 -14.21 -2.08 -1 -1.18 77 Nevada -2.90 -7.62 -2.30 0 -0.57 78 Houston -0.92 -36.67 -2.39 -17 -4.15 79 Baylor -4.33 9.21 -2.44 6 1.07 80 California -2.35 -20.69 -2.57 -1 -0.49 81 Wake Forest -2.22 -23.85 -2.64 8 1.67 82 Tulane -3.45 -10.41 -2.81 5 1.20 83 Northern Illinois -1.79 -33.65 -2.82 -7 -1.35 84 Indiana -4.38 -5.50 -3.19 -4 -0.65 85 UCLA -4.24 -12.64 -3.44 -3 -0.74 86 Louisiana Tech -5.24 -0.94 -3.54 5 1.63 87 Colorado -5.83 -4.53 -4.10 -1 -0.49 88 Kansas St. -1.90 -64.13 -4.37 0 -0.29 89 Virginia Tech -4.52 -32.81 -4.60 3 1.41 90 LA Lafayette -5.78 -27.09 -5.17 -9 -2.48 91 Tennessee -4.90 -42.55 -5.32 -1 -0.82 92 W. Michigan -9.27 12.76 -5.56 -9 -2.42 93 UNC-Charlotte -9.03 -10.65 -6.54 1 -0.03 94 Florida St. -8.60 -37.17 -7.53 -1 -1.06 95 North Carolina -10.82 -33.00 -8.81 4 -0.34 96 Kansas -7.64 -78.21 -8.88 4 -0.17 97 Hawaii -8.45 -69.25 -8.98 0 -0.87 98 South Florida -9.38 -61.55 -9.23 -3 -1.68 99 LA Monroe -10.52 -47.43 -9.31 2 0.24 100 Navy -7.57 -90.52 -9.43 -2 -1.18 101 SMU -8.19 -85.39 -9.59 -5 -1.56 102 Ball St. -10.36 -85.40 -11.04 0 -0.75 103 Arkansas -13.51 -50.63 -11.46 0 -0.40 104 Tulsa -12.64 -98.23 -13.18 1 -0.80 105 West. Kentucky -13.14 -94.54 -13.33 2 0.37 106 East Carolina -16.70 -45.95 -13.35 -2 -1.66 107 Colorado St. -16.25 -54.51 -13.47 -1 0.13 108 UNLV -13.93 -109.27 -14.57 0 -0.21 109 Liberty -13.31 -121.99 -14.77 3 0.68 110 Coastal Carolina -13.48 -121.23 -14.85 -1 -0.22 111 Old Dominion -16.90 -95.55 -15.88 0 -0.51 112 Georgia State -15.65 -115.36 -16.01 -2 -0.85 113 Massachusetts -17.91 -118.54 -17.67 1 0.06 114 New Mexico -14.33 -170.05 -17.78 2 0.22 115 Akron -15.20 -159.55 -17.85 -2 -0.35 116 Rutgers -17.66 -133.64 -18.23 -1 -0.32 117 Texas St. -17.86 -138.34 -18.60 0 -0.12 118 Illinois -18.82 -128.23 -18.75 0 -0.23 119 Cent. Michigan -19.07 -137.17 -19.34 0 -0.63 120 Bowling Green -20.79 -116.78 -19.51 0 -0.55 121 South Alabama -20.30 -127.04 -19.68 0 -0.03 122 Kent St. -20.51 -134.36 -20.17 0 -0.21 123 San Jose St. -17.05 -190.29 -20.57 2 0.05 124 UTEP -21.31 -136.87 -20.83 0 -0.31 125 Oregon St. -21.26 -140.68 -20.98 -2 -0.67 126 Rice -21.77 -163.45 -22.41 1 -0.37 127 Louisville -24.13 -131.13 -22.43 -1 -0.87 128 UT-San Antonio -19.89 -209.07 -23.37 0 0.09 129 New Mexico St. -23.98 -154.79 -23.47 0 0.52 130 Connecticut -32.24 -274.71 -34.78 0 -0.90 By Conference AAC 15 UCF 17.93 61.56 14.93 21 Cincinnati 11.90 97.98 12.67 35 Temple 7.01 25.27 5.89 47 Memphis 3.20 13.44 2.78 78 Houston -0.92 -36.67 -2.39 82 Tulane -3.45 -10.41 -2.81 98 South Florida -9.38 -61.55 -9.23 100 Navy -7.57 -90.52 -9.43 101 SMU -8.19 -85.39 -9.59 104 Tulsa -12.64 -98.23 -13.18 106 East Carolina -16.70 -45.95 -13.35 130 Connecticut -32.24 -274.71 -34.78 ACC 1 Clemson 35.47 262.13 36.32 29 N.C. State 7.83 72.62 8.73 33 Syracuse 8.23 23.92 6.64 38 Miami (FL) 4.67 53.72 5.71 42 Virginia 4.08 20.27 3.70 55 Pittsburgh 2.35 8.36 1.97 61 Duke 2.30 -11.77 0.96 62 Georgia Tech 0.33 14.09 0.90 64 Boston Coll. 2.76 -21.81 0.79 81 Wake Forest -2.22 -23.85 -2.64 89 Virginia Tech -4.52 -32.81 -4.60 94 Florida St. -8.60 -37.17 -7.53 95 North Carolina -10.82 -33.00 -8.81 127 Louisville -24.13 -131.13 -22.43 B1G 4 Michigan 18.94 183.43 21.49 7 Ohio St. 16.89 141.68 18.11 14 Penn St. 15.47 96.83 15.00 20 Iowa 14.37 73.48 13.13 28 Wisconsin 7.27 82.38 8.83 37 Michigan St. 4.60 54.94 5.72 46 Purdue 3.48 12.33 2.91 52 Minnesota 3.33 3.47 2.39 58 Nebraska -0.77 45.03 1.67 65 Northwestern 2.93 -27.52 0.62 69 Maryland 1.26 -8.90 0.41 84 Indiana -4.38 -5.50 -3.19 116 Rutgers -17.66 -133.64 -18.23 118 Illinois -18.82 -128.23 -18.75 BXII-II 5 Oklahoma 19.63 157.55 20.71 19 West Virginia 12.96 93.55 13.16 30 Texas 8.67 41.63 7.80 34 Iowa St. 6.97 37.11 6.44 39 Oklahoma St. 5.20 30.41 4.94 59 Texas Tech 1.51 12.97 1.64 68 TCU -0.96 22.43 0.45 79 Baylor -4.33 9.21 -2.44 88 Kansas St. -1.90 -64.13 -4.37 96 Kansas -7.64 -78.21 -8.88 CUSA 32 UAB 5.97 68.35 7.28 41 North Texas 4.08 45.21 4.90 43 Florida Atlantic -0.01 72.62 3.50 44 Marshall 2.80 33.07 3.46 48 Middle Tenn. St. 2.13 23.66 2.56 56 Southern Miss -1.09 54.96 1.93 74 Florida Intl. 0.20 -31.34 -1.38 86 Louisiana Tech -5.24 -0.94 -3.54 93 UNC-Charlotte -9.03 -10.65 -6.54 105 West. Kentucky -13.14 -94.54 -13.33 111 Old Dominion -16.90 -95.55 -15.88 124 UTEP -21.31 -136.87 -20.83 126 Rice -21.77 -163.45 -22.41 128 UT-San Antonio -19.89 -209.07 -23.37 Indies 11 Notre Dame 15.97 98.58 15.41 18 Army 14.97 79.70 13.84 36 BYU 4.47 58.39 5.80 109 Liberty -13.31 -121.99 -14.77 113 Massachusetts -17.91 -118.54 -17.67 129 New Mexico St. -23.98 -154.79 -23.47 MAC 22 Ohio 12.81 84.73 12.63 40 Buffalo 4.72 36.44 4.91 57 Miami (OH) 2.31 7.75 1.91 67 Toledo 3.02 -31.75 0.48 73 East. Michigan -0.07 -15.96 -0.82 83 Northern Illinois -1.79 -33.65 -2.82 92 W. Michigan -9.27 12.76 -5.56 102 Ball St. -10.36 -85.40 -11.04 115 Akron -15.20 -159.55 -17.85 119 Cent. Michigan -19.07 -137.17 -19.34 120 Bowling Green -20.79 -116.78 -19.51 122 Kent St. -20.51 -134.36 -20.17 MWC 9 Utah St. 19.53 75.39 16.67 12 Boise St. 15.15 106.73 15.26 13 Fresno St. 16.65 85.75 15.24 53 Air Force 0.85 32.07 2.12 72 Wyoming -1.23 2.89 -0.68 76 San Diego St. -2.08 -14.21 -2.08 77 Nevada -2.90 -7.62 -2.30 97 Hawaii -8.45 -69.25 -8.98 107 Colorado St. -16.25 -54.51 -13.47 108 UNLV -13.93 -109.27 -14.57 114 New Mexico -14.33 -170.05 -17.78 123 San Jose St. -17.05 -190.29 -20.57 P12 23 Washington 11.03 105.02 12.43 25 Washington St. 11.78 79.28 11.68 27 Utah 9.90 66.97 9.84 49 Oregon 3.67 0.85 2.49 50 Arizona St. 3.30 5.87 2.48 54 Stanford 5.48 -32.83 2.07 71 Arizona -4.60 50.71 -0.62 75 USC -1.54 -10.27 -1.52 80 California -2.35 -20.69 -2.57 85 UCLA -4.24 -12.64 -3.44 87 Colorado -5.83 -4.53 -4.10 125 Oregon St. -21.26 -140.68 -20.98 SBC 16 Appalachian State 15.92 88.73 14.90 51 Arkansas St. 0.04 50.07 2.45 60 Troy 2.27 1.76 1.60 66 Georgia Southern 4.13 -46.29 0.52 90 LA Lafayette -5.78 -27.09 -5.17 99 LA Monroe -10.52 -47.43 -9.31 110 Coastal Carolina -13.48 -121.23 -14.85 112 Georgia State -15.65 -115.36 -16.01 117 Texas St. -17.86 -138.34 -18.60 121 South Alabama -20.30 -127.04 -19.68 SEC 2 Alabama 33.01 259.46 34.55 3 Georgia 22.37 165.34 22.91 6 Mississippi St. 17.35 157.05 19.16 8 Texas A&M 15.46 160.18 18.05 10 LSU 15.13 115.89 15.69 17 Missouri 13.59 106.57 14.21 24 Florida 12.27 78.59 11.98 26 Auburn 12.69 57.28 11.23 31 Kentucky 9.29 30.33 7.66 45 South Carolina 4.16 7.72 3.15 63 Vanderbilt 3.22 -26.28 0.88 70 Mississippi -3.70 49.63 -0.07 91 Tennessee -4.90 -42.55 -5.32 103 Arkansas -13.51 -50.63 -11.46
  21. 2 points
    Army-Navy has been played, closing out the 2018 regular season. Not to be Debbie Downer, but it has been a turd of a season, both as a TCU fan and a college football fan. The Frogs, albeit showing some guts in getting through Baylor and Oklahoma State to get to the Cheez-It, had a disappointing season. Alabama and Clemson are, for the 15th year in a row, the odds on favorites to make the NC game and the underdog challengers are two of the usuals themselves. Same old, same old. I don't think UCF is one of the 4 best teams in the country, but I'd be a hell of a lot more interested in the CFP if they were in the tournament. But luckily for all you TFH subscribers, you have DUSHEE to keep you keen and interested. None of the Top 12 moved in the rankings. The gap tightened between Bama and Clemson, now with less than 3-points separating the top two teams. NC-State fans can shelter from their Snowmageddon warmed by the solace that they rose the most in the rankings this week, riding their 55-point blowout of East Carolina to an 8-spot and over 4-point rise in DUSHEE to get back into the top 25. ECU, conversely, experienced the largest drop, falling 10 spots and 4.5 points. UConn sealed the bottom spot, almost 10 points worse than New Mexico State. To give you a sense of how bad UConn was this year, their TOP rated DUSHEE performance all season was in Week 1 in a 39-point loss to UCF. They earned a -16.15 DUSHEE score for that performance. And that was as good as they did all year. TCU's week-to-week hasn't really changed much since I posted their numbers in the Week 13 blog post (Ohio State went up a little, UT and OU went down a little), and Cal's numbers are in the Bowl Preview. So we'll jump to the Best and Worst Performers. It is a pretty rare circumstance for the loser of a game to wind up in the top performers for the week, but Georgia did that in earning a 34.15 DUSHEE score while losing to Alabama by a TD. It is not all that uncommon for a losing team to get a better score than a winning team; generally happening when a bad team keeps a game close against a good team. I know this is a hard concept for many to wrap their brains around when in the traditional AP poll mindset ... the team that loses must drop! But the goal of DUSHEE is to measure the relative strength of the teams, so if a good team goes into a game, say, 13 points better than another team, but only beats them by 7, that is an indication that the gap between those two teams isn't as large as was originally thought. And that is what happened in the Georgia-Alabama game. Georgia went in as a 13-point underdog (per DUSHEE) against the best team in the country. They lost to that team by 7 and outgained them by almost 60. And that is the big flaw in the AP poll. When two teams who are close to each other in the rankings play a close game, there is no reason to change their rankings relative to each other. That is an indication that you had them ranked correctly to begin with. There is no need to punish the loser by dropping them in the rankings. Statistically, the teams were about even. So despite losing, Georgia crept closer to Alabama, closing their gap with the Tide by a little more than 2 points. Championship Week Top 3 Performers 55.96 -- NC State vs. ECU (55 MOV, 544 YM) 34.15 -- Georgia vs. Alabama (-7 MOV, 59 YM) 29.99 -- Clemson vs. Pitt (32 MOV, 229 YM) Championship Week Bottom 3 Performers -54.55 ECU at NCSU (-55 MOV, -544 YM) -24.20 Akron at South Carolina (-25 MOV, -134 YM) -20.51 Marshall at VaTech (-21 MOV, 16 YM) And since we are in year-end mode, let's track down the top and bottom 10 performances for the whole year. 2018 Season Top 10 63.66 - Clemson at Wake (60 MOV, 449 YM) (Week 6) 55.96 - NC State vs. E. Carolina (55 MOV, 544 YM) (Week 14) 53.97 - Ohio vs. Buffalo (35 MOV, 364 YM) (Week 12) 53.84 - Oklahoma vs. Fla. Atlantic (49 MOV, 326 YM) (Week 1) 53.38 - Alabama vs. Arkansas St. (50 MOV, 208 YM) (Week 2) 52.38 - Alabama at Mississippi (55 MOV, 269 YM) (Week 3) 51.54 - Michigan vs. Penn St. (35 MOV, 219 YM) (Week 10) 51.43 - Mississippi vs. La-Monroe (49 MOV, 399 YM) (Week 6) 51.42 - Alabama vs. Missouri (29 MOV, 352 YM) (Week 7) 50.54 - Clemson vs. Ga. Southern (31 MOV, 455 YM) (Week 3) 2018 Season Bottom 10 -62.98 UNLV vs. New Mexico (-36 MOV, -336 YM) (Week 6) -59.78 La-Monroe at Mississippi (-49 MOV, -399 YM) (Week 6) -58.71 UConn at E. Carolina (-34 MOV, -383 YM) (Week 12) -57.87 UConn at Boise St. (-55 MOV, -629 YM) (Week 2) -57.81 Liberty at Auburn (-53 MOV, -397 YM) (Week 12) -57.46 Old Dominion at Liberty (-42 MOV, -290) (Week 1) -56.58 Duke vs. Wake (-52 MOV, -266 YM) (Week 13) -54.55 E. Carolina at NC State (-55 MOV, -544 YM) (Week 14) -53.82 Texas St. at Rutgers (-28 MOV, -247 YM) (Week 1) -52.84 Rutgers at Kansas (-41 MOV, -270 YM) (Week 3) Overall Ratings Regular Season Final Rank Team PD YD Score Rk +/- Score +/- 1 Alabama 36.16 265.88 36.99 0 -1.30 2 Clemson 33.17 249.73 34.21 0 0.26 3 Georgia 25.54 185.56 26.02 0 0.91 4 Michigan 21.99 199.80 24.34 0 -0.14 5 Oklahoma 19.62 155.95 20.64 0 -0.41 6 Mississippi St. 18.01 148.26 19.19 0 -0.36 7 Ohio St. 17.57 153.04 19.13 0 0.33 8 UCF 20.28 98.78 18.30 0 -0.20 9 Notre Dame 17.32 113.45 17.04 0 -0.21 10 Missouri 16.75 113.10 16.65 0 -0.53 11 Penn St. 16.80 96.26 15.87 0 -0.35 12 Texas A&M 12.83 143.03 15.48 0 -0.25 13 Boise St. 15.06 108.02 15.27 2 0.13 14 Fresno St. 16.86 83.18 15.27 -1 -0.22 15 West Virginia 15.01 99.66 14.84 2 -0.22 16 Cincinnati 13.53 114.34 14.56 0 -0.58 17 Appalachian State 14.65 91.41 14.19 -3 -1.10 18 LSU 14.17 89.52 13.78 0 -0.51 19 Iowa 14.34 83.19 13.59 0 -0.16 20 Washington St. 12.64 105.29 13.53 0 -0.19 21 Utah St. 16.49 50.55 13.44 0 -0.11 22 N.C. State 11.35 95.12 12.17 8 4.15 23 Ohio 12.04 83.43 12.07 0 -0.20 24 Washington 10.97 96.78 12.00 1 0.52 25 Utah 12.05 75.17 11.68 -3 -1.06 26 Temple 11.81 69.03 11.22 -2 -0.66 27 Florida 10.67 71.65 10.59 0 0.01 28 Army 10.30 54.54 9.51 -2 -1.83 29 Miami (FL) 7.45 67.37 8.23 0 -0.09 30 Auburn 9.75 31.94 8.05 -2 -0.49 31 Kentucky 9.24 37.67 7.99 0 0.02 32 North Texas 5.99 62.68 7.03 1 -0.13 33 Purdue 7.40 43.03 7.02 -1 -0.16 34 Texas 7.86 31.00 6.74 1 -0.12 35 Wisconsin 5.05 67.14 6.62 1 -0.16 36 UAB 4.88 58.86 6.10 1 -0.63 37 Michigan St. 5.34 52.01 6.08 1 -0.13 38 Syracuse 7.26 24.38 6.02 1 0.22 39 Buffalo 5.67 45.55 5.98 -5 -1.05 40 South Carolina 6.74 21.90 5.55 2 0.20 41 Iowa St. 6.93 17.59 5.47 -1 -0.27 42 Memphis 4.87 35.71 4.98 -1 -0.59 43 Oklahoma St. 4.46 38.56 4.84 0 -0.33 44 Stanford 7.44 -10.58 4.45 1 -0.18 45 Florida Atlantic 0.92 77.85 4.38 1 -0.24 46 BYU 2.80 44.73 4.04 1 -0.27 47 Middle Tenn. St. 3.78 22.12 3.59 3 0.38 48 Oregon 4.30 14.64 3.58 0 -0.19 49 Vanderbilt 5.72 -12.73 3.20 2 0.05 50 Georgia Tech 2.66 27.52 3.10 -1 -0.26 51 Marshall 2.50 27.90 3.02 -7 -1.78 52 Arizona St. 3.57 12.37 2.98 0 -0.14 53 Arkansas St. 1.11 37.01 2.53 0 -0.40 54 Texas Tech 2.39 16.94 2.41 0 -0.19 55 Boston Coll. 4.24 -11.06 2.29 7 0.69 56 Pittsburgh 2.95 5.45 2.23 1 -0.06 57 Nebraska -0.34 50.34 2.21 -1 -0.15 58 Virginia 2.29 11.10 2.07 5 0.46 59 Air Force 0.49 31.57 1.86 0 -0.12 60 Miami (OH) 2.12 8.06 1.80 -2 -0.35 61 Houston 3.50 -11.79 1.76 -6 -0.69 62 Toledo 3.85 -19.18 1.64 -1 -0.20 63 Southern Miss -1.42 51.01 1.53 -3 -0.33 64 Maryland 1.99 -3.64 1.15 1 -0.11 65 Minnesota 1.67 -2.49 0.99 -1 -0.29 66 TCU -0.84 26.43 0.72 0 -0.15 67 Northwestern 2.21 -22.92 0.36 0 -0.45 68 Troy 1.09 -8.41 0.32 0 -0.25 69 Arizona -3.90 57.62 0.19 0 -0.20 70 Mississippi -3.37 47.31 0.05 2 -0.05 71 Georgia Southern 4.27 -58.39 0.02 0 -0.12 72 East. Michigan 0.15 -1.70 0.02 -2 -0.18 73 Wyoming -1.03 4.54 -0.47 0 -0.25 74 USC -0.86 -3.67 -0.75 0 -0.25 75 San Diego St. -0.90 -6.00 -0.89 0 -0.23 76 Northern Illinois -0.45 -24.20 -1.47 3 0.89 77 Nevada -3.26 9.03 -1.73 -1 -0.27 78 Florida Intl. -0.15 -37.79 -1.93 -1 -0.18 79 California -1.89 -16.97 -2.08 -1 -0.18 80 Indiana -3.72 -1.17 -2.54 1 0.03 81 LA Lafayette -3.58 -6.27 -2.69 6 0.87 82 UCLA -3.50 -7.63 -2.70 -2 -0.33 83 W. Michigan -7.03 31.77 -3.15 0 0.03 84 Duke -1.51 -48.52 -3.36 -2 -0.27 85 Baylor -5.51 3.40 -3.51 0 -0.17 86 Colorado -5.36 -0.83 -3.61 0 -0.18 87 Tulane -4.21 -24.74 -4.01 -3 -0.78 88 Kansas St. -1.47 -64.02 -4.08 0 -0.16 89 Wake Forest -3.23 -44.28 -4.30 1 0.28 90 Tennessee -3.93 -38.75 -4.50 -1 -0.24 91 Louisiana Tech -6.29 -20.28 -5.17 0 -0.10 92 Virginia Tech -5.72 -45.49 -6.02 6 2.35 93 Florida St. -7.66 -28.17 -6.47 2 0.74 94 UNC-Charlotte -8.89 -11.94 -6.50 -2 -0.36 95 South Florida -7.77 -48.87 -7.55 -2 -0.53 96 SMU -6.68 -73.89 -8.03 0 -0.20 97 Hawaii -8.07 -56.48 -8.12 0 -0.12 98 Navy -6.57 -79.94 -8.25 3 0.68 99 North Carolina -10.42 -31.50 -8.47 0 -0.09 100 Kansas -7.39 -77.96 -8.70 0 -0.18 101 LA Monroe -10.74 -49.29 -9.55 1 -0.02 102 Ball St. -9.71 -78.83 -10.29 1 0.04 103 Arkansas -12.82 -51.70 -11.05 1 -0.28 104 East Carolina -15.16 -32.76 -11.70 -10 -4.58 105 Tulsa -11.75 -93.75 -12.37 0 -0.28 106 Colorado St. -16.57 -52.72 -13.60 0 -0.10 107 West. Kentucky -13.37 -99.00 -13.71 0 -0.16 108 UNLV -13.73 -107.53 -14.36 0 -0.13 109 Coastal Carolina -13.16 -120.88 -14.63 0 0.00 110 Georgia State -14.80 -109.38 -15.16 1 0.22 111 Old Dominion -16.27 -93.52 -15.38 -1 -0.45 112 Liberty -14.00 -126.36 -15.45 0 -0.01 113 Akron -14.78 -157.71 -17.50 0 -0.90 114 Massachusetts -17.99 -118.56 -17.74 0 -0.17 115 Rutgers -17.30 -131.61 -17.91 0 -0.18 116 New Mexico -14.47 -172.44 -18.00 0 -0.24 117 Texas St. -17.68 -138.18 -18.48 1 -0.09 118 Illinois -18.66 -125.56 -18.52 -1 -0.17 119 Cent. Michigan -18.47 -132.25 -18.72 0 -0.13 120 Bowling Green -20.31 -111.84 -18.96 0 -0.17 121 South Alabama -20.29 -126.44 -19.65 0 -0.32 122 Kent St. -20.27 -132.98 -19.96 0 -0.14 123 Oregon St. -20.91 -131.45 -20.30 0 0.14 124 UTEP -20.88 -136.14 -20.51 0 -0.07 125 San Jose St. -17.27 -187.97 -20.62 0 -0.13 126 Louisville -23.28 -124.69 -21.56 0 0.27 127 Rice -21.15 -163.87 -22.04 0 -0.07 128 UT-San Antonio -19.89 -210.67 -23.47 0 -0.20 129 New Mexico St. -24.55 -157.34 -23.99 0 0.01 130 Connecticut -31.53 -265.40 -33.88 0 -0.74 By Conference AAC 8 UCF 20.28 98.78 18.30 16 Cincinnati 13.53 114.34 14.56 26 Temple 11.81 69.03 11.22 42 Memphis 4.87 35.71 4.98 61 Houston 3.50 -11.79 1.76 87 Tulane -4.21 -24.74 -4.01 95 South Florida -7.77 -48.87 -7.55 96 SMU -6.68 -73.89 -8.03 98 Navy -6.57 -79.94 -8.25 104 East Carolina -15.16 -32.76 -11.70 105 Tulsa -11.75 -93.75 -12.37 130 Connecticut -31.53 -265.40 -33.88 ACC 2 Clemson 33.17 249.73 34.21 22 N.C. State 11.35 95.12 12.17 29 Miami (FL) 7.45 67.37 8.23 38 Syracuse 7.26 24.38 6.02 50 Georgia Tech 2.66 27.52 3.10 55 Boston Coll. 4.24 -11.06 2.29 56 Pittsburgh 2.95 5.45 2.23 58 Virginia 2.29 11.10 2.07 84 Duke -1.51 -48.52 -3.36 89 Wake Forest -3.23 -44.28 -4.30 92 Virginia Tech -5.72 -45.49 -6.02 93 Florida St. -7.66 -28.17 -6.47 99 North Carolina -10.42 -31.50 -8.47 126 Louisville -23.28 -124.69 -21.56 B1G 4 Michigan 21.99 199.80 24.34 7 Ohio St. 17.57 153.04 19.13 11 Penn St. 16.80 96.26 15.87 19 Iowa 14.34 83.19 13.59 33 Purdue 7.40 43.03 7.02 35 Wisconsin 5.05 67.14 6.62 37 Michigan St. 5.34 52.01 6.08 57 Nebraska -0.34 50.34 2.21 64 Maryland 1.99 -3.64 1.15 65 Minnesota 1.67 -2.49 0.99 67 Northwestern 2.21 -22.92 0.36 80 Indiana -3.72 -1.17 -2.54 115 Rutgers -17.30 -131.61 -17.91 118 Illinois -18.66 -125.56 -18.52 BXII-II 5 Oklahoma 19.62 155.95 20.64 15 West Virginia 15.01 99.66 14.84 34 Texas 7.86 31.00 6.74 41 Iowa St. 6.93 17.59 5.47 43 Oklahoma St. 4.46 38.56 4.84 54 Texas Tech 2.39 16.94 2.41 66 TCU -0.84 26.43 0.72 85 Baylor -5.51 3.40 -3.51 88 Kansas St. -1.47 -64.02 -4.08 100 Kansas -7.39 -77.96 -8.70 CUSA 32 North Texas 5.99 62.68 7.03 36 UAB 4.88 58.86 6.10 45 Florida Atlantic 0.92 77.85 4.38 47 Middle Tenn. St. 3.78 22.12 3.59 51 Marshall 2.50 27.90 3.02 63 Southern Miss -1.42 51.01 1.53 78 Florida Intl. -0.15 -37.79 -1.93 91 Louisiana Tech -6.29 -20.28 -5.17 94 UNC-Charlotte -8.89 -11.94 -6.50 107 West. Kentucky -13.37 -99.00 -13.71 111 Old Dominion -16.27 -93.52 -15.38 124 UTEP -20.88 -136.14 -20.51 127 Rice -21.15 -163.87 -22.04 128 UT-San Antonio -19.89 -210.67 -23.47 Indies 9 Notre Dame 17.32 113.45 17.04 28 Army 10.30 54.54 9.51 46 BYU 2.80 44.73 4.04 112 Liberty -14.00 -126.36 -15.45 114 Massachusetts -17.99 -118.56 -17.74 129 New Mexico St. -24.55 -157.34 -23.99 MAC 23 Ohio 12.04 83.43 12.07 39 Buffalo 5.67 45.55 5.98 60 Miami (OH) 2.12 8.06 1.80 62 Toledo 3.85 -19.18 1.64 72 East. Michigan 0.15 -1.70 0.02 76 Northern Illinois -0.45 -24.20 -1.47 83 W. Michigan -7.03 31.77 -3.15 102 Ball St. -9.71 -78.83 -10.29 113 Akron -14.78 -157.71 -17.50 119 Cent. Michigan -18.47 -132.25 -18.72 120 Bowling Green -20.31 -111.84 -18.96 122 Kent St. -20.27 -132.98 -19.96 MWC 13 Boise St. 15.06 108.02 15.27 14 Fresno St. 16.86 83.18 15.27 21 Utah St. 16.49 50.55 13.44 59 Air Force 0.49 31.57 1.86 73 Wyoming -1.03 4.54 -0.47 75 San Diego St. -0.90 -6.00 -0.89 77 Nevada -3.26 9.03 -1.73 97 Hawaii -8.07 -56.48 -8.12 106 Colorado St. -16.57 -52.72 -13.60 108 UNLV -13.73 -107.53 -14.36 116 New Mexico -14.47 -172.44 -18.00 125 San Jose St. -17.27 -187.97 -20.62 P12 20 Washington St. 12.64 105.29 13.53 24 Washington 10.97 96.78 12.00 25 Utah 12.05 75.17 11.68 44 Stanford 7.44 -10.58 4.45 48 Oregon 4.30 14.64 3.58 52 Arizona St. 3.57 12.37 2.98 69 Arizona -3.90 57.62 0.19 74 USC -0.86 -3.67 -0.75 79 California -1.89 -16.97 -2.08 82 UCLA -3.50 -7.63 -2.70 86 Colorado -5.36 -0.83 -3.61 123 Oregon St. -20.91 -131.45 -20.30 SBC 17 Appalachian State 14.65 91.41 14.19 53 Arkansas St. 1.11 37.01 2.53 68 Troy 1.09 -8.41 0.32 71 Georgia Southern 4.27 -58.39 0.02 81 LA Lafayette -3.58 -6.27 -2.69 101 LA Monroe -10.74 -49.29 -9.55 109 Coastal Carolina -13.16 -120.88 -14.63 110 Georgia State -14.80 -109.38 -15.16 117 Texas St. -17.68 -138.18 -18.48 121 South Alabama -20.29 -126.44 -19.65 SEC 1 Alabama 36.16 265.88 36.99 3 Georgia 25.54 185.56 26.02 6 Mississippi St. 18.01 148.26 19.19 10 Missouri 16.75 113.10 16.65 12 Texas A&M 12.83 143.03 15.48 18 LSU 14.17 89.52 13.78 27 Florida 10.67 71.65 10.59 30 Auburn 9.75 31.94 8.05 31 Kentucky 9.24 37.67 7.99 40 South Carolina 6.74 21.90 5.55 49 Vanderbilt 5.72 -12.73 3.20 70 Mississippi -3.37 47.31 0.05 90 Tennessee -3.93 -38.75 -4.50 103 Arkansas -12.82 -51.70 -11.05
  22. 2 points
    As we've discussed in previous weeks, Alabama and Clemson have been set for some time your clear top 2 (Alabama has retaken the top spot as the two continue to jockey in the rankings). This week, Michigan has begun to separate from the pack as a clear #3 and Oklahoma has now created a little bit of space for itself in #4. Were the season to end today, that is your playoff as far as DUSHEE is concerned. The Frogs dropped again, despite the win, three spots to 50th. DUSHEE has the Frogs as a field goal better than an average team, which is to say, pretty average. DUSHEE does not think Kansas State is a very good team, and the fact that we beat them by one and were outgained, means that DUSHEE didn't think that was a performance worthy of a good team. In fact, DUSHEE has the K-State win as the worst performance of the year for the Frogs. TCU had worse Point Differentials against Texas and Kansas, but when adjusted for a season low Yardage Differential, DUSHEE rated the K-State game as almost 11-points below average. TCU Week-to-Week Opp: @ SMU N OhSt @ Tex | ISU Ttech OU | @ Kan KSU PD: 21.00 7.25 -10.63 | 9.86 1.00 -4.25 | -7.57 -6.43 YD: 61.00 150.50 29.63 |189.00 53.43 -95.00 | 118.00 -135.57 Score: 16.97 12.16 -5.64 | 15.77 3.27 -7.46 | 0.69 -10.88 Perhaps most concerning is that the Frogs are on a pretty clear downward trajectory as the Frogs' best three performances were in their first four games (excluding Southern) and three of their four worst performances have come in the last three weeks. Put another way, the Frogs averaged a DUSHEE score of 9.81 during the first four games of the season and -3.60 during the second four. Which shouldn't make us feel very good going into next week, when we face ... West Virginia Week-to-Week Opp: N Tenn KSU @ Ttech | Kan @ ISU Bay | @ Tex PD: 18.71 25.57 13.57 | 11.86 -11.86 42.71 | 7.38 YD: 206.29 42.71 53.43 | 147.71 -344.71 304.57 | 89.25 Score: 22.51 19.13 11.65 | 15.09 -24.68 43.29 | 9.26 If you are looking for any kind of solace that the Frogs will have a chance this week in Morgantown, I can only offer two rather minor consolations. First, the Mountaineers have played a softer conference slate than the Frogs so far, having not played OU yet and having beaten up on the dregs (Kansas, Kansas State, and Baylor). And for one common opponent, WVU was inexplicably destroyed by Iowa State while we managed to beat the Cyclones before the aforementioned 4-game swoon. If the Frogs and Mountaineers who faced Iowa State show up on Saturday, the Frogs win by 40 points!!! Unfortunately those are not the only two data points we have, and against our other four common opponents, the Fightin' Holgersons have been an average of 17-points better than the Frogs and 14-points better over their last four games. Taking the whole season into account, DUSHEE has the Mountaineers as 14.5-point favorites at Milan Puskar Stadium with a 23% chance of winning. Conference Ratings For the first time this season, the B1G has edged past the BXII-II as the second-best conference in FBS, albeit by a hundredth of a point. Both conferences are well behind the SEC and well ahead of the ever-so mediocre ACC and P12. The American Athletic (AAC) has picked a bad year to market themselves as a "Power" conference as they are now less than a point better than the Mountain West. SEC 10.95 B10 5.77 B12 5.76 ACC 2.65 P12 2.06 AAC -2.72 MWC -3.60 CUSA -6.70 MAC -6.88 SBC -8.15 Week 10 Performances Top 3 50.17 -- Michigan vs. PSU (35 MOV, 219 YM) 48.89 -- Alabama at LSU (29 MOV, 380 YM) 43.60 -- Mississippi St. vs. Louisiana Tech (42 MOV, 294 YM) Bottom 3 -45.17 Minnesota at Illinois (-24 MOV, -208 YM) -44.09 Florida Int'l. vs. Florida Atl. (-35 MOV, -266 YM) -44.39 Georgia So. at Louisiana-Monroe (-19 MOV, -359 YM) Overall Ratings The only thing that changed in the Top 6 is that Alabama and Clemson switched positions at the top. A&M, despite losing, climbed 3 spots to #7, benefitting from larger falls by the B1G trio of Penn State, Ohio State, and Iowa. Big movers at the top this week include UCF and UAB who jumped 13 and 16 spots, respectively, into the top 20. Utah, Texas Tech, and Washington all took big tumbles out of the top 25. The biggest overall gainers were Tulane, who jumped 25 spots in the rankings after destroying USF (DUSHEE was pretty prescient about them if you read my blog post from two weeks ago ...), and Louisiana-Monroe whose DUSHEE score rose 7.26 points after a three-score takedown of Georgia Southern. The biggest overall losers this week, both in terms of ranking position and DUSHEE score were the Golden Gophers of Minnesota who lost over 6 points and dropped 26 spots in the rankings after losing by 24 to a truly terrible Illinois team. Week 10 Rank Team PD YD Score Rk +/- Score +/- 1 Alabama 36.81 294.81 38.88 1 1.12 2 Clemson 37.07 283.53 38.51 -1 -1.19 3 Michigan 28.23 254.75 31.22 0 1.78 4 Oklahoma 23.25 202.68 25.36 0 -0.15 5 Georgia 23.75 123.80 21.86 0 -0.19 6 LSU 19.98 80.74 17.24 0 -3.89 7 Texas A&M 12.26 179.79 16.92 3 -0.03 8 Missouri 16.72 118.62 16.92 6 1.35 9 Ohio St. 15.25 137.37 16.85 -2 -3.12 10 Penn St. 18.25 83.45 16.23 -1 -1.92 11 North Texas 15.19 123.43 16.13 1 0.15 12 Fresno St. 18.49 76.32 16.04 4 1.13 13 Iowa 15.39 115.48 15.88 -5 -2.69 14 Utah St. 19.48 53.40 15.59 8 2.48 15 Mississippi St. 14.43 113.36 15.13 5 1.63 16 N.C. State 13.95 108.70 14.59 -5 -1.56 17 UCF 17.31 62.29 14.57 13 2.60 18 UAB 13.30 115.30 14.48 16 3.56 19 Notre Dame 13.96 102.47 14.29 -1 -0.04 20 Purdue 13.93 94.85 13.90 5 1.38 21 West Virginia 15.42 71.32 13.75 -4 -0.69 22 Temple 12.62 104.31 13.49 -1 0.01 23 Army 14.03 73.96 12.95 -10 -2.78 24 Michigan St. 12.51 84.32 12.44 11 1.91 25 Iowa St. 12.15 87.95 12.38 -6 -1.62 26 Washington St. 9.71 114.11 12.03 3 0.02 27 Appalachian State 12.38 76.68 11.98 -4 -1.05 28 Utah 11.58 79.32 11.58 -13 -3.47 29 Cincinnati 11.46 78.15 11.44 7 3.58 30 Texas Tech 11.31 78.46 11.36 -6 -1.22 31 Boise St. 10.18 85.98 10.97 0 -0.81 32 Kentucky 11.14 60.48 10.37 0 -1.33 33 Washington 9.81 68.30 9.86 -7 -2.57 34 Wisconsin 7.91 84.57 9.39 -1 -1.54 35 Miami (FL) 7.27 83.00 8.88 -8 -3.25 36 Ohio 9.08 56.22 8.79 15 5.47 37 Texas 9.31 46.96 8.49 2 1.03 38 Florida 9.23 32.21 7.72 -10 -4.38 39 Buffalo 7.27 57.36 7.64 1 0.56 40 Arizona St. 6.84 44.98 6.75 12 3.50 41 Boston Coll. 7.10 35.97 6.48 -4 -1.37 42 Stanford 8.17 11.67 6.02 6 0.74 43 Syracuse 7.47 19.11 5.91 -1 -0.33 44 Auburn 6.93 18.48 5.52 -3 -0.96 45 South Carolina 5.32 29.66 4.99 0 -1.01 46 Georgia Tech 3.33 52.68 4.79 4 0.61 47 Mississippi 1.53 67.92 4.33 2 0.04 48 Oklahoma St. 3.20 36.59 3.92 -2 -1.64 49 Nebraska -0.60 83.67 3.67 6 1.03 50 TCU 1.28 46.37 3.11 -3 -2.37 51 BYU 2.34 31.21 3.08 9 1.97 52 Maryland 3.75 5.45 2.77 -8 -3.30 53 Northwestern 3.98 1.70 2.74 0 -0.18 54 Virginia 2.28 13.20 2.16 -11 -3.92 55 Houston 3.45 -3.84 2.11 -17 -5.51 56 Arizona -1.65 62.26 1.93 7 1.55 57 Duke 5.48 -40.15 1.70 2 0.57 58 San Diego St. -0.14 27.43 1.24 6 1.15 59 Florida Atlantic -1.03 37.10 1.12 22 5.06 60 Oregon 0.98 1.20 0.71 2 0.22 61 Air Force 0.69 4.27 0.67 7 1.82 62 Vanderbilt 4.03 -43.54 0.57 -4 -0.60 63 East. Michigan 0.84 -1.00 0.51 2 0.56 64 USC 0.42 -3.22 0.13 -7 -1.47 65 Tulane 1.24 -14.95 0.10 25 5.65 66 Marshall 0.29 -6.08 -0.10 9 2.24 67 Pittsburgh 1.88 -28.20 -0.12 4 1.32 68 Southern Miss -5.63 72.80 -0.21 2 0.95 69 Colorado -2.00 19.34 -0.39 -8 -1.08 70 Toledo 3.09 -52.35 -0.49 10 3.41 71 Memphis -1.24 -8.62 -1.24 6 1.66 72 Miami (OH) -2.20 0.01 -1.47 1 0.31 73 Tennessee -1.33 -16.85 -1.71 -4 -0.56 74 Georgia Southern 3.95 -92.86 -1.89 -18 -4.05 75 Troy -1.99 -13.35 -1.98 3 1.39 76 UCLA -3.43 -3.64 -2.46 -9 -1.50 77 Wyoming -3.69 -6.33 -2.77 7 1.29 78 Arkansas St. -5.35 15.07 -2.83 4 1.16 79 California -4.17 -4.00 -2.97 7 1.47 80 Minnesota -3.62 -20.25 -3.40 -26 -6.08 81 LA Lafayette -4.33 -12.67 -3.50 4 0.70 82 Virginia Tech -3.70 -33.50 -4.09 6 0.74 83 Louisiana Tech -3.81 -37.09 -4.35 -17 -3.81 84 Baylor -4.43 -28.96 -4.36 -1 -0.31 85 East Carolina -10.70 54.16 -4.50 -13 -2.86 86 Indiana -7.10 2.27 -4.62 -12 -2.37 87 SMU -3.43 -52.34 -4.83 14 5.29 88 Middle Tenn. St. -1.77 -77.99 -4.97 7 1.69 89 Northern Illinois -3.49 -55.71 -5.04 0 0.49 90 Nevada -4.51 -50.66 -5.47 2 0.52 91 Arkansas -8.29 0.96 -5.48 2 0.57 92 Kansas St. -2.83 -81.62 -5.85 -1 0.07 93 W. Michigan -9.20 3.25 -5.98 -6 -1.40 94 Florida St. -7.88 -15.35 -6.00 0 0.12 95 Florida Intl. -5.37 -66.28 -6.80 -19 -4.37 96 UNC-Charlotte -10.97 8.19 -6.91 1 0.52 97 South Florida -8.26 -38.23 -7.36 -1 -0.57 98 Liberty -5.96 -72.11 -7.48 -19 -4.00 99 Wake Forest -8.42 -63.68 -8.71 3 1.52 100 North Carolina -11.95 -18.50 -8.87 -2 0.01 101 Coastal Carolina -8.72 -68.64 -9.15 6 2.74 102 Ball St. -10.80 -67.65 -10.49 -2 -0.85 103 Kansas -8.01 -106.65 -10.53 -4 -1.24 104 Tulsa -10.33 -78.58 -10.71 -1 0.13 105 Hawaii -10.56 -93.51 -11.59 -1 -0.28 106 LA Monroe -13.07 -60.77 -11.67 12 7.26 107 New Mexico -8.88 -128.27 -12.16 -2 -0.69 108 Akron -11.13 -137.32 -14.10 1 -0.28 109 Navy -12.92 -113.38 -14.13 -3 -2.35 110 Colorado St. -17.79 -57.40 -14.65 -2 -1.11 111 Cent. Michigan -15.59 -102.96 -15.40 -1 -1.23 112 Illinois -13.09 -143.88 -15.73 9 4.66 113 Massachusetts -16.17 -107.07 -15.99 4 2.66 114 Georgia State -16.99 -110.79 -16.71 1 1.30 115 West. Kentucky -18.87 -106.12 -17.74 -4 -2.61 116 UNLV -17.12 -132.81 -17.87 3 1.81 117 Louisville -19.47 -104.44 -18.06 -5 -1.34 118 UTEP -17.72 -133.04 -18.29 -4 -0.34 119 Old Dominion -19.25 -116.01 -18.48 -3 0.09 120 Oregon St. -18.88 -121.75 -18.51 -7 -0.86 121 Rutgers -19.45 -156.23 -20.56 3 1.97 122 Kent St. -21.64 -158.31 -22.13 3 1.05 123 South Alabama -22.01 -155.07 -22.22 -3 -1.96 124 Rice -23.24 -152.47 -22.91 -1 -0.95 125 San Jose St. -21.57 -180.96 -23.19 -3 -1.68 126 Texas St. -21.00 -196.60 -23.57 3 2.01 127 Bowling Green -25.81 -147.26 -24.37 0 0.08 128 New Mexico St. -23.84 -179.62 -24.63 0 0.21 129 UT-San Antonio -21.51 -213.96 -24.75 -3 -1.07 130 Connecticut -27.91 -267.25 -31.61 0 -0.24 By Conference AAC 17 UCF 17.31 62.29 14.57 22 Temple 12.62 104.31 13.49 29 Cincinnati 11.46 78.15 11.44 55 Houston 3.45 -3.84 2.11 65 Tulane 1.24 -14.95 0.10 71 Memphis -1.24 -8.62 -1.24 85 East Carolina -10.70 54.16 -4.50 87 SMU -3.43 -52.34 -4.83 97 South Florida -8.26 -38.23 -7.36 104 Tulsa -10.33 -78.58 -10.71 109 Navy -12.92 -113.38 -14.13 130 Connecticut -27.91 -267.25 -31.61 ACC 2 Clemson 37.07 283.53 38.51 16 N.C. State 13.95 108.70 14.59 35 Miami (FL) 7.27 83.00 8.88 41 Boston Coll. 7.10 35.97 6.48 43 Syracuse 7.47 19.11 5.91 46 Georgia Tech 3.33 52.68 4.79 54 Virginia 2.28 13.20 2.16 57 Duke 5.48 -40.15 1.70 67 Pittsburgh 1.88 -28.20 -0.12 82 Virginia Tech -3.70 -33.50 -4.09 94 Florida St. -7.88 -15.35 -6.00 99 Wake Forest -8.42 -63.68 -8.71 100 North Carolina -11.95 -18.50 -8.87 117 Louisville -19.47 -104.44 -18.06 B1G 3 Michigan 28.23 254.75 31.22 9 Ohio St. 15.25 137.37 16.85 10 Penn St. 18.25 83.45 16.23 13 Iowa 15.39 115.48 15.88 20 Purdue 13.93 94.85 13.90 24 Michigan St. 12.51 84.32 12.44 34 Wisconsin 7.91 84.57 9.39 49 Nebraska -0.60 83.67 3.67 52 Maryland 3.75 5.45 2.77 53 Northwestern 3.98 1.70 2.74 80 Minnesota -3.62 -20.25 -3.40 86 Indiana -7.10 2.27 -4.62 112 Illinois -13.09 -143.88 -15.73 121 Rutgers -19.45 -156.23 -20.56 BXII-II 4 Oklahoma 23.25 202.68 25.36 21 West Virginia 15.42 71.32 13.75 25 Iowa St. 12.15 87.95 12.38 30 Texas Tech 11.31 78.46 11.36 37 Texas 9.31 46.96 8.49 48 Oklahoma St. 3.20 36.59 3.92 50 TCU 1.28 46.37 3.11 84 Baylor -4.43 -28.96 -4.36 92 Kansas St. -2.83 -81.62 -5.85 103 Kansas -8.01 -106.65 -10.53 CUSA 11 North Texas 15.19 123.43 16.13 18 UAB 13.30 115.30 14.48 59 Florida Atlantic -1.03 37.10 1.12 66 Marshall 0.29 -6.08 -0.10 68 Southern Miss -5.63 72.80 -0.21 83 Louisiana Tech -3.81 -37.09 -4.35 88 Middle Tenn. St. -1.77 -77.99 -4.97 95 Florida Intl. -5.37 -66.28 -6.80 96 UNC-Charlotte -10.97 8.19 -6.91 115 West. Kentucky -18.87 -106.12 -17.74 118 UTEP -17.72 -133.04 -18.29 119 Old Dominion -19.25 -116.01 -18.48 124 Rice -23.24 -152.47 -22.91 129 UT-San Antonio -21.51 -213.96 -24.75 Indies 19 Notre Dame 13.96 102.47 14.29 23 Army 14.03 73.96 12.95 51 BYU 2.34 31.21 3.08 98 Liberty -5.96 -72.11 -7.48 113 Massachusetts -16.17 -107.07 -15.99 128 New Mexico St. -23.84 -179.62 -24.63 MAC 36 Ohio 9.08 56.22 8.79 39 Buffalo 7.27 57.36 7.64 63 East. Michigan 0.84 -1.00 0.51 70 Toledo 3.09 -52.35 -0.49 72 Miami (OH) -2.20 0.01 -1.47 89 Northern Illinois -3.49 -55.71 -5.04 93 W. Michigan -9.20 3.25 -5.98 102 Ball St. -10.80 -67.65 -10.49 108 Akron -11.13 -137.32 -14.10 111 Cent. Michigan -15.59 -102.96 -15.40 122 Kent St. -21.64 -158.31 -22.13 127 Bowling Green -25.81 -147.26 -24.37 MWC 12 Fresno St. 18.49 76.32 16.04 14 Utah St. 19.48 53.40 15.59 31 Boise St. 10.18 85.98 10.97 58 San Diego St. -0.14 27.43 1.24 61 Air Force 0.69 4.27 0.67 77 Wyoming -3.69 -6.33 -2.77 90 Nevada -4.51 -50.66 -5.47 105 Hawaii -10.56 -93.51 -11.59 107 New Mexico -8.88 -128.27 -12.16 110 Colorado St. -17.79 -57.40 -14.65 116 UNLV -17.12 -132.81 -17.87 125 San Jose St. -21.57 -180.96 -23.19 P12 26 Washington St. 9.71 114.11 12.03 28 Utah 11.58 79.32 11.58 33 Washington 9.81 68.30 9.86 40 Arizona St. 6.84 44.98 6.75 42 Stanford 8.17 11.67 6.02 56 Arizona -1.65 62.26 1.93 60 Oregon 0.98 1.20 0.71 64 USC 0.42 -3.22 0.13 69 Colorado -2.00 19.34 -0.39 76 UCLA -3.43 -3.64 -2.46 79 California -4.17 -4.00 -2.97 120 Oregon St. -18.88 -121.75 -18.51 SBC 27 Appalachian State 12.38 76.68 11.98 74 Georgia Southern 3.95 -92.86 -1.89 75 Troy -1.99 -13.35 -1.98 78 Arkansas St. -5.35 15.07 -2.83 81 LA Lafayette -4.33 -12.67 -3.50 101 Coastal Carolina -8.72 -68.64 -9.15 106 LA Monroe -13.07 -60.77 -11.67 114 Georgia State -16.99 -110.79 -16.71 123 South Alabama -22.01 -155.07 -22.22 126 Texas St. -21.00 -196.60 -23.57 SEC 1 Alabama 36.81 294.81 38.88 5 Georgia 23.75 123.80 21.86 6 LSU 19.98 80.74 17.24 7 Texas A&M 12.26 179.79 16.92 8 Missouri 16.72 118.62 16.92 15 Mississippi St. 14.43 113.36 15.13 32 Kentucky 11.14 60.48 10.37 38 Florida 9.23 32.21 7.72 44 Auburn 6.93 18.48 5.52 45 South Carolina 5.32 29.66 4.99 47 Mississippi 1.53 67.92 4.33 62 Vanderbilt 4.03 -43.54 0.57 73 Tennessee -1.33 -16.85 -1.71 91 Arkansas -8.29 0.96 -5.48
  23. 2 points
    So the critical threshold has been crossed ... every FBS team has played at least two other FBS teams, which allows DUSHEE to calculate a score for each team without dividing by zeros or linearly extrapolating single points and other mathematical impossibilities that it doesn't like to do. To no one's surprise, Alabama is #1 by a mile. But this year's inaugural poll comes with the same caveat that every inaugural DUSHEE poll comes with ... just because there is enough data to calculate scores doesn't mean there is enough data to calculate valid scores. And there is some craziness in this initial ranking that may exceed the craziness seen in any other initial DUSHEE ranking. Baylor, who always seems to be an early season DUSHEE favorite before falling precipitously later in the season, is a top 25 team. North Texas comes in ranked #15. Kentucky is your 6th best team in the country. And if the season ended today, App State is replaying Penn State in the first round of the College Football Playoff. But before we get to that, let's go through some of the changes that have occurred between this season and last in college football. Idaho has left us as an FBS school, but has been replaced by the Fightin' Jerry Falwells, aka the Liberty Flames, as an FBS independent. New Mexico State, like Idaho, has been dropped by the Sun Belt, but remains in FBS as an independent, swelling their ranks to 6. So let's take a look at a few of our initial WTF teams and see why they're where they are. Initial WTF Teams App State App State is ranked 3rd on the basis of two games, their 45-38 loss to Penn State in week 1 and a 45-9 whipping of UNC-Charlotte in week 2. Their week 3 tilt with Southern Miss was cancelled/postponed due to Florence and last week they destroyed FCS Gardner-Webb, which doesn't factor into DUSHEE. As we've discussed in the past, DUSHEE does reward moral victories, and at this point at least, that loss to Penn State looks like a BIG moral victory. App State's MOV (-7) and Yardage Margin (+17) against Penn State is currently being compared to Pitt's numbers against Penn State in Week 2 (-45 MOV and -90 YM), Kent State's in Week 3 (-53 MOV and -446 YM), and Illinois in Week 4 (-39 MOV and -180 YM). So if you crunch the numbers, App State did 38.7 points better than Penn State's average opponent and 238.7 yards better. And this elucidates the problem with too little data. As of this point, Penn State's average opponent is nowhere near an average FBS team; in fact Penn State's strength of schedule is 103rd out of 130 schools if you include 3rd ranked Appalachian State. If you don't include them, App State's performance is being compared against the 92nd (Pitt), 124th (Kent St.), and 106th (Illinois) ranked teams. Compared to those teams, App State looks like a world beater. Penn State's SOS starts to even up a bit when they face Ohio State this week. App State will drop as Penn State plays (presumably) tighter games against stiffer competition and App State plays closer games against their mediocre conference slate. That said, if App State waltzes through the Sun Belt, and there is little indication they won't, look for that close game against Penn State to keep the (other) Mountaineers in the top 25. North Texas North Texas comes in #15 on the basis of a +23 MOV, +273 YM performance against SMU, a +27 MOV, +40 YM performance against Arkansas, and a +40 MOV, +179 YM performance against Liberty. Not exactly a murderer's row of opponents, but UNT looks comparatively good next to TCU's performance against SMU (+30 MOV, +151 YM) and Auburn's performance against Arkansas (+31 MOV, -65 YM). But the game that really inflates UNT's DUSHEE score is Liberty's week 1 mauling of Old Dominion (+42 MOV, +290 YM), which after Old Dominion's week 4 upset of Virginia Tech (+14 MOV, +32 YM), gives North Texas a huge boost in DUSHEE. Baylor Baylor beat a bad UTSA pretty soundly (+17 MOV, +239 YM), lost to a decent (ranked 21) Duke team (-13 MOV, -3 YM), and beat what DUSHEE does not consider an awful (ranked 47th, at this point, noting that DUSHEE is ignoring their loss to Nichols St.) Kansas team (+19 MOV, +176 YM). I don't expect either Baylor or Kansas to stay this high once both start playing the meat of their Big XII-II schedule. Conference Rankings Right now, with most of the non-conference tilts decided and heading into conference play, the ACC and Pac-12 look incredibly mediocre, much closer to the American (slogan: No, there's a Power SIX! Really! It says so on our first down markers!) than they do the SEC, Big XII-II, and B1G. Speaking of which, if there is any consolation to what has been a bad two weeks for Frog fans, DUSHEE thinks the Big XII-II is the second strongest conference, on average. SEC 19.03 B12 15.48 B10 11.52 P12 2.14 ACC 1.78 AAC -3.91 MAC -11.67 MWC -12.07 CUSA -13.41 SBC -14.26 TCU The Frogs enter the rankings at #28, which seems about right, even if there are teams above and below them that are clearly misplaced at this point. Here are the Frogs DUSHEE numbers at this point, once again acknowledging that the week 1 game against Southern is ignored. PD is "point differential" which is MOV compared to the opponent's opponents average MOV; YD is "yardage differential," performing the same comparison for offensive total yardage; "score" is the DUSHEE score which adjusts the PD based on YD with a methodology described elsewhere in this blog. Opp: @ SMU N OhSt @ Tex PD: 14.33 34.00 -6.67 YD: 5.00 348.33 73.00 Score: 9.80 40.03 -0.81 DUSHEE is currently greatly rewarding the Frogs for their moral victory over the Buckeyes. Too bad we couldn't have made it an actual victory. Would have made that turd against Texas a little easier to swallow. Frogs Next Opponent: Iowa State DUSHEE currently has Iowa State ranked #45 with a DUSHEE score of 8.02. With TCU's DUSHEE score at 16.34 and giving the Frogs a home field advantage boost of 3.5 points (based on previous years' numbers; there have not been enough games played to establish a number for this season), DUSHEE has the Frogs as a 12-point favorite against the Cyclones with a ~70% chance of winning. But if the teams that showed up last week play each other, DUSHEE likes Iowa State to win by a TD or so. Opp: @ Iowa OU Akr PD: -2.50 18.00 18.00 YD: -18.00 62.67 -10.00 Score: -2.56 15.12 11.50 Rankings Rank Team PD YD Score 1 Alabama 50.25 267.50 46.84 2 Penn St. 41.88 156.38 35.71 3 Appalachian State 33.58 260.33 35.37 4 Georgia 31.83 263.17 34.34 5 Clemson 27.33 319.33 34.14 6 Kentucky 32.17 227.67 32.79 7 South Carolina 30.50 244.56 32.52 8 Ohio St. 31.38 230.75 32.42 9 Texas A&M 29.22 245.72 31.73 10 West Virginia 27.75 240.50 30.49 11 Michigan 26.17 217.63 28.29 12 Wisconsin 27.13 193.38 27.72 13 Oklahoma St. 26.50 146.28 24.96 14 Notre Dame 27.38 130.00 24.73 15 North Texas 20.67 174.06 22.45 16 LSU 25.50 108.50 22.41 17 Missouri 17.67 200.78 21.79 18 Texas Tech 18.83 174.33 21.25 19 Mississippi St. 18.17 179.17 21.04 20 Miami (FL) 21.11 135.22 20.82 21 Duke 24.17 82.11 20.20 22 Boise St. 16.33 161.17 18.92 23 Oklahoma 18.92 125.25 18.85 24 Baylor 17.28 140.17 18.51 25 Stanford 23.72 38.50 17.73 26 Washington 18.22 106.17 17.44 27 Temple 19.89 80.28 17.26 28 TCU 13.89 142.11 16.34 29 Washington St. 9.83 188.78 15.97 30 Michigan St. 17.06 92.11 15.96 31 Army 15.29 106.42 15.50 32 Maryland 15.17 92.46 14.72 33 East Carolina 10.75 147.25 14.51 34 Florida 19.56 22.50 14.16 35 Texas 13.54 98.71 13.95 36 Iowa 13.06 101.33 13.76 37 Purdue 5.50 173.25 12.30 38 N.C. State 15.00 45.75 12.28 39 USC 11.17 77.96 11.33 40 BYU 11.11 69.56 10.87 41 Buffalo 12.94 43.67 10.81 42 Minnesota 10.10 65.48 10.00 43 Auburn 15.00 -13.67 9.32 44 Houston 8.67 48.67 8.20 45 Iowa St. 11.17 11.56 8.02 46 Fresno St. 4.58 79.33 7.01 47 Kansas 6.61 34.22 6.11 48 Mississippi 3.89 56.56 5.41 49 Arizona St. 6.17 25.17 5.37 50 Tennessee 1.33 68.17 4.29 51 Marshall 7.17 -12.50 4.15 52 Ball St. 2.89 26.56 3.25 53 Memphis 1.56 42.17 3.14 54 California 2.25 29.50 2.97 55 East. Michigan 1.78 34.94 2.93 56 Utah St. 9.50 -78.17 2.44 57 Liberty -0.89 59.83 2.39 58 Syracuse 1.33 29.00 2.33 59 Arkansas St. -1.06 54.83 2.03 60 Indiana -1.00 53.58 2.00 61 Virginia 0.61 27.17 1.76 62 Nebraska -5.56 105.56 1.56 63 Boston Coll. -1.06 29.33 0.76 64 San Diego St. 3.06 -30.00 0.54 65 South Florida 4.50 -49.67 0.52 66 Vanderbilt 0.04 2.13 0.13 67 Northwestern -2.39 32.72 0.04 68 Colorado -0.92 6.33 -0.30 69 Ohio 3.50 -65.75 -0.94 70 Southern Miss -11.25 108.75 -2.08 71 Oregon 1.17 -57.67 -2.10 72 Kansas St. -1.94 -47.00 -3.64 73 Navy -3.89 -36.61 -4.42 74 W. Michigan -9.22 33.44 -4.48 75 Hawaii -1.63 -75.79 -4.86 76 Arizona -10.83 43.50 -5.05 77 Florida Atlantic -6.33 -26.00 -5.52 78 Utah -7.00 -22.83 -5.80 79 Florida St. -9.39 -0.39 -6.28 80 Florida Intl. -2.04 -105.21 -6.61 81 Louisiana Tech -9.92 -9.33 -7.08 82 Cincinnati -3.67 -98.61 -7.36 83 UCF -2.50 -126.75 -7.99 84 Georgia Tech -15.00 33.00 -8.35 85 Virginia Tech -6.58 -79.92 -8.37 86 Tulsa -11.17 -20.78 -8.48 87 West. Kentucky -11.33 -22.06 -8.66 88 North Carolina -16.67 44.50 -8.89 89 UCLA -11.17 -38.94 -9.39 90 Arkansas -19.28 49.22 -10.40 91 SMU -9.29 -93.75 -10.87 92 Pittsburgh -14.67 -39.67 -11.76 93 Wake Forest -13.11 -61.17 -11.79 94 Louisville -7.72 -135.94 -11.93 95 Troy -17.00 -24.83 -12.57 96 Cent. Michigan -12.78 -81.50 -12.58 97 Wyoming -15.25 -48.75 -12.60 98 LA Monroe -18.17 -12.67 -12.74 99 Georgia Southern -6.83 -174.42 -13.25 100 UNLV -13.78 -91.72 -13.76 101 Toledo -10.75 -141.25 -14.21 102 Rutgers -13.71 -111.75 -14.71 103 Akron -11.50 -155.50 -15.42 104 Rice -12.94 -144.83 -15.85 105 Coastal Carolina -16.17 -105.50 -16.04 106 Illinois -10.33 -231.83 -18.45 107 Miami (OH) -18.42 -127.17 -18.62 108 Air Force -15.25 -178.50 -19.07 109 Colorado St. -20.04 -123.21 -19.50 110 South Alabama -17.38 -164.25 -19.77 111 Tulane -20.44 -125.11 -19.87 112 Middle Tenn. St. -25.00 -75.92 -20.45 113 Old Dominion -18.00 -183.92 -21.17 114 Oregon St. -25.11 -116.00 -22.52 115 New Mexico -14.75 -258.46 -22.72 116 UAB -28.25 -122.50 -24.94 117 Northern Illinois -25.75 -204.75 -27.37 118 Bowling Green -29.89 -153.89 -27.60 119 LA Lafayette -26.75 -226.50 -29.12 120 UNC-Charlotte -33.89 -153.44 -30.24 121 Georgia State -31.50 -192.33 -30.59 122 Connecticut -26.50 -279.83 -31.62 123 UT-San Antonio -30.92 -238.63 -32.51 124 Kent St. -30.22 -314.22 -35.81 125 Nevada -35.50 -267.61 -37.01 126 UTEP -38.83 -267.42 -39.22 127 Massachusetts -33.71 -339.71 -39.41 128 San Jose St. -37.75 -381.75 -44.20 129 New Mexico St. -42.13 -353.07 -45.69 130 Texas St. -43.56 -338.00 -45.89 Rankings by Conference AAC 27 Temple 19.89 80.28 17.26 33 East Carolina 10.75 147.25 14.51 44 Houston 8.67 48.67 8.20 53 Memphis 1.56 42.17 3.14 65 South Florida 4.50 -49.67 0.52 73 Navy -3.89 -36.61 -4.42 82 Cincinnati -3.67 -98.61 -7.36 83 UCF -2.50 -126.75 -7.99 86 Tulsa -11.17 -20.78 -8.48 91 SMU -9.29 -93.75 -10.87 111 Tulane -20.44 -125.11 -19.87 122 Connecticut -26.50 -279.83 -31.62 ACC 5 Clemson 27.33 319.33 34.14 20 Miami (FL) 21.11 135.22 20.82 21 Duke 24.17 82.11 20.20 38 N.C. State 15.00 45.75 12.28 58 Syracuse 1.33 29.00 2.33 61 Virginia 0.61 27.17 1.76 63 Boston Coll. -1.06 29.33 0.76 79 Florida St. -9.39 -0.39 -6.28 84 Georgia Tech -15.00 33.00 -8.35 85 Virginia Tech -6.58 -79.92 -8.37 88 North Carolina -16.67 44.50 -8.89 92 Pittsburgh -14.67 -39.67 -11.76 93 Wake Forest -13.11 -61.17 -11.79 94 Louisville -7.72 -135.94 -11.93 B1G 2 Penn St. 41.88 156.38 35.71 8 Ohio St. 31.38 230.75 32.42 11 Michigan 26.17 217.63 28.29 12 Wisconsin 27.13 193.38 27.72 30 Michigan St. 17.06 92.11 15.96 32 Maryland 15.17 92.46 14.72 36 Iowa 13.06 101.33 13.76 37 Purdue 5.50 173.25 12.30 42 Minnesota 10.10 65.48 10.00 60 Indiana -1.00 53.58 2.00 62 Nebraska -5.56 105.56 1.56 67 Northwestern -2.39 32.72 0.04 102 Rutgers -13.71 -111.75 -14.71 106 Illinois -10.33 -231.83 -18.45 XII-II 10 West Virginia 27.75 240.50 30.49 13 Oklahoma St. 26.50 146.28 24.96 18 Texas Tech 18.83 174.33 21.25 23 Oklahoma 18.92 125.25 18.85 24 Baylor 17.28 140.17 18.51 28 TCU 13.89 142.11 16.34 35 Texas 13.54 98.71 13.95 45 Iowa St. 11.17 11.56 8.02 47 Kansas 6.61 34.22 6.11 72 Kansas St. -1.94 -47.00 -3.64 CUSA 15 North Texas 20.67 174.06 22.45 51 Marshall 7.17 -12.50 4.15 70 Southern Miss -11.25 108.75 -2.08 77 Florida Atlantic -6.33 -26.00 -5.52 80 Florida Intl. -2.04 -105.21 -6.61 81 Louisiana Tech -9.92 -9.33 -7.08 87 West. Kentucky -11.33 -22.06 -8.66 104 Rice -12.94 -144.83 -15.85 112 Middle Tenn. St. -25.00 -75.92 -20.45 113 Old Dominion -18.00 -183.92 -21.17 116 UAB -28.25 -122.50 -24.94 120 UNC-Charlotte -33.89 -153.44 -30.24 123 UT-San Antonio -30.92 -238.63 -32.51 126 UTEP -38.83 -267.42 -39.22 Indies 14 Notre Dame 27.38 130.00 24.73 31 Army 15.29 106.42 15.50 40 BYU 11.11 69.56 10.87 57 Liberty -0.89 59.83 2.39 127 Massachusetts -33.71 -339.71 -39.41 129 New Mexico St. -42.13 -353.07 -45.69 MAC 41 Buffalo 12.94 43.67 10.81 52 Ball St. 2.89 26.56 3.25 55 East. Michigan 1.78 34.94 2.93 69 Ohio 3.50 -65.75 -0.94 74 W. Michigan -9.22 33.44 -4.48 96 Cent. Michigan -12.78 -81.50 -12.58 101 Toledo -10.75 -141.25 -14.21 103 Akron -11.50 -155.50 -15.42 107 Miami (OH) -18.42 -127.17 -18.62 117 Northern Illinois -25.75 -204.75 -27.37 118 Bowling Green -29.89 -153.89 -27.60 124 Kent St. -30.22 -314.22 -35.81 MWC 22 Boise St. 16.33 161.17 18.92 46 Fresno St. 4.58 79.33 7.01 56 Utah St. 9.50 -78.17 2.44 64 San Diego St. 3.06 -30.00 0.54 75 Hawaii -1.63 -75.79 -4.86 97 Wyoming -15.25 -48.75 -12.60 100 UNLV -13.78 -91.72 -13.76 108 Air Force -15.25 -178.50 -19.07 109 Colorado St. -20.04 -123.21 -19.50 115 New Mexico -14.75 -258.46 -22.72 125 Nevada -35.50 -267.61 -37.01 128 San Jose St. -37.75 -381.75 -44.20 PAC12 25 Stanford 23.72 38.50 17.73 26 Washington 18.22 106.17 17.44 29 Washington St. 9.83 188.78 15.97 39 USC 11.17 77.96 11.33 49 Arizona St. 6.17 25.17 5.37 54 California 2.25 29.50 2.97 68 Colorado -0.92 6.33 -0.30 71 Oregon 1.17 -57.67 -2.10 76 Arizona -10.83 43.50 -5.05 78 Utah -7.00 -22.83 -5.80 89 UCLA -11.17 -38.94 -9.39 114 Oregon St. -25.11 -116.00 -22.52 SBC 3 Appalachian State 33.58 260.33 35.37 59 Arkansas St. -1.06 54.83 2.03 95 Troy -17.00 -24.83 -12.57 98 LA Monroe -18.17 -12.67 -12.74 99 Georgia Southern -6.83 -174.42 -13.25 105 Coastal Carolina -16.17 -105.50 -16.04 110 South Alabama -17.38 -164.25 -19.77 119 LA Lafayette -26.75 -226.50 -29.12 121 Georgia State -31.50 -192.33 -30.59 130 Texas St. -43.56 -338.00 -45.89 SEC 1 Alabama 50.25 267.50 46.84 4 Georgia 31.83 263.17 34.34 6 Kentucky 32.17 227.67 32.79 7 South Carolina 30.50 244.56 32.52 9 Texas A&M 29.22 245.72 31.73 16 LSU 25.50 108.50 22.41 17 Missouri 17.67 200.78 21.79 19 Mississippi St. 18.17 179.17 21.04 34 Florida 19.56 22.50 14.16 43 Auburn 15.00 -13.67 9.32 48 Mississippi 3.89 56.56 5.41 50 Tennessee 1.33 68.17 4.29 66 Vanderbilt 0.04 2.13 0.13 90 Arkansas -19.28 49.22 -10.40
  24. 2 points
    DUSHEE still loves the Ojai-uh Bucks and has now moved three SEC teams into slots 2-4. A playoff final 4 that would be enough to make college football fans in every other part of the country outside the southeast and Ohio vomit. The Frogs slid yet another spot to 14th. The Frogs slow trickle down through the standings seems to be due to a general drop in the performance of the Big XII-II as a whole as the conference dropped from the 2nd spot to the 4th spot, passed by both the ACC and SEC this week. DUSHEE has rewarded those conferences for blowing out their patsies this week (although again, remember that Mercer and the Citadel are ignored in the ranking). It was a big week for the non-Power 5 schools (what is the euphemism ESPN has come up with for them?) as Boise (19), Memphis (21), and Florida Atlantic (22) all found their way into the top 25. All three of those schools are out of the top 25 in the DUSHEE Extra Crispy rankings (29, 30, and 38, respectively) which punish poor schedule strength more (86th, 78th, and 85th, respectively). The Frogs, BTW, are 12th in the Extra Crispy poll (28th SOS). Frogs Week-to-Week It was a middlin' performance for the Frogs; the point differential among the Frogs' better numbers of the year, but for the second time this season, TCU went negative in yardage differential (WVU the other instance). In general, the Frogs have not done well in yardage differential; on average, teams have a yardage differential to point differential ratio of 6.7 yards for every point. The Frogs have only exceeded that average three times: Kansas, Iowa State, and Oklahoma. The Frogs average YD:PD ratio is 4.4. What this means varies depending on interpretation -- either the Frogs have been very efficient or the Frogs have been a little lucky. The scores should have been closer in a lot of the Frogs' games than they were based on how well the offense moved the ball relative to how well the defense kept the opposing offense from moving the ball. @ Ark SMU @ OkSt WVU @ KSU Kan @ ISU Tex @ OU @ Ttech 9.11 23.22 29.60 12.33 26.44 16.89 2.22 28.10 0.90 24.56 18.67 155.22 136.10 -66.89 115.89 373.89 71.11 142.00 98.80 -27.22 7.00 23.16 26.47 4.91 23.36 29.76 5.00 25.76 5.49 15.02 Frogs Next Opponent Week-to-Week: Rapey Bears Despite their record, Baylor has only been truly awful three times this season: Duke, Oklahoma State, and Texas. But they've only played like an above average team once, against Oklahoma. In fact they played Oklahoma better than the Frogs did. In the Bears other six games, they have been squarely average. The worst TCU performance this year would have beaten any individual Baylor performance other than Oklahoma. Using DUSHEE, and running 10,000+ Monte Carlo simulations, TCU beats Baylor 94% of the time and has the Frogs as a 27 point favorite. This game should be no problem. Hopefully I do not regret those words on Friday. UTSA @ Duke OU @ KSU @ OkSt WVU Tex @ Kan # Ttech ISU -1.38 -15.67 11.90 -10.22 -32.00 2.33 -24.70 1.33 -17.67 -1.11 -13.50 -132.89 102.10 -48.56 -223.60 50.89 -141.80 21.67 215.00 -56.67 -1.58 -17.02 12.99 -9.22 -32.40 4.07 -23.48 1.96 -1.14 -3.55 Conference Rankings B10 6.57 SEC 6.28 ACC 5.78 B12 5.52 P12 3.81 AAC -0.58 MWC -5.94 MAC -7.84 CUSA -8.25 SBC -8.74 Top 3 Performances 49.71 - Louisville vs. Syracuse (46 Point Margin, 392 Yardage Margin) 44.93 - Georgia Southern vs. South Alabama (52 PM, 388 YM) 39.22 - Northwestern vs. Minnesota (39 PM, 181 YM) Bottom 3 Performances -77.15 - South Alabama at Georgia Southern (-52 PM, -388 YM) -52.10 - Cincinnati at East Carolina (-28 PM, -252 YM) -46.13 - Rutgers at Indiana (-41 PM, -313 YM) Overall Rankings Rank Team PD YD Score Rk +/- Score +/- 1 Ohio St. 27.50 272.25 31.81 0 0.33 2 Alabama 29.33 233.84 31.13 0 0.07 3 Auburn 27.24 210.87 28.60 0 1.13 4 Georgia 25.47 165.84 25.19 2 0.88 5 Oklahoma 21.15 217.93 24.88 -1 -0.84 6 Penn St. 26.15 138.81 24.31 -1 -1.07 7 Wisconsin 23.73 169.84 24.23 2 1.39 8 Clemson 21.26 188.43 23.50 -1 -0.46 9 Notre Dame 21.55 127.79 20.69 1 -1.33 10 UCF 21.98 121.05 20.65 1 -1.25 11 Oklahoma St. 17.54 172.23 20.22 -3 -2.75 12 Mississippi St. 16.16 129.77 17.20 0 -1.83 13 Washington 17.60 101.28 16.75 1 -0.67 14 TCU 17.34 101.76 16.59 -1 -0.94 15 Virginia Tech 15.84 99.77 15.49 0 -1.44 16 Miami (FL) 17.98 50.12 14.47 0 -2.28 17 Washington St. 9.67 137.48 13.25 2 -0.28 18 USC 12.33 94.10 12.88 -1 -2.11 19 Boise St. 12.51 73.54 11.98 7 1.49 20 Michigan 9.72 109.40 11.89 0 -0.29 21 Memphis 13.07 50.14 11.20 7 1.22 22 Florida Atlantic 13.94 37.12 11.13 10 2.12 23 South Florida 7.91 92.06 9.83 -2 -1.83 24 Louisville 5.22 127.23 9.77 18 4.70 25 Stanford 12.22 32.10 9.73 2 -0.55 26 LSU 7.57 94.71 9.73 -3 -1.23 27 Iowa 14.03 4.20 9.56 -5 -1.80 28 N.C. State 7.29 90.66 9.35 1 -0.34 29 Iowa St. 11.74 29.74 9.30 -5 -1.62 30 Michigan St. 6.65 96.21 9.20 -5 -1.62 31 Georgia Tech 5.03 112.86 8.94 -13 -4.63 32 San Diego St. 7.72 66.81 8.45 -1 -0.59 33 Wake Forest 9.82 38.32 8.45 -3 -1.01 34 Toledo 8.29 52.77 8.14 2 0.92 35 Northwestern 9.67 28.70 7.87 9 2.93 36 Texas 8.08 48.23 7.77 2 1.30 37 Purdue 8.35 38.35 7.47 -4 -0.48 38 Texas A&M 6.59 53.11 7.02 -1 0.51 39 Navy 5.64 51.25 6.30 0 0.03 40 West Virginia 5.28 49.15 5.95 -6 -1.64 41 Northern Illinois 5.13 27.98 4.80 4 0.82 42 Oregon 2.58 61.80 4.78 12 3.16 43 Boston Coll. 6.32 7.92 4.61 -3 -0.89 44 Missouri 5.58 15.44 4.48 2 0.61 45 Utah 3.33 42.75 4.33 5 1.31 46 Indiana 1.75 53.65 3.82 14 3.10 47 Arizona 4.29 15.81 3.64 -12 -3.62 48 Fresno St. 3.17 26.18 3.41 0 -0.08 49 Arkansas St. 3.68 15.15 3.20 7 1.92 50 Ohio 4.85 -6.17 2.93 -9 -2.27 51 SMU 4.60 -3.42 2.89 -8 -2.14 52 Troy 2.90 18.73 2.86 1 1.06 53 Texas Tech 1.13 32.19 2.35 -4 -0.74 54 Marshall 2.05 9.21 1.82 -2 -0.39 55 Florida St. 1.04 20.12 1.69 0 0.24 56 Army 1.31 13.29 1.53 5 0.81 57 UT-San Antonio -1.76 51.75 1.39 6 1.64 58 Arizona St. 1.50 4.64 1.23 -7 -1.10 59 Duke 0.52 9.23 0.80 13 3.62 60 Colorado St. -0.60 17.68 0.48 2 -0.08 61 UCLA 0.69 0.22 0.47 3 0.77 62 East. Michigan 0.39 3.79 0.45 -3 -0.52 63 South Carolina 3.07 -38.64 0.13 2 0.65 64 Houston 1.20 -14.29 0.09 -7 -1.15 65 Southern Miss -3.89 45.74 -0.33 10 2.78 66 Nebraska -1.17 5.43 -0.51 0 0.58 67 North Texas -1.63 0.57 -1.06 2 1.07 68 Syracuse -3.45 25.04 -1.06 -21 -4.73 69 Appalachian State -1.20 -8.11 -1.20 -2 0.64 70 W. Michigan 0.57 -35.65 -1.38 6 1.90 71 Temple -3.68 17.65 -1.58 -1 1.02 72 California -0.50 -28.64 -1.75 -4 0.36 73 Kansas St. 2.44 -75.71 -2.12 4 1.43 74 Minnesota -0.93 -32.16 -2.21 -16 -3.31 75 Virginia -4.21 10.11 -2.31 7 2.16 76 Florida -2.16 -24.23 -2.64 17 3.74 77 Mississippi -4.20 -4.58 -3.03 -4 -0.15 78 Colorado -1.71 -43.34 -3.28 -4 -0.25 79 Pittsburgh -3.88 -18.54 -3.51 2 0.74 80 Buffalo -3.59 -31.26 -3.94 -1 0.09 81 Wyoming 0.64 -94.57 -4.25 6 1.09 82 Kentucky -0.76 -76.11 -4.27 2 0.40 83 Miami (OH) -6.57 -3.30 -4.54 2 0.26 84 Air Force -6.09 -10.41 -4.57 -6 -0.87 85 Utah St. -1.48 -77.21 -4.81 14 3.77 86 Louisiana Tech -4.92 -31.59 -4.84 -3 -0.18 87 Cent. Michigan -4.14 -42.49 -4.86 -16 -2.06 88 Tulane -2.94 -59.30 -4.90 3 1.22 89 Arkansas -6.29 -21.20 -5.24 0 0.67 90 Massachusetts -8.58 -3.70 -5.91 -2 -0.22 91 Maryland -5.96 -52.35 -6.56 1 -0.30 92 LA Monroe -6.04 -56.77 -6.84 5 0.61 93 Baylor -8.72 -22.74 -6.94 2 0.19 94 New Mexico St. -10.31 -15.79 -7.65 2 -0.49 95 UAB -7.08 -59.36 -7.66 -9 -2.62 96 Middle Tenn. St. -9.02 -35.96 -7.79 -6 -1.83 97 Georgia State -9.06 -38.09 -7.93 1 -0.20 98 UNLV -7.95 -60.23 -8.28 2 0.68 99 Tulsa -5.66 -100.29 -8.74 9 3.11 100 Florida Intl. -8.35 -67.96 -8.93 -6 -2.43 101 Tennessee -7.23 -83.28 -8.94 2 0.75 102 North Carolina -8.17 -78.33 -9.32 -1 0.29 103 West. Kentucky -10.46 -53.91 -9.64 4 2.02 104 Nevada -8.07 -89.22 -9.79 1 1.21 105 Cincinnati -11.87 -45.99 -10.19 -25 -6.07 106 Akron -6.18 -146.86 -11.39 8 3.19 107 BYU -10.80 -84.97 -11.41 6 2.89 108 Vanderbilt -10.11 -95.36 -11.46 -2 -0.23 109 New Mexico -13.61 -56.55 -11.87 1 0.93 110 Georgia Southern -12.62 -84.90 -12.61 13 8.07 111 Idaho -12.81 -84.19 -12.71 -2 -0.45 112 Coastal Carolina -13.11 -85.40 -12.97 0 0.24 113 Illinois -12.83 -113.10 -14.15 -2 -1.02 114 Rutgers -12.08 -136.50 -14.81 -10 -4.11 115 East Carolina -16.24 -94.67 -15.51 6 3.37 116 South Alabama -14.82 -122.37 -15.94 -14 -6.25 117 Old Dominion -15.65 -115.42 -16.15 0 -0.64 118 LA Lafayette -15.41 -119.77 -16.20 4 3.40 119 Oregon St. -17.27 -97.24 -16.33 -3 -0.89 120 Texas St. -17.71 -103.73 -16.94 -2 0.19 121 Hawaii -19.02 -86.17 -16.94 -6 -1.87 122 Connecticut -15.95 -129.13 -17.02 -3 0.39 123 Bowling Green -15.78 -151.23 -18.00 -3 0.41 124 Rice -23.87 -124.49 -22.07 1 0.70 125 Kansas -24.40 -131.62 -22.78 1 0.13 126 UNC-Charlotte -22.64 -169.54 -23.48 -2 -2.79 127 Kent St. -24.61 -149.76 -23.82 0 1.84 128 Ball St. -28.51 -150.13 -26.43 0 0.49 129 UTEP -26.70 -204.12 -27.90 0 0.78 130 San Jose St. -34.44 -244.13 -35.04 0 1.08 By Conference AAC 10 UCF 21.98 121.05 20.65 21 Memphis 13.07 50.14 11.20 23 South Florida 7.91 92.06 9.83 39 Navy 5.64 51.25 6.30 51 SMU 4.60 -3.42 2.89 64 Houston 1.20 -14.29 0.09 71 Temple -3.68 17.65 -1.58 88 Tulane -2.94 -59.30 -4.90 99 Tulsa -5.66 -100.29 -8.74 105 Cincinnati -11.87 -45.99 -10.19 115 East Carolina -16.24 -94.67 -15.51 122 Connecticut -15.95 -129.13 -17.02 ACC 8 Clemson 21.26 188.43 23.50 15 Virginia Tech 15.84 99.77 15.49 16 Miami (FL) 17.98 50.12 14.47 24 Louisville 5.22 127.23 9.77 28 N.C. State 7.29 90.66 9.35 31 Georgia Tech 5.03 112.86 8.94 33 Wake Forest 9.82 38.32 8.45 43 Boston Coll. 6.32 7.92 4.61 55 Florida St. 1.04 20.12 1.69 59 Duke 0.52 9.23 0.80 68 Syracuse -3.45 25.04 -1.06 75 Virginia -4.21 10.11 -2.31 79 Pittsburgh -3.88 -18.54 -3.51 102 North Carolina -8.17 -78.33 -9.32 B1G 1 Ohio St. 27.50 272.25 31.81 6 Penn St. 26.15 138.81 24.31 7 Wisconsin 23.73 169.84 24.23 20 Michigan 9.72 109.40 11.89 27 Iowa 14.03 4.20 9.56 30 Michigan St. 6.65 96.21 9.20 35 Northwestern 9.67 28.70 7.87 37 Purdue 8.35 38.35 7.47 46 Indiana 1.75 53.65 3.82 66 Nebraska -1.17 5.43 -0.51 74 Minnesota -0.93 -32.16 -2.21 91 Maryland -5.96 -52.35 -6.56 113 Illinois -12.83 -113.10 -14.15 114 Rutgers -12.08 -136.50 -14.81 BXII-II 5 Oklahoma 21.15 217.93 24.88 11 Oklahoma St. 17.54 172.23 20.22 14 TCU 17.34 101.76 16.59 29 Iowa St. 11.74 29.74 9.30 36 Texas 8.08 48.23 7.77 40 West Virginia 5.28 49.15 5.95 53 Texas Tech 1.13 32.19 2.35 73 Kansas St. 2.44 -75.71 -2.12 93 Baylor -8.72 -22.74 -6.94 125 Kansas -24.40 -131.62 -22.78 CUSA 22 Florida Atlantic 13.94 37.12 11.13 54 Marshall 2.05 9.21 1.82 57 UT-San Antonio -1.76 51.75 1.39 65 Southern Miss -3.89 45.74 -0.33 67 North Texas -1.63 0.57 -1.06 86 Louisiana Tech -4.92 -31.59 -4.84 95 UAB -7.08 -59.36 -7.66 96 Middle Tenn. St. -9.02 -35.96 -7.79 100 Florida Intl. -8.35 -67.96 -8.93 103 West. Kentucky -10.46 -53.91 -9.64 117 Old Dominion -15.65 -115.42 -16.15 124 Rice -23.87 -124.49 -22.07 126 UNC-Charlotte -22.64 -169.54 -23.48 129 UTEP -26.70 -204.12 -27.90 Indies 9 Notre Dame 21.55 127.79 20.69 56 Army 1.31 13.29 1.53 90 Massachusetts -8.58 -3.70 -5.91 107 BYU -10.80 -84.97 -11.41 MAC 34 Toledo 8.29 52.77 8.14 41 Northern Illinois 5.13 27.98 4.80 50 Ohio 4.85 -6.17 2.93 62 East. Michigan 0.39 3.79 0.45 70 W. Michigan 0.57 -35.65 -1.38 80 Buffalo -3.59 -31.26 -3.94 83 Miami (OH) -6.57 -3.30 -4.54 87 Cent. Michigan -4.14 -42.49 -4.86 106 Akron -6.18 -146.86 -11.39 123 Bowling Green -15.78 -151.23 -18.00 127 Kent St. -24.61 -149.76 -23.82 128 Ball St. -28.51 -150.13 -26.43 MWC 19 Boise St. 12.51 73.54 11.98 32 San Diego St. 7.72 66.81 8.45 48 Fresno St. 3.17 26.18 3.41 60 Colorado St. -0.60 17.68 0.48 81 Wyoming 0.64 -94.57 -4.25 84 Air Force -6.09 -10.41 -4.57 85 Utah St. -1.48 -77.21 -4.81 98 UNLV -7.95 -60.23 -8.28 104 Nevada -8.07 -89.22 -9.79 109 New Mexico -13.61 -56.55 -11.87 121 Hawaii -19.02 -86.17 -16.94 130 San Jose St. -34.44 -244.13 -35.04 P12 13 Washington 17.60 101.28 16.75 17 Washington St. 9.67 137.48 13.25 18 USC 12.33 94.10 12.88 25 Stanford 12.22 32.10 9.73 42 Oregon 2.58 61.80 4.78 45 Utah 3.33 42.75 4.33 47 Arizona 4.29 15.81 3.64 58 Arizona St. 1.50 4.64 1.23 61 UCLA 0.69 0.22 0.47 72 California -0.50 -28.64 -1.75 78 Colorado -1.71 -43.34 -3.28 119 Oregon St. -17.27 -97.24 -16.33 SBC 49 Arkansas St. 3.68 15.15 3.20 52 Troy 2.90 18.73 2.86 69 Appalachian State -1.20 -8.11 -1.20 92 LA Monroe -6.04 -56.77 -6.84 94 New Mexico St. -10.31 -15.79 -7.65 97 Georgia State -9.06 -38.09 -7.93 110 Georgia Southern -12.62 -84.90 -12.61 111 Idaho -12.81 -84.19 -12.71 112 Coastal Carolina -13.11 -85.40 -12.97 116 South Alabama -14.82 -122.37 -15.94 118 LA Lafayette -15.41 -119.77 -16.20 120 Texas St. -17.71 -103.73 -16.94 SEC 2 Alabama 29.33 233.84 31.13 3 Auburn 27.24 210.87 28.60 4 Georgia 25.47 165.84 25.19 12 Mississippi St. 16.16 129.77 17.20 26 LSU 7.57 94.71 9.73 38 Texas A&M 6.59 53.11 7.02 44 Missouri 5.58 15.44 4.48 63 South Carolina 3.07 -38.64 0.13 76 Florida -2.16 -24.23 -2.64 77 Mississippi -4.20 -4.58 -3.03 82 Kentucky -0.76 -76.11 -4.27 89 Arkansas -6.29 -21.20 -5.24 101 Tennessee -7.23 -83.28 -8.94 108 Vanderbilt -10.11 -95.36 -11.46
  25. 2 points
    DUSHEE just can't quit the Buckeyes. Ohio State's blow out win over Michigan State vaulted them back into the top spot, 0.4 of a point ahead of Alabama. Auburn leapt 7 spots to take 3rd and Oklahoma moved up 3 to take 4th. This is a lot of movement at this time of year, an indication of the magnitude of the blowouts we saw this weekend. WTF DUSHEE? Speaking of movement, while they have moved up 10 spots in the last two weeks, DUSHEE still has undefeated Miami well down the rankings in 16th. A look at Miami's week-to-week scores shows that while DUSHEE has been really impressed by the Canes the last two weeks, the first half of the season was a bit underwhelming. Tol @ Duke @ FSU GaTech Syr @ UNC VaTech ND 33.38 25.13 -3.25 7.43 5.75 -6.22 37.75 55.89 269.00 56.63 -123.13 -92.86 126.75 -122.22 265.13 232.56 35.45 19.53 -8.21 0.40 10.05 -10.15 38.18 48.67 The four game stretch from Florida State to North Carolina, Miami was very mediocre, despite going 4-0. They beat a bad Seminoles team by 4, getting outgained by 69, then beat a decent Georgia Tech team by 1 while getting outgained by 216, beat an average Syracuse team by 8, then beat a pretty bad North Carolina team by 5 while also getting outgained. It is this 4-game stretch that has Miami so far back in the rankings, despite how dominant they've looked the last two weeks. TCU Week-to-Week The Frogs only fell one spot to 13th. @ Ark SMU @ OkSt WVU @ KSU Kan @ ISU Tex @ OU 8.50 26.25 32.00 14.75 26.63 18.38 2.13 27.78 -1.22 25.13 178.50 145.00 -46.88 119.13 399.50 65.63 135.00 87.00 6.90 26.26 28.45 7.53 23.60 31.86 4.64 25.14 3.45 As we discussed last week, there seem to be two very discrete TCU teams this year, a slightly above average one and a really very good one. We got the slightly above average team Saturday night. Which, as we all know, made for a rough night. And we've been the slightly above average team two of the last 3 weeks. TCU's Next Opponent Week-to-Week: Technological Fortunately, slightly above average is probably enough to beat our next opponent, Texas Tech. Tech has been squarely average since Week 7. The Matadors are coming off of a streak of mediocre performances, beating an awful Baylor team by two scores, but getting outgained by almost 200 yards in the process. ASU @ Hou OkSt @ Kan @ WVU ISU @ OU KSU # Bay 5.56 10.29 9.78 21.75 -5.50 -10.25 -5.67 -3.75 2.88 105.78 129.14 -55.00 120.50 199.50 -64.88 8.11 51.63 -269.63 8.90 13.20 3.82 20.41 6.12 -10.02 -3.38 0.03 -11.32 Week 11 Top Performances 53.68 Ohio State vs. Michigan State (+45 Point Margin, +329 Yardage Margin) 53.57 Auburn vs. Georgia (+23 PM, +258 YM) 48.67 Miami vs. Notre Dame (+33 PM, +113 YM) Week 11 Bottom Performances -52.00 San Jose State at Nevada (-45 PM, -139 YM) -49.07 New Mexico at Texas A&M (-41 PM, -418 YM) -40.87 Tennessee at Missouri (-33 PM, -374 YM) Conference Rankings B10 6.97 B12 6.07 ACC 6.06 SEC 5.85 P12 4.13 AAC -0.41 MWC -6.50 MAC -8.21 CUSA -8.27 SBC -9.47 Overall Rankings Rank Team PD YD Score Rk +/- Score +/- 1 Ohio St. 27.76 264.33 31.48 1 1.44 2 Alabama 29.43 233.05 31.06 -1 -0.74 3 Auburn 25.86 208.37 27.46 7 4.65 4 Oklahoma 22.35 220.59 25.73 3 0.74 5 Penn St. 28.06 135.85 25.37 -1 -2.40 6 Georgia 24.77 158.77 24.31 -3 -4.70 7 Clemson 21.66 193.84 23.96 -1 -1.59 8 Oklahoma St. 20.25 193.03 22.97 1 -1.24 9 Wisconsin 22.49 159.92 22.84 2 1.68 10 Notre Dame 22.80 139.00 22.02 -5 -5.48 11 UCF 22.48 140.74 21.90 -3 -2.69 12 Mississippi St. 18.33 138.69 19.03 3 0.93 13 TCU 17.24 123.11 17.54 -1 -2.56 14 Washington 18.98 97.16 17.42 -1 -2.56 15 Virginia Tech 16.83 116.40 16.93 -1 -1.38 16 Miami (FL) 19.48 76.48 16.74 2 2.62 17 USC 13.82 117.56 14.98 -1 -1.16 18 Georgia Tech 9.36 149.25 13.57 6 2.31 19 Washington St. 9.96 140.35 13.53 1 0.17 20 Michigan 10.05 111.68 12.18 -1 -1.84 21 South Florida 9.22 112.21 11.65 5 0.60 22 Iowa 16.47 7.85 11.36 -1 -1.94 23 LSU 7.36 123.46 10.96 2 -0.27 24 Iowa St. 13.88 33.97 10.92 -1 -0.56 25 Michigan St. 8.23 108.56 10.81 -8 -3.76 26 Boise St. 11.21 61.49 10.49 1 0.47 27 Stanford 12.95 33.63 10.29 7 2.32 28 Memphis 12.47 33.93 9.98 1 0.24 29 N.C. State 8.27 85.01 9.68 -7 -1.92 30 Wake Forest 9.73 60.59 9.46 2 1.28 31 San Diego St. 7.45 83.06 9.04 0 0.39 32 Florida Atlantic 12.54 13.37 9.01 5 1.32 33 Purdue 8.19 50.63 7.94 2 0.06 34 West Virginia 6.61 64.96 7.59 -1 -0.40 35 Arizona 7.60 44.72 7.26 1 -0.59 36 Toledo 7.32 47.55 7.22 -6 -2.34 37 Texas A&M 6.00 51.33 6.52 11 3.41 38 Texas 6.84 39.10 6.48 -10 -3.46 39 Navy 5.74 49.81 6.27 5 1.27 40 Boston Coll. 6.27 26.88 5.50 -1 -0.94 41 Ohio 6.53 17.28 5.20 19 5.11 42 Louisville 0.88 91.50 5.08 7 2.27 43 SMU 6.57 13.47 5.04 -5 -1.62 44 Northwestern 6.44 13.15 4.94 -2 -0.21 45 Northern Illinois 3.77 29.90 3.98 2 0.81 46 Missouri 4.35 19.90 3.88 10 2.60 47 Syracuse 0.65 66.01 3.67 -7 -1.89 48 Fresno St. 2.55 36.43 3.49 -2 -0.41 49 Texas Tech 2.79 25.02 3.09 -8 -2.17 50 Utah 1.56 40.48 3.03 1 1.29 51 Arizona St. 2.69 10.98 2.33 -6 -2.00 52 Marshall 2.21 14.95 2.21 5 1.16 53 Troy 1.78 12.58 1.81 8 1.99 54 Oregon -0.03 33.35 1.62 -4 -0.84 55 Florida St. 0.55 22.18 1.46 -1 -0.05 56 Arkansas St. 3.11 -16.15 1.28 -13 -3.79 57 Houston 2.78 -12.51 1.24 1 0.57 58 Minnesota 2.74 -14.91 1.10 5 1.77 59 East. Michigan 1.36 1.26 0.97 -7 -0.64 60 Indiana -1.60 36.46 0.73 -5 -0.72 61 Army 1.44 -4.96 0.72 1 1.07 62 Colorado St. -0.17 13.54 0.55 -3 -0.01 63 UT-San Antonio -3.49 42.22 -0.26 4 1.41 64 UCLA 0.73 -16.17 -0.30 0 0.49 65 South Carolina 2.63 -46.28 -0.52 0 0.90 66 Nebraska -2.19 7.63 -1.08 -13 -2.61 67 Appalachian State -2.09 -9.28 -1.85 -1 -0.23 68 California -1.30 -25.48 -2.11 1 0.17 69 North Texas -3.20 0.02 -2.13 4 0.65 70 Temple -3.76 -1.93 -2.60 -2 -0.52 71 Cent. Michigan -3.42 -10.63 -2.80 10 1.88 72 Duke -2.64 -21.70 -2.82 3 0.25 73 Mississippi -3.92 -5.41 -2.88 16 3.09 74 Colorado -1.57 -40.51 -3.04 0 -0.07 75 Southern Miss -6.83 29.51 -3.10 -3 -0.37 76 W. Michigan -0.96 -53.79 -3.28 -5 -0.84 77 Kansas St. 1.18 -88.45 -3.56 -1 -0.25 78 Air Force -5.08 -6.45 -3.71 1 0.11 79 Buffalo -2.18 -52.52 -4.03 14 2.43 80 Cincinnati -6.54 4.80 -4.12 -3 -0.80 81 Pittsburgh -4.37 -27.15 -4.24 -11 -1.83 82 Virginia -5.93 -10.41 -4.46 -4 -1.10 83 Louisiana Tech -5.09 -25.85 -4.66 0 0.57 84 Kentucky -0.75 -84.94 -4.67 8 1.67 85 Miami (OH) -7.22 0.11 -4.81 2 0.79 86 UAB -4.91 -35.86 -5.03 9 2.67 87 Wyoming 0.24 -112.08 -5.34 -7 -1.08 88 Massachusetts -8.20 -4.41 -5.68 0 0.20 89 Arkansas -7.83 -13.99 -5.91 -3 -0.52 90 Middle Tenn. St. -7.56 -18.62 -5.96 0 0.18 91 Tulane -4.29 -66.24 -6.11 -9 -0.92 92 Maryland -5.41 -54.24 -6.27 4 1.54 93 Florida -5.90 -49.94 -6.38 -2 -0.06 94 Florida Intl. -7.16 -35.26 -6.50 -10 -1.27 95 Baylor -9.32 -18.63 -7.13 2 0.75 96 New Mexico St. -10.34 -5.54 -7.16 -2 -0.28 97 LA Monroe -6.75 -59.94 -7.44 2 0.53 98 Georgia State -8.97 -35.58 -7.72 4 1.00 99 Utah St. -5.28 -102.96 -8.57 2 -0.09 100 UNLV -8.20 -71.12 -8.96 -2 -1.00 101 North Carolina -8.50 -80.35 -9.61 3 -0.12 102 South Alabama -8.58 -80.83 -9.68 8 3.43 103 Tennessee -6.89 -103.76 -9.69 -18 -4.37 104 Rutgers -7.71 -113.12 -10.69 2 0.19 105 Nevada -8.49 -108.75 -11.00 3 1.09 106 Vanderbilt -8.78 -109.52 -11.23 -3 -1.90 107 West. Kentucky -11.84 -76.77 -11.66 4 2.22 108 Tulsa -8.07 -131.69 -11.85 -3 -1.27 109 Idaho -12.14 -84.85 -12.26 3 1.73 110 New Mexico -15.12 -55.43 -12.80 -10 -4.41 111 Illinois -12.26 -101.07 -13.13 -4 -1.39 112 Coastal Carolina -13.60 -84.36 -13.21 -3 -0.10 113 BYU -13.74 -104.63 -14.30 2 2.02 114 Akron -8.83 -177.10 -14.58 -1 -0.30 115 Hawaii -17.00 -76.31 -15.08 1 1.76 116 Oregon St. -16.38 -92.14 -15.44 -2 -0.74 117 Old Dominion -14.80 -114.97 -15.51 1 2.28 118 Texas St. -18.99 -91.26 -17.14 -1 0.55 119 Connecticut -15.33 -146.65 -17.42 4 3.50 120 Bowling Green -16.04 -157.35 -18.41 0 0.89 121 East Carolina -19.18 -124.19 -18.88 0 0.44 122 LA Lafayette -18.24 -151.65 -19.60 -3 -1.33 123 Georgia Southern -20.58 -141.88 -20.68 -1 0.07 124 UNC-Charlotte -19.72 -153.77 -20.69 0 0.97 125 Rice -24.75 -127.90 -22.78 0 1.41 126 Kansas -24.81 -129.78 -22.91 0 2.59 127 Kent St. -25.60 -174.95 -25.65 1 2.27 128 Ball St. -30.01 -141.02 -26.93 -1 -1.04 129 UTEP -27.53 -210.47 -28.68 0 -0.51 130 San Jose St. -35.86 -248.99 -36.13 0 -1.32 By Conference AAC 11 UCF 22.48 140.74 21.90 21 South Florida 9.22 112.21 11.65 28 Memphis 12.47 33.93 9.98 39 Navy 5.74 49.81 6.27 43 SMU 6.57 13.47 5.04 57 Houston 2.78 -12.51 1.24 70 Temple -3.76 -1.93 -2.60 80 Cincinnati -6.54 4.80 -4.12 91 Tulane -4.29 -66.24 -6.11 108 Tulsa -8.07 -131.69 -11.85 119 Connecticut -15.33 -146.65 -17.42 121 East Carolina -19.18 -124.19 -18.88 ACC 7 Clemson 21.66 193.84 23.96 15 Virginia Tech 16.83 116.40 16.93 16 Miami (FL) 19.48 76.48 16.74 18 Georgia Tech 9.36 149.25 13.57 29 N.C. State 8.27 85.01 9.68 30 Wake Forest 9.73 60.59 9.46 40 Boston Coll. 6.27 26.88 5.50 42 Louisville 0.88 91.50 5.08 47 Syracuse 0.65 66.01 3.67 55 Florida St. 0.55 22.18 1.46 72 Duke -2.64 -21.70 -2.82 81 Pittsburgh -4.37 -27.15 -4.24 82 Virginia -5.93 -10.41 -4.46 101 North Carolina -8.50 -80.35 -9.61 B1G 1 Ohio St. 27.76 264.33 31.48 5 Penn St. 28.06 135.85 25.37 9 Wisconsin 22.49 159.92 22.84 20 Michigan 10.05 111.68 12.18 22 Iowa 16.47 7.85 11.36 25 Michigan St. 8.23 108.56 10.81 33 Purdue 8.19 50.63 7.94 44 Northwestern 6.44 13.15 4.94 58 Minnesota 2.74 -14.91 1.10 60 Indiana -1.60 36.46 0.73 66 Nebraska -2.19 7.63 -1.08 92 Maryland -5.41 -54.24 -6.27 104 Rutgers -7.71 -113.12 -10.69 111 Illinois -12.26 -101.07 -13.13 BXII-II 4 Oklahoma 22.35 220.59 25.73 8 Oklahoma St. 20.25 193.03 22.97 13 TCU 17.24 123.11 17.54 24 Iowa St. 13.88 33.97 10.92 34 West Virginia 6.61 64.96 7.59 38 Texas 6.84 39.10 6.48 49 Texas Tech 2.79 25.02 3.09 77 Kansas St. 1.18 -88.45 -3.56 95 Baylor -9.32 -18.63 -7.13 126 Kansas -24.81 -129.78 -22.91 CUSA 32 Florida Atlantic 12.54 13.37 9.01 52 Marshall 2.21 14.95 2.21 63 UT-San Antonio -3.49 42.22 -0.26 69 North Texas -3.20 0.02 -2.13 75 Southern Miss -6.83 29.51 -3.10 83 Louisiana Tech -5.09 -25.85 -4.66 86 UAB -4.91 -35.86 -5.03 90 Middle Tenn. St. -7.56 -18.62 -5.96 94 Florida Intl. -7.16 -35.26 -6.50 107 West. Kentucky -11.84 -76.77 -11.66 117 Old Dominion -14.80 -114.97 -15.51 124 UNC-Charlotte -19.72 -153.77 -20.69 125 Rice -24.75 -127.90 -22.78 129 UTEP -27.53 -210.47 -28.68 Indies 10 Notre Dame 22.80 139.00 22.02 61 Army 1.44 -4.96 0.72 88 Massachusetts -8.20 -4.41 -5.68 113 BYU -13.74 -104.63 -14.30 MAC 36 Toledo 7.32 47.55 7.22 41 Ohio 6.53 17.28 5.20 45 Northern Illinois 3.77 29.90 3.98 59 East. Michigan 1.36 1.26 0.97 71 Cent. Michigan -3.42 -10.63 -2.80 76 W. Michigan -0.96 -53.79 -3.28 79 Buffalo -2.18 -52.52 -4.03 85 Miami (OH) -7.22 0.11 -4.81 114 Akron -8.83 -177.10 -14.58 120 Bowling Green -16.04 -157.35 -18.41 127 Kent St. -25.60 -174.95 -25.65 128 Ball St. -30.01 -141.02 -26.93 MWC 26 Boise St. 11.21 61.49 10.49 31 San Diego St. 7.45 83.06 9.04 48 Fresno St. 2.55 36.43 3.49 62 Colorado St. -0.17 13.54 0.55 78 Air Force -5.08 -6.45 -3.71 87 Wyoming 0.24 -112.08 -5.34 99 Utah St. -5.28 -102.96 -8.57 100 UNLV -8.20 -71.12 -8.96 105 Nevada -8.49 -108.75 -11.00 110 New Mexico -15.12 -55.43 -12.80 115 Hawaii -17.00 -76.31 -15.08 130 San Jose St. -35.86 -248.99 -36.13 P12 14 Washington 18.98 97.16 17.42 17 USC 13.82 117.56 14.98 19 Washington St. 9.96 140.35 13.53 27 Stanford 12.95 33.63 10.29 35 Arizona 7.60 44.72 7.26 50 Utah 1.56 40.48 3.03 51 Arizona St. 2.69 10.98 2.33 54 Oregon -0.03 33.35 1.62 64 UCLA 0.73 -16.17 -0.30 68 California -1.30 -25.48 -2.11 74 Colorado -1.57 -40.51 -3.04 116 Oregon St. -16.38 -92.14 -15.44 SBC 53 Troy 1.78 12.58 1.81 56 Arkansas St. 3.11 -16.15 1.28 67 Appalachian State -2.09 -9.28 -1.85 96 New Mexico St. -10.34 -5.54 -7.16 97 LA Monroe -6.75 -59.94 -7.44 98 Georgia State -8.97 -35.58 -7.72 102 South Alabama -8.58 -80.83 -9.68 109 Idaho -12.14 -84.85 -12.26 112 Coastal Carolina -13.60 -84.36 -13.21 118 Texas St. -18.99 -91.26 -17.14 122 LA Lafayette -18.24 -151.65 -19.60 123 Georgia Southern -20.58 -141.88 -20.68 SEC 2 Alabama 29.43 233.05 31.06 3 Auburn 25.86 208.37 27.46 6 Georgia 24.77 158.77 24.31 12 Mississippi St. 18.33 138.69 19.03 23 LSU 7.36 123.46 10.96 37 Texas A&M 6.00 51.33 6.52 46 Missouri 4.35 19.90 3.88 65 South Carolina 2.63 -46.28 -0.52 73 Mississippi -3.92 -5.41 -2.88 84 Kentucky -0.75 -84.94 -4.67 89 Arkansas -7.83 -13.99 -5.91 93 Florida -5.90 -49.94 -6.38 103 Tennessee -6.89 -103.76 -9.69 106 Vanderbilt -8.78 -109.52 -11.23
  26. 2 points
    We have a new Number 1!!! After maintaining the top spot since the first DUSHEE rankings came out after week 5, Iowa's shocking obliteration of Ohio State dropped the Buckeyes more than 7 points in DUSHEE score, the largest single team drop of the week. Despite this precipitous fall, Ohio State only dropped to 2nd in the rankings, behind Alabama, but still a point ahead of Georgia who leapfrogged Penn State into 3rd. We are now getting to the point of the season where enough games have been accumulated that it is just difficult statistically to move a lot at the top and bottom of the polls. The Iowa game constitutes 1/9th of Ohio State's schedule at this point, and that share will shrink with each additional game played. Frogs Week-to-Week The Frogs stood pat at 12. At this point in the season, it appears that there are two distinct TCU teams. There is the very good TCU team that scores around four TDs better that the average FBS team. That team showed up Saturday against Texas and is the team that beat SMU, Oklahoma State, Kansas State, and Kansas. Then there is the TCU team that is about one TD better than average. That team beat Arkansas and West Virginia but lost to Iowa State. As usual, the rows in the week-to-week tables are Opponent, Point Differential, Yardage Differential, and DUSHEE Score. @ Ark SMU @ OkSt WVU @ KSU Kan @ ISU Tex 10.00 27.57 33.50 15.14 28.29 17.00 4.43 27.25 29.14 200.71 163.38 -61.86 133.43 388.57 72.00 141.00 8.09 28.16 30.29 7.08 25.36 30.27 6.46 25.04 Frogs Next Opponent Week-to-Week (Oklahoma) Oklahoma's season had been a little less binary than TCU's. They started red hot, averaging 40 points above average against UTEP, Ohio State, and Tulane. Then the Sooners hit a 4-game mid season lull where they were average to slightly above average for Baylor, Iowa State, Texas, and Kansas State. The last two weeks, the Sooners appear to be rolling again, close to early season form. DUSHEE has Oklahoma as a 7.7 point favorite at home (pretty close to the Vegas spread), based on the typical performance for each team. However, if the good TCU team shows up (27.8 DUSHEE Score in 5 games) and Oklahoma returns to its mid-season lull form (10.0 in 4 games), the Frogs beat the Sooners by two TDs. If the Sooners continue to roll at their current level (37.0 in 5 games) and the barely above average TCU team puts on the road whites (7.2 in 3 games), then it will be an ugly day in Norman next Saturday evening. UTEP @ OhSt Tulane @ Bay ISU # Tex @ KSU Ttech @ OkSt 27.25 41.00 40.00 -3.57 4.43 13.75 13.43 23.86 30.13 308.88 412.38 279.00 25.57 85.71 156.75 165.43 238.43 340.00 33.22 47.43 40.26 -1.14 7.13 16.80 17.01 27.52 36.65 Top 3 Performances of the Week 58.05 Iowa vs. Ohio State (+31 Point Margin, +115 Yardage Margin) 42.47 Miami vs. Virginia Tech (+18 PM, +131 YM) 36.65 Oklahoma at Oklahoma St. (+10 PM, +124 YM) Bottom 3 Performances of the Week -46.58 San Jose St. vs. San Diego St. (-45 PM, -448 YM) -45.72 Kent St. vs. Bowling Green (-28 PM, -141 YM) -44.47 Kansas at Baylor (-29 PM, -166 YM) Conference Rankings B10 7.56 B12 6.73 ACC 6.21 SEC 5.52 P12 4.42 AAC -0.31 MWC -6.13 CUSA -9.17 MAC -9.24 SBC -9.77 Overall Rankings Rank Team PD YD Score Rk +/- Score +/- 1 Alabama 30.55 234.71 31.80 1 -1.58 2 Ohio St. 26.79 250.01 30.04 -1 -7.06 3 Georgia 29.31 194.34 29.01 1 -0.94 4 Penn St. 29.74 163.22 27.78 -1 -3.60 5 Notre Dame 28.43 175.32 27.49 1 -1.75 6 Clemson 23.33 205.18 25.55 -1 -4.11 7 Oklahoma 21.14 223.57 24.99 1 0.20 8 UCF 24.86 164.49 24.59 1 -0.13 9 Oklahoma St. 20.77 212.79 24.22 -2 -1.90 10 Auburn 21.87 169.09 22.82 0 0.03 11 Wisconsin 21.24 143.61 21.16 2 0.63 12 TCU 20.40 133.30 20.09 0 -0.59 13 Washington 21.27 118.96 19.98 2 2.09 14 Virginia Tech 18.17 127.15 18.31 -3 -3.90 15 Mississippi St. 17.22 135.88 18.10 -1 -2.02 16 USC 14.38 134.49 16.14 1 1.95 17 Michigan St. 11.71 138.87 14.58 2 1.64 18 Miami (FL) 16.05 70.27 14.12 8 4.22 19 Michigan 10.47 144.63 14.02 2 1.55 20 Washington St. 9.05 150.40 13.36 0 0.48 21 Iowa 17.97 27.19 13.30 8 4.21 22 N.C. State 10.09 100.08 11.60 2 0.42 23 Iowa St. 15.11 28.93 11.48 -7 -2.89 24 Georgia Tech 7.04 134.74 11.26 -6 -2.11 25 LSU 6.72 138.72 11.24 2 1.87 26 South Florida 8.82 106.12 11.05 -4 -0.40 27 Boise St. 10.51 61.81 10.02 4 1.41 28 Texas 10.47 60.60 9.94 -5 -1.43 29 Memphis 12.37 30.66 9.74 -1 0.49 30 Toledo 9.06 72.10 9.56 4 1.49 31 San Diego St. 7.44 75.76 8.65 5 1.15 32 Wake Forest 8.85 46.84 8.18 -2 -0.53 33 West Virginia 7.01 68.05 7.99 5 1.33 34 Stanford 10.77 16.07 7.96 -2 -0.46 35 Purdue 9.00 38.82 7.89 2 0.66 36 Arizona 9.06 37.06 7.85 -11 -2.62 37 Florida Atlantic 10.04 20.53 7.69 4 1.41 38 SMU 7.99 27.34 6.66 5 1.95 39 Boston Coll. 7.23 33.27 6.44 -6 -1.64 40 Syracuse 1.99 86.94 5.56 0 -0.79 41 Texas Tech 3.24 63.55 5.26 -2 -1.28 42 Northwestern 6.14 21.68 5.15 4 0.98 43 Arkansas St. 7.49 1.60 5.07 2 0.59 44 Navy 5.03 33.89 5.00 -9 -3.04 45 Arizona St. 4.91 21.66 4.33 8 1.75 46 Fresno St. 3.53 31.70 3.90 -4 -2.19 47 Northern Illinois 2.81 26.76 3.17 9 2.23 48 Texas A&M 3.93 9.89 3.10 0 -0.95 49 Louisville -1.04 71.80 2.81 1 -0.38 50 Oregon 0.76 40.00 2.46 -1 -1.35 51 Utah 1.38 16.79 1.74 16 2.93 52 East. Michigan 2.52 -1.54 1.61 10 2.26 53 Nebraska 0.78 20.78 1.53 -6 -2.55 54 Florida St. 0.37 25.85 1.51 -3 -1.31 55 Indiana -1.05 44.05 1.44 -1 -1.05 56 Missouri 2.54 -8.67 1.27 9 2.43 57 Marshall 0.58 13.50 1.05 7 1.96 58 Houston 1.84 -11.59 0.66 -6 -2.03 59 Colorado St. -0.68 20.74 0.56 -4 -1.17 60 Ohio 2.12 -27.08 0.09 12 3.33 61 Troy -0.57 3.93 -0.19 -2 -0.03 62 Army 0.64 -15.98 -0.35 13 3.21 63 Minnesota 0.68 -23.15 -0.68 -6 -0.73 64 UCLA 0.21 -19.33 -0.80 -20 -5.36 65 South Carolina 3.19 -72.79 -1.42 15 2.70 66 Appalachian State -1.70 -9.86 -1.61 -8 -1.66 67 UT-San Antonio -5.07 35.22 -1.67 -4 -0.81 68 Temple -3.31 2.70 -2.08 13 2.54 69 California -1.61 -24.82 -2.28 -1 -0.71 70 Pittsburgh -2.60 -13.91 -2.41 -4 -1.25 71 W. Michigan -0.37 -44.90 -2.44 0 -0.37 72 Southern Miss -5.98 25.82 -2.73 -12 -2.32 73 North Texas -4.55 5.05 -2.79 5 1.15 74 Colorado -1.05 -46.46 -2.96 -13 -2.38 75 Duke -2.97 -22.50 -3.07 -1 0.47 76 Kansas St. 1.33 -86.17 -3.31 6 1.51 77 Cincinnati -5.88 12.10 -3.33 -8 -1.31 78 Virginia -4.98 -0.94 -3.36 6 1.95 79 Air Force -4.77 -13.00 -3.81 -9 -1.77 80 Wyoming 0.09 -88.75 -4.26 7 1.82 81 Cent. Michigan -5.79 -16.86 -4.68 7 1.58 82 Tulane -2.89 -66.94 -5.19 -6 -1.54 83 Louisiana Tech -4.50 -45.67 -5.23 -4 -1.12 84 Florida Intl. -5.52 -31.83 -5.23 19 4.73 85 Tennessee -3.17 -65.67 -5.32 1 0.40 86 Arkansas -6.41 -22.81 -5.39 -3 -0.20 87 Miami (OH) -8.32 -0.93 -5.59 4 1.61 88 Massachusetts -8.65 -2.28 -5.88 10 2.86 89 Mississippi -7.00 -26.81 -5.97 3 1.45 90 Middle Tenn. St. -8.11 -15.04 -6.14 7 2.52 91 Florida -7.02 -33.77 -6.33 -14 -2.63 92 Kentucky -2.78 -92.11 -6.34 -3 -0.01 93 Buffalo -4.08 -76.86 -6.46 -8 -0.76 94 New Mexico St. -10.18 -1.95 -6.88 2 1.44 95 UAB -7.62 -53.86 -7.71 6 1.72 96 Maryland -5.18 -89.29 -7.81 -23 -4.45 97 Baylor -8.46 -45.85 -7.87 -4 -0.19 98 UNLV -6.37 -76.22 -7.96 -3 -0.06 99 LA Monroe -7.26 -64.35 -7.98 8 3.27 100 New Mexico -11.87 -9.95 -8.40 -6 -0.60 101 Utah St. -5.21 -102.86 -8.48 -1 0.85 102 Georgia State -9.01 -55.68 -8.72 -12 -1.98 103 Vanderbilt -6.43 -103.53 -9.33 6 3.05 104 North Carolina -8.96 -72.15 -9.49 -2 0.06 105 Tulsa -6.93 -122.23 -10.58 -6 -1.63 106 Rutgers -7.08 -126.59 -10.88 -1 -0.27 107 Illinois -10.69 -94.77 -11.74 -3 -1.20 108 Nevada -10.58 -103.43 -12.09 -2 -1.05 109 Coastal Carolina -13.13 -89.47 -13.11 1 -0.72 110 South Alabama -12.35 -100.21 -13.11 2 -0.31 111 West. Kentucky -13.46 -100.77 -13.88 -3 -1.85 112 Idaho -13.71 -99.48 -13.99 4 3.95 113 Akron -7.87 -185.30 -14.27 0 -0.33 114 Oregon St. -16.66 -73.79 -14.70 -3 -2.01 115 BYU -16.31 -111.74 -16.32 3 3.08 116 Hawaii -19.42 -79.90 -16.84 -2 0.34 117 Texas St. -20.35 -84.60 -17.69 0 1.47 118 Old Dominion -17.98 -119.19 -17.80 -3 -0.29 119 LA Lafayette -16.66 -147.22 -18.28 0 1.65 120 Bowling Green -17.63 -155.03 -19.31 1 2.84 121 East Carolina -20.12 -121.31 -19.33 -1 0.61 122 Georgia Southern -21.13 -136.73 -20.75 1 1.80 123 Connecticut -18.35 -178.21 -20.91 5 4.38 124 UNC-Charlotte -20.15 -168.71 -21.66 -2 0.53 125 Rice -25.96 -141.19 -24.19 2 0.94 126 Kansas -27.04 -153.34 -25.49 -2 -2.40 127 Ball St. -28.71 -138.59 -25.89 -1 -1.15 128 Kent St. -27.73 -193.61 -27.92 -3 -3.38 129 UTEP -26.76 -212.05 -28.17 0 -1.58 130 San Jose St. -34.01 -248.96 -34.80 0 -0.15 By Conference AAC 8 UCF 24.86 164.49 24.59 26 South Florida 8.82 106.12 11.05 29 Memphis 12.37 30.66 9.74 38 SMU 7.99 27.34 6.66 44 Navy 5.03 33.89 5.00 58 Houston 1.84 -11.59 0.66 68 Temple -3.31 2.70 -2.08 77 Cincinnati -5.88 12.10 -3.33 82 Tulane -2.89 -66.94 -5.19 105 Tulsa -6.93 -122.23 -10.58 121 East Carolina -20.12 -121.31 -19.33 123 Connecticut -18.35 -178.21 -20.91 ACC 6 Clemson 23.33 205.18 25.55 14 Virginia Tech 18.17 127.15 18.31 18 Miami (FL) 16.05 70.27 14.12 22 N.C. State 10.09 100.08 11.60 24 Georgia Tech 7.04 134.74 11.26 32 Wake Forest 8.85 46.84 8.18 39 Boston Coll. 7.23 33.27 6.44 40 Syracuse 1.99 86.94 5.56 49 Louisville -1.04 71.80 2.81 54 Florida St. 0.37 25.85 1.51 70 Pittsburgh -2.60 -13.91 -2.41 75 Duke -2.97 -22.50 -3.07 78 Virginia -4.98 -0.94 -3.36 104 North Carolina -8.96 -72.15 -9.49 B1G 2 Ohio St. 26.79 250.01 30.04 4 Penn St. 29.74 163.22 27.78 11 Wisconsin 21.24 143.61 21.16 17 Michigan St. 11.71 138.87 14.58 19 Michigan 10.47 144.63 14.02 21 Iowa 17.97 27.19 13.30 35 Purdue 9.00 38.82 7.89 42 Northwestern 6.14 21.68 5.15 53 Nebraska 0.78 20.78 1.53 55 Indiana -1.05 44.05 1.44 63 Minnesota 0.68 -23.15 -0.68 96 Maryland -5.18 -89.29 -7.81 106 Rutgers -7.08 -126.59 -10.88 107 Illinois -10.69 -94.77 -11.74 BXII-II 7 Oklahoma 21.14 223.57 24.99 9 Oklahoma St. 20.77 212.79 24.22 12 TCU 20.40 133.30 20.09 23 Iowa St. 15.11 28.93 11.48 28 Texas 10.47 60.60 9.94 33 West Virginia 7.01 68.05 7.99 41 Texas Tech 3.24 63.55 5.26 76 Kansas St. 1.33 -86.17 -3.31 97 Baylor -8.46 -45.85 -7.87 126 Kansas -27.04 -153.34 -25.49 CUSA 37 Florida Atlantic 10.04 20.53 7.69 57 Marshall 0.58 13.50 1.05 67 UT-San Antonio -5.07 35.22 -1.67 72 Southern Miss -5.98 25.82 -2.73 73 North Texas -4.55 5.05 -2.79 83 Louisiana Tech -4.50 -45.67 -5.23 84 Florida Intl. -5.52 -31.83 -5.23 90 Middle Tenn. St. -8.11 -15.04 -6.14 95 UAB -7.62 -53.86 -7.71 111 West. Kentucky -13.46 -100.77 -13.88 118 Old Dominion -17.98 -119.19 -17.80 124 UNC-Charlotte -20.15 -168.71 -21.66 125 Rice -25.96 -141.19 -24.19 129 UTEP -26.76 -212.05 -28.17 Indies 5 Notre Dame 28.43 175.32 27.49 62 Army 0.64 -15.98 -0.35 88 Massachusetts -8.65 -2.28 -5.88 115 BYU -16.31 -111.74 -16.32 MAC 30 Toledo 9.06 72.10 9.56 47 Northern Illinois 2.81 26.76 3.17 52 East. Michigan 2.52 -1.54 1.61 60 Ohio 2.12 -27.08 0.09 71 W. Michigan -0.37 -44.90 -2.44 81 Cent. Michigan -5.79 -16.86 -4.68 87 Miami (OH) -8.32 -0.93 -5.59 93 Buffalo -4.08 -76.86 -6.46 113 Akron -7.87 -185.30 -14.27 120 Bowling Green -17.63 -155.03 -19.31 127 Ball St. -28.71 -138.59 -25.89 128 Kent St. -27.73 -193.61 -27.92 MWC 27 Boise St. 10.51 61.81 10.02 31 San Diego St. 7.44 75.76 8.65 46 Fresno St. 3.53 31.70 3.90 59 Colorado St. -0.68 20.74 0.56 79 Air Force -4.77 -13.00 -3.81 80 Wyoming 0.09 -88.75 -4.26 98 UNLV -6.37 -76.22 -7.96 100 New Mexico -11.87 -9.95 -8.40 101 Utah St. -5.21 -102.86 -8.48 108 Nevada -10.58 -103.43 -12.09 116 Hawaii -19.42 -79.90 -16.84 130 San Jose St. -34.01 -248.96 -34.80 P12 13 Washington 21.27 118.96 19.98 16 USC 14.38 134.49 16.14 20 Washington St. 9.05 150.40 13.36 34 Stanford 10.77 16.07 7.96 36 Arizona 9.06 37.06 7.85 45 Arizona St. 4.91 21.66 4.33 50 Oregon 0.76 40.00 2.46 51 Utah 1.38 16.79 1.74 64 UCLA 0.21 -19.33 -0.80 69 California -1.61 -24.82 -2.28 74 Colorado -1.05 -46.46 -2.96 114 Oregon St. -16.66 -73.79 -14.70 SBC 43 Arkansas St. 7.49 1.60 5.07 61 Troy -0.57 3.93 -0.19 66 Appalachian State -1.70 -9.86 -1.61 94 New Mexico St. -10.18 -1.95 -6.88 99 LA Monroe -7.26 -64.35 -7.98 102 Georgia State -9.01 -55.68 -8.72 109 Coastal Carolina -13.13 -89.47 -13.11 110 South Alabama -12.35 -100.21 -13.11 112 Idaho -13.71 -99.48 -13.99 117 Texas St. -20.35 -84.60 -17.69 119 LA Lafayette -16.66 -147.22 -18.28 122 Georgia Southern -21.13 -136.73 -20.75 SEC 1 Alabama 30.55 234.71 31.80 3 Georgia 29.31 194.34 29.01 10 Auburn 21.87 169.09 22.82 15 Mississippi St. 17.22 135.88 18.10 25 LSU 6.72 138.72 11.24 48 Texas A&M 3.93 9.89 3.10 56 Missouri 2.54 -8.67 1.27 65 South Carolina 3.19 -72.79 -1.42 85 Tennessee -3.17 -65.67 -5.32 86 Arkansas -6.41 -22.81 -5.39 89 Mississippi -7.00 -26.81 -5.97 91 Florida -7.02 -33.77 -6.33 92 Kentucky -2.78 -92.11 -6.34 103 Vanderbilt -6.43 -103.53 -9.33
  27. 2 points
    If you liked my last post, you're gonna love this one. Prior to looking at college basketball team performance metrics from a historical perspective, I started by looking at the same numbers for college football. Using the same fantastic site, College Football Reference, I pulled the yearly SRS (Simple Rating System) and a 5-year moving average for each team over their history and plotted them over time. Unlike the basketball numbers which only go back to 1950, the college football SRS scores have been calculated throughout most of the whole history of college football, even back into the 1890's in some cases. This first post will look at the conferences that TCU has been a part of. The next post will look at the rest of college football. We'll start the same way we started the basketball post, by looking at the Texas colleges Texas Schools Here is the history of Texas college football teams going back to 1903, when the first SRS scores for Texas, A&M, and TCU were calculated. According to the SRS metric, the 1947 Texas team is the best team in the history of the state while the Longhorns of the early 1970s was the best program. The 1955 Horned Frogs were the best TCU team by the SRS metric, followed closely by the 1938 MNC team and the 2014 team. Also note that other than the Houston Cougars of the early 1970s, those late 1950's Frogs were the best program in the history of the state that didn't wear burnt orange. Acknowledging that this is a busy chart, we break up this history into 3 eras. The first couple of decades of the 20th century were dominated by Texas and A&M, but things start getting a little more competitive around the time the Great Depression hits: There have only been 3 significant eras in which Texas was not the dominant team in the state. The first two, from 1930-1940 and from 1956-1961, were dominated by the Horned Frogs. World War II was bad for every Texas team, except the Longhorns, the only school whose moving SRS trended up during the war. Another interesting trend is that the performance of the private schools seems to be pretty closely correlated during this time. While TCU tended to peak higher than the others, when TCU was good, SMU, Rice, and to a lesser extent, Baylor (they got good in the '50s, not so much in the '30s) were also good. When TCU was bad, all the private schools tended to be bad. Then comes the protracted dismal mediocrity of TCU football leading up to the dissolution of the SWC ... This period of time shows most of the third era not dominated by UT, the Sherrill/Slocum A&M years which emerge from the precipitous decline of SMU after the death penalty and the wild oscillations of Houston, caught in a morbid cycle of cheating and draconian punishment. We'll talk a little more about the collapse of the SWC in the next section. Then we have the post-SWC years: This era is notable for the slow and steady rise of the Frogs, the bottoming out and then rapid ascent of Baylor, and then the emergence of perhaps a 4th era of non-Longhorn dominance with Baylor, TCU, and A&M outperforming Texas over the last 3-4 years. SWC Again, since the SWC was pretty much the same schools as above, sans UTEP, UNT, and Texas State, avec Arkansas, and Tech and Houston only appear after they joined, respectively, this will look similar to the above chart. Perhaps the thing that stands out the most to me is the fact that Arkansas was a non-factor in the conference until 1960 or so. And they had fallen off significantly from their early 80s high before they left for the SEC in 1992. Which indicates that it wasn't the move to the SEC that hurt the Hogs; they had been sliding toward mediocrity for the better part of the decade prior. The next chart shows the early years. The short tenures of the Oklahoma schools are included, but not Southwestern's sole year as a member. SMU was added as Oklahoma left and TCU was added as Oklahoma State (nee Oklahoma A&M) left. Not surprisingly, the AP MNC teams (1939 A&M and 1938 TCU) were the best teams of this era. Next we see the true heyday of the conference, from the end of WWII through the early 1960's. From 1947-1961 (and if you ignore Tech who struggled for a number of years after being admitted to the SWC, you can expand the time frame out to 1968), not a single program in the conference had a below average 5-year MAV. By the end of this heyday, Texas and Arkansas had clearly separated from the rest of the conference and the other schools were all in states of relative decline, but until the late 1960's, every program in the conference was better than most. Despite the parity during these years, Texas was the dominant program throughout, save for the brief era of Frog predominance in the late 50s -- the seven best individual seasons during this time were all by the Longhorns, the best being the 1947 team. Then we come to the end. If you take a snapshot of the early 80s, the conference still looks pretty salty. Texas and Arkansas have come back to the pack a little bit but are still very good. Jackie Sherrill has begun to make A&M relevant, Houston comes into the league immediately competitive, and SMU gets really good. Of course, in hindsight, we know why this all happened ... A&M, Houston, and SMU were all blatantly cheating. But setting that aside, the SWC circa 1980 is still a damn fine football conference. But then things go bad quickly. A&M, Houston, and SMU all get hit with NCAA sanctions and fall precipitously. Texas and Arkansas continue to slide. Then Arkansas bolts to the SEC. Houston miraculously starts getting good again, then gets busted for cheating again, and then gets really bad very quickly. A few notes about the 1984 TCU team. A common mythology about the Wacker-led Frogs is that the team was on the verge of ascendancy before the NCAA levied the "Living Death Penalty" on the Frogs in 1985. However, based on the SRS metric at least, there isn't a lot of evidence to support either an emerging Frog powerhouse or a sharp decline after the sanctions hit. The 1984 team was the beneficiary of a particularly weak conference that year. TCU had an SRS around 6 (i.e., the Frogs were about 6 points better, on average, than an average college football team), which is good, especially compared to the teams immediately before and after, but not spectacular. The teams with higher SRS that season, SMU, Arkansas, and Texas, were all only a few points higher than the Frogs that year. And when looking at the 5-year MAV, the Frogs had climbed a little from their late 1970s low, but the program was remarkably and consistently mediocre from 1979 through the end of the conference, staying between an SRS of 0 to -5. Compare the Frog's MAV to Houston's over the same time period. Cougar fans could reasonably argue that they suffered two "Living Death Penalties" over a 15-year period, with two performance declines that followed NCAA sanctions that rivaled the decline SMU suffered after the Actual Death Penalty. Which leads to another point. At the time when the conference collapsed, there were four teams with above average MAVs and four teams with below average MAVs. All politics aside, it was the four above average teams that were invited to the Big 12 and the four below average teams that were left behind. In some alternate universe, if Houston had not suffered the severe NCAA sanctions imposed during the Jenkins era and had remained at least above average for the remaining half-decade, would the Cougars have bumped Baylor or Tech as the fourth invitee to the Big 12? Houston never had the political clout that Baylor had, and probably not even the clout Tech had, but would the legislature have felt pressure to get the other state school invited? Enough to get five Texas teams invited to the Big 12? Or would that have caused Nebraska to blow the whole merger up before it started? If Houston had stayed good, would there have been a Big 12? All told, the SWC at the time of the collapse was an awfully mediocre football conference. Probably more on par with the MWC conference we played in (perhaps not even as strong at the top as that conference, but probably not quite as weak at the bottom either) than with the current slate of "Power 5" conferences. But of course, that alternate universe is not ours. In ours, the Frogs then joined the ... WAC/MWC (preceded by the Rocky Mountain/Mountain States Athletic/Skyline Conference) As was the case with the basketball charts, the WAC/MWC chart is a holy mess of schools across multiple conferences. Since I was primarily interested in the dynastic strength of programs over time more than a rigorous history of conference membership, I thought it more interesting to look at programs across conferences. So forgive the messiness ... The first chart shows the conference around the time of TCU's inclusion. As we entered, BYU was still king with an emergent Colorado State and Air Force. And you can see right off the bat why the "Gang of 5" might have been less than enthused about the teams added to their conference. Rice, TCU, SMU, Tulsa, San Jose, and UNLV all come in in 1996 as well below average teams; of the members prior to that season, only the soon-to-be abandoned UTEP was as bad as the six new teams. The MWC splits after the 1998 season, leaving all the new additions behind and Urban Meyer's Utes begin to ascend, topped off by the best ever WAC/MWC team in 2004. Boise joins the WAC after we leave in 2000, becoming with Fresno, the only good WAC programs for much of the 2000s. TCU joins the MWC in 2005 and the conference quickly becomes the three-headed Hydra monster of TCU, Utah, and BYU. A declining Fresno leaves Boise as the only good team in the WAC and they join the MWC after Utah and BYU bolt in 2011. The WAC folds as a football conference after the 2012 season and the MWC is left with a declining Boise, and a sharply ascendant Utah State and San Diego State. The next chart shows the WAC prior to the failed 16-team experiment. This conference started out as the Rocky Mountain Conference and included Colorado, Colorado College, Colorado School of Mines, Denver, and Utah State. The Colorado schools were all pretty dominant in the early days of the conference but began to decline rapidly as World War II approached and were not invited to the Mountain States/Skyline Conference when it formed in 1938. Utah had the first period of dominance in the early Depression era. BYU was surprisingly uncompetitive and remained so all the way into the early 1970s. After WWII, Colorado leaves and joins the then Big 7 and is replaced by Montana. In 1963, the WAC was formed, leaving out Montana, Denver, and Utah State and adding New Mexico, Arizona, and Arizona State. ASU is one of, if not the, dominant program in the conference (bumping Wyoming's decade-long run of relative dominance) until they and Arizona leave for the PAC 10 after the 1977 season. UTEP joins in 1968, and after the Arizona schools leave, San Diego State, Hawaii, and Air Force join in consecutive years. At this point, BYU emerges as the dominant program. CUSA/AAC Ever so briefly, the Frogs were in Conference USA. CUSA was formed the year after the SWC dissolved, with Houston landing there while the rest of the SWC rejects went to the WAC. Many of the founding members of CUSA were playing as football independents prior to forming the conference, but most had spent some time in the Missouri Valley Conference at some point. A lot of teams have come in and out of CUSA and most of the original members are now in the American Athletic Conference (AAC) which formed after the dissolution of the Big East as a football conference. In the chart below, the schools shown after the formation of the AAC are a hodge-podge of teams currently in both conferences, but I didn't include many of the WAC and Sun Belt teams that moved to CUSA after the AAC split. The chart is busy enough already, and those teams are accounted for in Part 2. When the conference formed, USM, ECU, Louisville, and Memphis all enter having been consistently average over the previous decade. Cincinnati had been pretty bad in the early 1990s but had pulled themselves up to nearly average by the time the CUSA formed. Tulsa, who had largely been in league with these other schools, went to the WAC initially, but joined CUSA with SMU and Rice after they defected from the WAC. The first decade of CUSA was dominated buy Southern Miss. Tulane was bad at the outset of the conference, but became competitive in quickly with the Shaun King-led undefeated 1998 team, then quickly faded back into mediocrity. Louisville was becoming ascendant just as they left to join the Big East, culminating with the best ever CUSA season in 2004. The ascendant Louisville years coincide with TCU's brief tenure in the conference, and USM, Louisville, and TCU all battled for conference supremacy in the early 2000, but all three programs were far from world-beaters at the time with SRS MAVs around 5. In 2005, the conference underwent a wholesale change of members as Louisville, Cincinnati, and USF went to the Big East, TCU went to the Mountain West, and Army went Independent. Tulsa, SMU, Rice, and UTEP came over from the WAC; UCF joined, and Marshall moved from the MAC. From this point, the conference has seen the emergence of Houston, Tulsa, and UCF. The next chart shows the history of most of the founding members of CUSA before starting the conference. This history includes a very incomplete history of some of the Missouri Valley teams that showed up on their schedules often throughout their histories. Of all the CUSA founders, Tulsa has been playing "big time" college football the longest, dating back to their inclusion in the Missouri Valley prior to the Great Depression. At that time the conference included former SWC outcast Oklahoma State/A&M and schools like Grinnell, Creighton, Drake, and Washington(Mo). Tulsa largely dominated these early years. As many of these schools began to drop down in classification and Oklahoma State left to join the Big 8, Cincinnati and North Texas appear in the mid 1950s followed by Memphis, USM, Louisville and New Mexico State in the 1960s. Tulane leaves the SEC and starts playing many of these schools in 1966 and East Carolina appears in 1977. Memphis was the strongest team of the group during the 1960s. The 70s saw Memphis, Tulane, and ECU battling for supremacy and the 80s saw the dominance of USM. Tune in next week when we talk about the Big 6/7/8/12/XII-II and the rest of college football.
  28. 2 points
    She stands tall and fair and impossible to overlook in the Managua airport’s duty free shop. Her ash-blond hair and heaven-blue eyes cause more than one head to glance a second, a third time in her direction. Her name is Evelina. She’s 18 and Nicaraguan, but bears only latent genes from her tropics-born mother. Instead her features carry the memory of her East German father, long-returned to his homeland. Perhaps her delicate cheek bones and milky complexion are the only memories her mother has of her lover, one of hundreds of military advisors whose tour of duty brought them to this hot and dusty outpost. Evelina is a woman-child born of a brief union between a soldier chilled by loneliness and a woman burning with a desire to escape a nation destroyed by war and political intrigue. Her hair is pulled back and fastened with a black bow, exposing her ears and throat, emphasizing her whiteness next to her light bronze coworkers. She is tall and slim, nearly a head taller than her Latin companions, an especially beautiful flower standing a bit more lovely than the others in their little garden. Evelina sells watches and perfumes and T-shirts and American liquors to departing international travelers. I sit observing her from the chairs in front of her shop. I see her watch the departing passengers standing in line to board their plane. I wonder how much of her heart leaves with them. Does it seek someone like herself? Does it seek a country where she does not stand out so emphatically as being different? She shares a joke with Marvina, their laughter mingling on its way to where I sit. Marvina’s laughter is like thick, sweet honey, Evelina’s like water bubbling from a cold spring. Even as her lips grace her admirers with a smile, there is a distant look in her eyes. How cold is the loneliness of her own heart every time she looks in the mirror and thinks of a father she never saw? What are the passions that burn within as she works in a menial job, earning barely enough to pay her tuition as she seeks to escape the same desperation that entrapped her mother? I feel drawn to her, to ask her these questions, to listen to her open her heart. But...no…for now I hear my flight called. I rise from my watching-place and cast a final glance her way. Good-bye, fair Evelina. May you someday follow your heart to find whatever it is you seek.
  29. 2 points
    This was a joke told many years ago by Will Rogers which I borrowed and turned into a poem. I now post it to FrogAblog, and dedicate it to Baylor administrators, coaches and fans. When A Feller Oughta Keep Quiet Let me tell you `bout a mountain lion a `way out in th' west. When it come to killin' cows an' sheep, why, he must've been th' best. A reg'lar varmint legend of widespread renown, He was the scourge of ranchers for a'hunnerd miles around. While passin' through a cattle ranch he killed hisself a bull, He ate an' ate, an' stuffed hisself until he was plumb full! Then to celebrate th' feast, or maybe cuz he was bored, That fat ol' mountain lion rared back and roared…an' roared…an' roared! Now all the caterwaulin' that th' mountain lion had done Caught the ear of a passin' cowboy, who pulled out his trusty gun. He took his aim.his shot was true.an' to that cat's su'prise, Th' cowboy shot hisself a lion! Smack between th' eyes! So the moral to my story, with no "if" "and" or "but," Is when a feller's full o' bull. he'd best keep his mouth shut!
  30. 2 points
    This season, to prepare for the bowls, I'm expanding on a bit I did two years ago and looking at the predictive capability of my scrappy little model. So we're going to look at what DUSHEE says compared to Vegas bookies, Jeff Sagarin, and ESPN's FPI ranking. ESPN's FPI results in a number that is very comparable to DUSHEE; it is a point total relative to an average FBS team. Sagarin's system scale is different; the best team in the country is generally around a 100, but the difference in two teams' scores is effectively the point spread between the two teams. For 28 of the 39 bowl games, DUSHEE, Sagarin, FPI and Vegas come to a unanimous consensus about the favorite, although there can be considerable variation among the four as to the point spread. Since there are two formulations for DUSHEE, 1) the original which looks solely at point and yardage margins compared to how the other teams compared against the same opponent, and 2) the revised which deemphasizes statistical outliers and emphasizes strength-of-schedule, I'll provide numbers for both formulations and the average of the two to see how well each of the three predict outcomes. First, we'll start with the bowl our readers probably care about the most ... the Cactus Bowl. Liberty Bowl Just kidding. The Liberty Bowl is one of the 11 bowl games where the 4 predictors do not come to a consensus and is one of two where the lack of consensus comes from the Vegas bookies. Here are the numbers for the two teams: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Georgia 7-5 1.51 2.18 73.19 7.40 0.73 TCU 6-6 3.55 5.03 74.53 10.10 1.16 In the following table and all of the ones that follow, DO means DUSHEE Original Formulation, DR is DUSHEE Revised, DA is the average of the two DUSHEE models, Sag is Sagarin and FPI is, well, FPI. Ignore the sign in front of the number; it is just used to account for which of the two teams is the favorite. DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI TCU -2.04 TCU -2.85 TCU -2.44 Georgia 1 TCU -1.34 TCU -2.7 The "computer" models all agree that the Frogs are a slight favorite with Sagarin at roughly 1.5-points and DUSHEE Revised at almost 3-points. However, Vegas, at the moment, has the Dawgs as a 1-point favorite. As we will see, the agreement between the models (a range of less than 4-points between all of the predictors) is quite tight compared to some of the other games. New Years Six Orange: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Florida St. 9-3 15.99 21.43 87.35 21.50 5.55 Michigan 10-2 32.77 36.95 99.74 27.80 3.18 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI Michigan -16.79 Michigan -15.52 Michigan -16.15 Michigan -6.5 Michigan -12.39 Michigan -6.3 The models are unanimous that Michigan is the favorite, but DUSHEE and Sagarin think Michigan is a significantly larger favorite than either Vegas or the FPI does. Peach: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Alabama 13-0 37.11 45.21 105.37 31.70 6.77 Washington 12-1 24.52 26.25 97.89 26.10 -0.22 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI Alabama 12.60 Alabama 18.96 Alabama 15.78 Alabama 16.5 Alabama 7.48 Alabama 5.6 In this case, DUSHEE and Vegas are on the same page, placing Alabama as a 2TD+ favorite, but Sagarin and the FPI have the game at a TD or less. Fiesta: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Clemson 12-1 25.65 30.08 94.50 25.80 3.99 Ohio St. 11-1 34.82 40.78 102.06 28.10 5.37 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI Ohio St. -9.17 Ohio St. -10.71 Ohio St. -9.94 Ohio St. -3 Ohio St. -7.56 Ohio St. -2.3 Like the Orange Bowl, DUSHEE and Sagarin agree that Ohio State is a 7-10 point favorite but Vegas and the FPI have the game around a field goal. Cotton: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS W. Michigan 13-0 17.94 15.09 84.62 13.00 -5.60 Wisconsin 10-3 17.82 22.13 90.62 17.80 5.14 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI W. Michigan 0.12 Wisconsin -7.04 Wisconsin -3.46 Wisconsin -7.5 Wisconsin -6.00 Wisconsin -4.8 The Cotton Bowl illuminates the difference between the two DUSHEE formulations. Western Michigan and Wisconsin have the biggest strength-of-schedule disparity of any two bowl opponents. Original DUSHEE, which does account for strength of schedule but does not emphasize it to the degree that Revised DUSHEE does, has Western Michigan as an ever-so-slight favorite. Revised DUSHEE, Sagarin, and Vegas all have Wisconsin at about a TD favorite, with the FPI putting the game a little closer. This will be an interesting game to see play out. Rose: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Penn St. 11-2 16.69 19.59 91.97 18.00 3.37 USC 9-3 16.41 21.29 90.65 20.30 4.99 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI Penn St. 0.28 USC -1.70 USC -0.71 USC -7 Penn St. 1.32 USC -2.3 The Rose is another interesting case in that all the models have the game as a near toss-up except for Vegas which has the Trojans as a TD favorite. It is conceivable that bettors are giving USC a home-field advantage boost which would account for some of the disparity, but even with the 3-points, Vegas likes USC more than any of the computer models do. Sugar: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Auburn 8-4 17.54 21.16 84.64 20.10 6.32 Oklahoma 10-2 19.23 22.39 90.29 21.90 2.66 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI Oklahoma -1.70 Oklahoma -1.24 Oklahoma -1.47 Oklahoma -5.5 Oklahoma -5.65 Oklahoma -1.8 DUSHEE and the FPI have Oklahoma as a slight favorite, Vegas and Sagarin like them a little more. Other Big XII-II and Bowls Aside from TCU and Oklahoma, four other conference mates managed to become bowl eligible. Three are unanimous underdogs in their matchups. Cactus: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Baylor 6-6 1.91 3.06 67.00 7.40 -0.54 Boise St. 10-2 13.25 12.41 79.05 11.00 -2.08 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI Boise St. -11.34 Boise St. -9.35 Boise St. -10.35 Boise St. -7.5 Boise St. -12.05 Boise St. -3.6 Only the FPI has this game within a touchdown and both DUSHEE and Sagarin think the Broncos are at least two-score (as in football scores, not Gettysburg Address scores) favorites. Given Baylors' nose dive at the end of the season, it seems like the Broncos are a safe bet, if you are a betting man. Russell Athletic: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Miami (FL) 8-4 11.98 12.17 82.72 16.00 1.63 West Virginia 10-2 10.05 11.40 82.25 14.10 1.13 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI Miami (FL) 1.92 Miami (FL) 0.77 Miami (FL) 1.35 Miami (FL) 3 Miami (FL) 0.47 Miami (FL) 1.9 The models are all unanimous in favor of the Hurricanes, but they are also unanimous that this is a close matchup. Vegas has the largest spread at 3-points and all the models are within 2.5 points. Texas: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Texas A&M 8-4 5.81 8.65 81.03 16.20 4.16 Kansas St. 8-4 4.90 4.69 81.36 11.30 0.31 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI Texas A&M 0.91 Texas A&M 3.96 Texas A&M 2.44 Texas A&M 2 Kansas St. -0.33 Texas A&M 4.9 This should also be a tight game with the FPI giving the Aggies a 5-point advantage and Sagarin giving the Fighting Snyders a not-quite-half-point advantage. Vegas splits the difference at a 2-point Agricultural spread. Alamo: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Colorado 10-3 16.06 20.77 89.05 16.30 6.14 Oklahoma St. 9-3 6.72 7.81 82.93 15.40 1.62 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI Colorado -9.34 Colorado -12.96 Colorado -11.15 Colorado -3 Colorado -6.12 Colorado -0.9 All of the models are unanimous about Colorado in the sequel to the epic Bram Kohlhausen show of last year. However, DUSHEE was pretty down on Oklahoma State this year in comparison to other models. While most models had OSU easily in the Top-25, DUSHEE had the Cowboys at 33 and 32. DUSHEE dinged the Pokes for below average performances against Central Michigan, Baylor, Kansas, and Oklahoma, with that Baylor loss in week 4 looking worse and worse as the season went along. Thus, DUSHEE has Colorado as a double-digit favorite while the other models all have Colorado between a 1-to-6 point favorite. Other Bowls of Texas Note Las Vegas: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Houston 9-3 14.19 15.71 81.10 10.60 -0.45 San Diego St. 10-3 8.40 4.69 72.07 6.30 -6.44 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI Houston 5.79 Houston 11.02 Houston 8.41 Houston 3.5 Houston 9.03 Houston 4.3 The models are unanimous for Houston with Vegas being the least enthusiastic about their chances. A big discrepancy in Strength-of-Schedule between these two teams which means Revised DUSHEE likes Houston even more than Original DUSHEE which litkes the Cougars a lot more than Vegas or the FPI. Sagarin and the DUSHEE Average are about on the same page for Houston. Armed Forces: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Navy 9-3 6.54 7.67 73.73 4.80 1.50 Louisiana Tech 8-4 7.69 4.24 67.27 3.60 -5.39 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI Louisiana Tech -1.15 Navy 3.43 Navy 1.14 Louisiana Tech -3.5 Navy 6.46 Navy 1.2 Another big Strength-of-Schedule disparity probably is the cause of such a mixed bag of predictions here with Original DUSHEE and Vegas leaning toward Terry Bradshaw's alma mater and Revised DUSHEE and everyone else leaning toward Roger Dodger's alma mater. Heart of Dallas: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Army 7-5 -0.89 -5.12 63.12 -1.80 -5.40 North Texas 5-7 -15.64 -19.55 50.84 -15.40 -3.93 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI Army 14.75 Army 14.44 Army 14.59 Army 10 Army 12.28 Army 13.6 No one thinks this will be a close game, not because Army is a juggernaut but because North Texas is a ridiculous bowl team. All 4 computer models have North Texas as the worst team playing in a bowl, edging out 6-7 Hawaii and miles from anybody else. Regardless of method, all agree that the Mean Green are on the order of two touchdowns WORSE than and AVERAGE FBS team. And Army is about an average FBS team. Again I wonder if bettors are giving UNT a home-field boost playing a county away from home. Sun: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Stanford 9-3 6.68 9.14 84.15 14.40 3.41 North Carolina 8-4 3.52 4.99 78.74 14.10 1.93 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI Stanford 3.17 Stanford 4.14 Stanford 3.65 Stanford 3.5 Stanford 5.41 Stanford 0.3 Everyone likes Stanford in the bowl that gives a warm feeling in the heart of any TCU fan over the age of 40. Sagarin likes the Trees the most, FPI the least. Only 5 points separate any of the predictions. Independence: Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS N.C. State 6-6 5.44 9.42 74.72 7.40 4.80 Vanderbilt 6-6 -2.18 -0.62 72.15 5.70 2.69 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav DUSHEE Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI N.C. State 7.62 N.C. State 10.03 N.C. State 8.82 N.C. State 4 N.C. State 2.57 N.C. State 1.7 Yes, I know that this game is neither in Texas nor includes a Texas team, but it is right across the border. It involves two mediocre teams from good conferences and everyone agrees that Philip Rivers' alma mater is slightly less mediocre than the Fightin' Robber Barons of Nashville. This a game where DUSHEE likes a team far more than the others. All the Others All the rest of the that I haven't discussed to this point are captured in the table below. DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav D Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI New Mexico Albuquerque, NM New Mexico -4.05 New Mexico -4.07 New Mexico -4.06 New Mexico -7 New Mexico -5.40 New Mexico -6.4 Camelia Montgomery, AL Toledo -4.81 Toledo -7.25 Toledo -6.03 Appalachian State 1 Toledo -0.52 Toledo -0.5 Cure Orlando, FL UCF 2.05 UCF 6.12 UCF 4.09 UCF 6 UCF 4.64 UCF 4.6 New Orleans New Oleans, LA Southern Miss 6.38 Southern Miss 8.16 Southern Miss 7.27 Southern Miss 3.5 LA Lafayette -1.15 Southern Miss 4.6 Miami Beach Miami, FL Tulsa -12.79 Tulsa -14.39 Tulsa -13.59 Tulsa -11.5 Tulsa -19.98 Tulsa -9.2 Boca Raton Boca Raton, FL West. Kentucky 11.38 West. Kentucky 10.71 West. Kentucky 11.05 West. Kentucky 4.5 West. Kentucky 1.03 West. Kentucky 3.9 Poinsettia San Diego, Ca BYU 4.83 BYU 3.80 BYU 4.31 BYU 9 BYU 11.68 BYU 13.2 Potato Boise, ID Colorado St. -12.59 Colorado St. -17.19 Colorado St. -14.89 Colorado St. -13.5 Colorado St. -10.48 Colorado St. -9.2 Bahamas Nassau, BA Old Dominion -6.41 Old Dominion -2.31 Old Dominion -4.36 Old Dominion -4 Old Dominion -6.65 Old Dominion -5.4 Dollar General Mobile, AL Troy 9.11 Troy 10.11 Troy 9.61 Troy 3.5 Troy 3.11 Troy 5.3 Hawai'i Honolulu, HI Middle Tenn. St. -10.04 Middle Tenn. St. -8.13 Middle Tenn. St. -9.09 Middle Tenn. St. -2.28 Middle Tenn. St. -9.7 St. Petersburg St. Petersburg, FL Mississippi St. 4.60 Mississippi St. 11.44 Mississippi St. 8.02 Mississippi St. 13 Mississippi St. 13.41 Mississippi St. 16.0 Quick Lane Detroit, MI Maryland 2.32 Maryland 2.72 Maryland 2.52 Maryland 1 Maryland 1.63 Maryland 0.2 Military Annapolis, MD Temple 21.26 Temple 19.57 Temple 20.42 Temple 13 Temple 15.81 Temple 8.8 Holiday San Diego, Ca Washington St. -16.00 Washington St. -18.64 Washington St. -17.32 Washington St. -6.5 Washington St. -6.45 Washington St. -8.7 Pinstripe New York, NY Northwestern -0.68 Northwestern -1.44 Northwestern -1.06 Pittsburgh 5.5 Pittsburgh 3.43 Pittsburgh 5.3 Foster Farms Santa Clara, CA Utah -3.20 Utah -4.60 Utah -3.90 Utah -8 Utah -9.32 Utah -9.8 Birmingham Birmingham, AL South Florida -18.35 South Florida -17.60 South Florida -17.98 South Florida -10.5 South Florida -15.02 South Florida -10.1 Belk Charlotte, NC Virginia Tech -11.39 Virginia Tech -7.61 Virginia Tech -9.50 Virginia Tech -7 Virginia Tech -6.78 Virginia Tech -6.6 Music City Nashville, TN Tennessee -0.49 Tennessee -2.16 Tennessee -1.32 Tennessee -3 Nebraska 0.76 Tennessee -7.2 Arizona Tucson, AZ Air Force 11.83 Air Force 13.75 Air Force 12.79 Air Force 13.5 Air Force 15.13 Air Force 12.4 Citrus Orlando, FL Louisville 5.67 Louisville 0.43 Louisville 3.05 LSU -3.5 LSU -2.57 Louisville 0.6 TaxSlayer Jacksonville, FL Georgia Tech 0.46 Kentucky -2.04 Kentucky -0.79 Georgia Tech 3.5 Georgia Tech 6.70 Georgia Tech 3.8 A few notes on these games: 1) I'm not sure why, but there is no Vegas line for the Middle Tennessee - Hawaii game. 2) There are a few games where DUSHEE is in noticeable disagreement with the other predictors/models. DUSHEE likes Toledo in the Camellia, Western Kentucky in the Boca Raton, Troy in the Dollar General (new candidate for top-5 worst Bowl Sponsor Names), and Washington State in the Holiday a lot more than the others. DUSHEE likes Northwestern in the Pinstripe when the others all have Pitt as a 3.5-point or greater favorite. Revised DUSHEE is the only model that likes Kentucky over Georgia Tech. And DUSHEE is significantly less favorable toward Utah against Indiana than the others. Northwestern and Western Kentucky were arguably the biggest DUSHEE WTF teams of the year so it is not surprising that DUSHEE favors them more than the others. DUSHEE has also been noticeably undersold on Pitt this season. 3) DUSHEE does not encourage gambling, but if one were inclined to make wagers based on the advice of DUSHEE, he would steer you toward Washington State (-6.5) against Minnesota in the Holiday, Michigan (-6.5) against Florida State in the Orange, Colorado (-3) against Oklahoma State in the Alamo, South Florida (-10.5) against South Carolina in the Birmingham, and Toledo (+1) against Appalachian State in the Camellia. 4) DUSHEE's highest confidence picks are Temple, South Florida, Washington State, Michigan and Alabama. Lowest confidence picks are USC, Kentucky, Northwestern, Navy, and Tennessee. So there you have it everybody. After the bowls are over, we'll come back to this and see how DUSHEE fared. Two seasons ago, DUSHEE did pretty well. Last year, I petered out before bowl season and never kept track. Correction: Where's the Outback Bowl, mate? As Newbomb so astutely pointed out, I totally missed the Outback Bowl between Florida and Iowa. And it turns out, the numbers for this game are notable. Team Record DO DR Sag FPI SoS Florida 8-4 6.59 7.58 79.58 12.60 1.96 Iowa 8-4 6.77 7.58 84.01 12.60 1.30 DO Fav DDO DR Fav DDR DA Fav D Avg Vegas Fav Vegas Sag Fav DSag FPI Fav DFPI Iowa -0.18 Iowa 0.00 Iowa -0.09 Florida 2.5 Iowa -4.43 Even 0.0 DUSHEE Original, DUSHEE Revised, and FPI all could not have this game more even. You have to go out to the FIFTH decimal place in Revised DUSHEE to give Iowa the edge. The FPI listing only goes to one decimal place. Sagarin likes Iowa by 4.5, Vegas likes Florida by 2.5. This game couldn't be more of a coin flip and becomes the new lowest DUSHEE confidence pick. Which of course probably means that it will be a blowout.
  31. 2 points
    Whither the 2016 Frogs? Bruce Banner and the Hulk. Yin and yang. Tyler Durden and the unnamed Edward Norton character in Fight Club. Devil with the Blue Dress. Sméagol and Gollum. The 2016 Frogs. Pop culture is replete with dichotomous but symbiotic opposites contained in the same body. For there to be beauty there must be ugliness. Good cannot exist without evil. There was some beauty to this edition of the Frogs. That fabulous 40-point beatdown of the drain-encircling Rapey-bears. The Charlie Strong swan song (La cucuracha, ya no puede caminar ...). A 30-point beating of an SMU team who may not have been as dreadful as they appeared at the time (ask Houston). But the evil Frogs appeared just as often. Kansas. West Virginia. Oklahoma State. And then there were the games when the Good and Evil Frogs battled for dominance within the same game, sometimes quarter-to-quarter. Arkansas -- Evil Frogs in the first half, beautiful Frogs in the second. Oklahoma -- Dr. Jekyll in the first and fourth, Mr. Hyde in the second and third. For the first 5 weeks of the season, save for the inevitable Kenny Hill pick-6, the offense looked unstoppable while the defense looked atrocious. Then, from weeks 6 through 9, the formerly unstoppable offense became totally inept while the defense started getting better. Then for the last 4 weeks, the offense and defense joined forces, either showing Peach Bowl-level dominance or 1997-level ineptitude, but in unison and in alternating weeks. Blow out Baylor. Blown out by Okie State. Blow out Texas. Blown out by Kansas State. And then there was "home field advantage." The Frogs were uncategorically awful at "The Carter." The Frogs averaged a point differential of nearly a +10 points on the road this year. They averaged a point differential of -4 points at home. That means the Frogs were 4 points worse than an average FBS team at home and 10 points better than an average FBS team on the road. On average, FBS teams were 3.2 points better at home than on the road. Twenty-nine teams (out of 128) had worse point differentials at home than on the road. Only Army (-22) had a bigger home-road disparity than the Frogs. A look at the Frog's numbers week-to-week shows just how inscrutable the Frogs were this season: Opp Ark ISU @ SMU OU @ Kan @ WVU Ttech @ Bay OkSt @ Tex KSU PD -7.40 19.20 21.20 9.82 -24.30 -17.10 -8.30 44.60 -20.20 24.45 -17.50 YD 172.40 107.00 243.50 107.09 -265.70 -28.70 81.20 365.00 -194.90 134.18 -252.60 Score 3.44 18.00 25.96 11.75 -29.11 -12.79 -1.59 47.46 -22.93 22.82 -23.94 Up until week 6, this team had the look of a pretty solid team. They lost a game to Arkansas they had no business losing, beating the Hogs physically but combining a slow start, shaky kicking, and insurmountable turnovers into a painful loss stew. They dominated two teams they were supposed to dominate, Iowa State and SMU, and then played a top-10 Oklahoma team to an almost draw. Then there was Kansas. Effing Kansas. Every. Damn. Year. Kansas. By DUSHEE metrics, the Kansas game was the Frogs worst performance of the year. It was last year as well. And the year before. All of them wins, mind you. But awful, terrible, no good performances against awful, terrible, no good teams. And from that point on, the Frogs were usually a below-average team. Except for Baylor and Texas, when they looked like a legitimate top-25 team. Looking at the standard deviation (a measure of inconsistency in this case) in point differential, the Frogs were the 12th most inconsistent team in FBS this season (Army, being the most inconsistent) with a standard deviation of 22.7 points. That means the Frogs, who had an average point differential of 2.2 points/game, were just as likely to be 25 points better than an average team on a given afternoon (as they were against Texas) as they were to be 20 points worse than an average team (as they were against Oklahoma State). Such were the 2016 Frogs. Wither the "Big" XII-II? It was a bad year for the conference as well. I want to dig into conference strength more after the Army-Navy game Saturday officially closes out the regular season, but as a preview DUSHEE had the Big XII-II about as close, on average, to the American Athletic Conference as the PAC-12, the next lowest "Power 5" conference: Conference Average DUSHEE Scores SEC 5.39 ACC 4.35 B10 4.21 P12 4.08 B12 2.30 AAC 0.79 MWC -3.82 MAC -4.19 CUSA -8.38 SBC -8.55 The bulk of the conference was really, really, middling, with only Oklahoma and West Virginia averaging a touchdown or greater better than an average team. Oklahoma State, Kansas State, and TCU were between a field goal and touchdown better than an average team; Texas and Baylor were definitively average. Here are the conference numbers: Rk Team PD YD Score (Orig) 8 Oklahoma 18.17 146.45 19.23 24 West Virginia 9.68 74.16 10.05 34 Oklahoma St. 7.75 31.94 6.72 45 Kansas St. 8.26 -12.39 4.90 49 TCU 2.22 42.59 3.55 52 Texas 0.04 51.32 2.52 54 Baylor -0.97 52.61 1.91 73 Iowa St. -2.89 -23.98 -3.09 74 Texas Tech -3.51 -18.69 -3.25 121 Kansas -20.46 -121.27 -19.53 The Revised DUSHEE score emphasizes strength-of-schedule and de-emphasizes performances that are far outside the norm for a particular team; but since a team's strength of schedule is dominated by the conference it is in (e.g., 82% of TCU's SoS was based on its 9 conference opponents of 11 FBS games), the conference's Revised DUSHEE rankings don't look a lot different than the Originals: 8 Oklahoma 20.80 148.08 22.40 23 West Virginia 10.81 72.78 11.41 33 Oklahoma St. 9.30 28.00 7.81 44 TCU 2.88 54.12 5.04 48 Kansas St. 8.09 -12.21 4.69 52 Texas 0.74 51.00 3.44 53 Baylor -0.98 64.48 3.06 66 Texas Tech 0.59 -12.74 -0.34 75 Iowa St. -2.94 -37.87 -4.15 112 Kansas -16.10 -120.33 -17.67 I would caution not to put too much emphasis on the conference's weakness this season. It was a down year. The last two seasons, the Big XII-II were either second or third in the average ratings. Three years ago, many were having a wake for the B1G as a relevant conference outside of Ohio State. Now, people are clamoring for as many as three B1G teams in the CFP. These things are transient, and a small conference like the Big 12 are harder hit by bad years from top teams (ahem, TCU and Baylor). Whither Georgia? I also intend to put out a blog on the Bowl season but since we're emphasizing the Frogs, let's take a look at their Liberty Bowl opponent, Georgia. On an average basis, the Dawgs look about the same as the Frogs. But on a week-to-week basis, Georgia was less Jekyll/Hyde and more consistently meh. Opp UNC Mizz Miss Tenn SoCar Vandy Fla Ky Aub ULaLa GaTech PD 14.00 -6.90 -38.30 -0.40 7.40 -1.80 -9.27 -0.50 21.10 13.10 -0.20 YD 194.67 -100.10 -132.30 -13.60 -66.70 203.90 -26.27 140.90 271.10 -79.20 -25.60 Score (Orig) 18.79 -9.46 -31.96 -0.93 1.69 8.70 -7.46 6.51 27.23 4.89 -1.38 Score (Revised) 21.40 -13.57 -25.54 1.70 -6.36 7.57 -3.18 7.05 36.52 0.00 -1.60 Georgia had two good performances; in week 1 against UNC (33-24, outgaining 474-315) and in their week 11 upset of Auburn (13-7, outgaining 343-164). Georgia's two worst performances were back-to-back in weeks 3-4 against a weak Missouri team (28-27, outgained 409-473) and Ole Miss (14-45, outgained 396-510). Their other 7 games, they were really, consistently average. Based on average DUSHEE score, the Frogs are a 2.5-point favorite over Georgia, but while we've seen a lot of the "average" Georgia team, we've seen very little of the "average" TCU team. If the "good" TCU team shows, the line should probably be closer to 2-3 TDs. If the "evil" TCU team shows, Georgia should be favored by 2-3 TDs. I guess we'll just have to tune in and find out which side of the coin lands face up.
  32. 2 points
    It was while I was recovering from a broken leg I had the bright idea of riding in a cattle roundup. A few weeks earlier I was installing a light fixture for my mother-in-law and literally fell victim to a cheap wooden Walmart stepladder. My foot slipped forward on the bottom rung and I fell backwards into the kitchen floor. I thought it was a bad sprain, and I limped around the rest of the afternoon and evening, but the next morning there was more swelling and unabated pain, so I went to the ER to have it checked. "Tibial plateau fracture" was the diagnosis and I was in surgery before lunch. A six-day hospital stay and $22,000 later I was wheelchaired through TSA and three airports to get back home with an immobilized, fully extended left leg. As soon as the local traumatologist would permit I began physical therapy. It sort of reminded me of my freshman year at TCU on Elmer Brown's student trainer staff, except this time I was the guy hurting when my leg was flexed more than five degrees. And that's when I decided to sign on for the cattle drive. It became a combination goal and reward, a measurable desired outcome: able to spend all day in the saddle by mid-March. I worked and sweated and hurt and came to appreciate Oxycodone almost as much as morphine. I was driven to be saddle- ready, and whenever the pain was at its worst I focused on riding again. A week before I was to fly to Texas the traumatologist said "you're good to go." My physical therapist said I wasn't. But MD trumps RPT so I flew to Midland- Odessa and drove to Presidio in a rented car. The next morning I was introduced to Rojo, a dark bay gelding, my mount for the roundup. The first day we gathered the longhorn cattle from their winter pasture, from the rocky hillsides and patches of prickly pear and honey mesquites. There were some veteran cow-critters with horns an impressive five feet tip-to-tip, some younger bulls and heifers, and of course a few unbranded calves. We herded them all to a holding pen where we ate supper and I crawled into a hot roll on the ground for the night. The following day we moved the herd to the branding pens at the main ranch house. Youngsters were vaccinated, tagged and branded, and when they were released and went bawling back to mama we noted who belonged to whom. I mugged and branded longhorn calves, the leg was holding up fine. On the third day we moved the cattle to their summer pasture. There was a caliche road running through the ranch and the old stock--they'd been through this a few times before--stuck to the road. But the younger animals, feeling adventurous I guess, they tended to wander away from the main herd. I'd begun the morning riding drag on Rojo, the place with the most dust and the worst view. So when I saw two or three yearlings head off to the right I turned Rojo off the road, kicked him in the sides a couple of times to convince him, yes, we ARE going through the brush again, and took off in pursuit. We caught and turned them back in toward the herd, but to keep them from running off again Rojo and I now rode flank, through the brush and occasional dry creek beds. Now Rojo's background was mainly as a trail horse, and he didn't especially like where I took him. I had to keep him away from the road where he wanted to be with his cayuse friends. Eventually, though, the reality sunk into his little walnut brain that I was serous and we actually made a pretty good couple of hands. I mentioned the dry creek beds. Those were the things Rojo hated most. He'd slide on his hocks down one bank, then pick up speed to climb up the other. We crossed three, Rojo straining and sweating but doing an altogether good job of it. And then we came to the fourth creek bed. I was relaxed in the saddle, admiring the view and counting my blessings when we came to the next creek bed, and I felt Rojo's muscles tighten under me. In one brief moment of cowhand clairvoyance I knew what was going to happen next. I knew Rojo was not going to slide down one side and scramble up the other. Rojo was going to jump that creek bed. In an instant we were airborne, Rojo's hindquarters launching us up and forward, his forelegs landing us gracefully, safely on the other side. I had no time to think before it was all over. I reckon I surprised Rojo as well as myself when I hollered, "Yeehaw, Rojo, let's do that again!" It was the shortest flight I've ever taken. Also one of the best, the one I'll remember for always. I looked around, and evidently no one had seen the feat. It was our secret, Rojo's and mine, a secret shared between a pretty good cow pony and an old cowboy with a busted leg.
  33. 2 points
    Norman Lear almost killed TV in the 1970s. Oh, sure, he, Bud Yorkin and a few of their pals revolutionized the medium, and most of what they made was absolutely brilliant: All in the Family, The Jeffersons, Maude, Good Times and One Day at a Time, to name a prominent few. In the dying days of the Vietnam conflict and during the collective shame of Watergate, America craved yelling, screaming and fighting on television. (And maybe we still do in troubled times; look at the reality-TV boom of the early 2000s and all the events that occurred in that era. Apparently escapism isn't all it's cracked up to be and never has been.) The brilliance of Lear's creations was that, although the "liberal" side almost always won in his programs' episodes, viewers of all political and social stripes had somebody to embrace. Archie Bunker, most prominently by far, was supposed to be an easy-to-hate, ready-made bigot always comically set up for a fall by his own backward thinking or that of his goofy friends, or by his daughter and cultured son-in-law (and even sometimes by his sweet wife). Maude herself gave Archie fits in the early years of the series, as did George Jefferson and Irene Lorenzo. Pretty much all of Lear's subsequent creations (the successful ones, anyway) emerged like smoke from Archie's cigar. Archie Bunker was pater familias of the most dysfunctional extended TV family of all time. But a funny thing happened on the way to Archie becoming a villain. He became a hero. So many Americans loved him so much--warts, humiliations, bald-faced bigotry and all--that the show's producers eventually had to make the show all about him. The liberals faded, slowly, as did most of Archie's nemeses. Gloria disappeared. Meathead disappeared. Maude got her own show fairly early on. The Jeffersons got one even earlier. Even Edith, beloved wife, got killed off when Jean Stapleton quit the show. But Archie soldiered on, eventually half-spinning off into a show that really was all about him, Archie Bunker's Place. It ran into the Reagan administration, which surely would have pleased a real Archie Bunker. Archie possessed the same charm that Howard Stern used to rule the airwaves for a decade or two and that Donald Trump is using now to try to ascend to the highest office in the land. He said what he felt when he felt like saying it, and he didn't care who heard or what other people thought. Americans love a loudmouth, almost no matter what he (or she) says, and let's face it: Archie was lovable! And hilarious! And not always wrong! Mostly, that was because Carroll O'Connor gave the character more wrinkles than Abe Vigoda has on his whole body (if, indeed, Mr. Vigoda is still alive, and I think he is). But it was also because Archie said what a lot of Americans were thinking at the time, and the funny part is that history has proven him right on at least a few occasions. At the end of the Jimmy Carter election episode in 1976, maybe 1977, Archie barked to Meathead, "You're getting Reagan in '80!" And on another famous episode, Archie's televised proposal to arm every passenger on an airplane with a pistol in order to prevent hijackings foreshadowed the era of air marshals post-September 11. But back to Norman Lear almost killing television. In a nutshell, it all got to be too much. All in the Family's ratings started to slip, just a little bit, in 1976 and fell from there. Maude suffered a similar fate. George and Weezy lasted into the mid-'80s but with a vastly changed set of messages. They basically went from serious to silly. George ended up doing the unthinkable and palling around with Tom Wills! One Day at a Time also softened considerably, eliminating the contentious divorced-father character and turning Schneider, the famous building super, from a somewhat lecherous dude always wanting to boink Ms. Romano into a protector of the single mother and her girls (or girl, of course, after poor McKenzie Phillips went off the rails and took Julie Cooper with her). Good Times should have ended when John Amos left the cast. In any case, fighting got old. Yelling and screaming got old. Politics got old. No other entity can overdo a good thing and pound it mercilessly into the ground the way American television can. That's what was happening in the late '70s. The outlook was bleak. The Lear formula was boring, but networks kept trying it. And then somebody at ABC came to his (or her) senses. What you're about to see is powerful. It's borderline mind-blowing. This is how ABC responded to CBS and Norman Lear's hegemony on television. Stripping away all pretension, ABC went old school. It brought back stand-up-style comedy, sort of (Welcome Back, Kotter). It brought in an alien for more, and more bizarre, stand-up stuff (Mork and Mindy, of course). It brought back hot chicks, sexual tension and broad physical comedy (Three's Company). It brought something of a yeller-screamer show to the fore, but it made the conflicts personal, not political, and it gave multiple characters enviable depth, not just one or two (Taxi). And it brought back the '50s (Happy Days and Laverne and Shirley)! When in doubt, bring back the '50s. Nothing bad ever happened in the '50s, right, Archie Bunker? Now, ABC's revolution didn't start in 1978. It had been going for a few years, and by the time the long-form trailer below hit advertising agencies, ABC had become the No. 1 network on television, mainly by killing off Archie Bunker with Mork, the Fonz and Suzanne Summers. Behold: Now, let's take these gems one by one. Welcome Back, Kotter: It didn't have long to run, as Vinny Barbarino would soon be on his way out and Beau de la Barre on his way in, but Welcome Back, Kotter managed to capture inner-city pathos without pounding us over the head with it. There were two white guys, a black guy and a Puerto Rican Jew serving as the main characters on this show, along with a Jew-fro'ed, mustachioed, wise-cracking teacher who himself had been a Sweathog a scant decade or so before taking over in the classroom. We didn't ask why guys from diverse racial backgrounds were friends. (Norman Lear would have hammered that angle.) All we knew was that they were scamps, mostly low-level troublemakers who wouldn't so much as be called down in the classroom in today's era of school violence. And they loved the one guy they could relate to, the one guy who got them, who had been one of them in a not-so-distant former life. This is probably one of the better shows about teaching and classrooms ever made (Head of the Class also comes to mind) in part because it mostly deals with the everyday, fairly mundane problems that seem so magnified and earth-shattering in high school. There's really not much in the way of hard drug use, alcoholism, teenage sex or domestic violence on Kotter. (Again, Norman Lear would have had a field day with that stuff.) The guys worry about girls, sports, their hair, whatever. Kotter just wants to keep them out of trouble--not life-changing trouble, necessarily, just school trouble. This show teaches without preaching. That's why it worked in the let-up era of the late '70s. Operation Petticoat: This one doesn't jog the memory for me, but it looks sufficiently slapstick to fit into the lineup. Hey, not every hit is a home run. Taxi: This must have been Taxi's first season. (I did no research for this entry.) This show is criminally underrated (yes, really) and merits a long blog entry of its own. What made it appealing was an amazing cast and characters that people cared about because they seemed like people, not like the political caricatures Norman Lear (skillfully) drew. Sure, there was conflict, but there was also resolution (most of the time, anyway) and the strong feeling that these people could, and maybe did, actually exist. And seriously, that cast: Judd Hirsch, Danny Devito, Marilu Henner, Tony Danza (yeah, OK, but he had a pretty good career after Taxi), Jeff Conaway, Christopher Lloyd (Back to the Future!) and, for heaven's sake, the unbelievable, inimitable, completely mold-breaking Andy Kaufman. And Carol Kane as his wife! Other than the cars and the telephones, this show holds up well today. It has a timelessness that the Archie Bunker family tree mostly doesn't have. That's not to say that Norman Lear's creations weren't great. They were. They just weren't set up to be relevant 40 years after they aired. Happy Days: The show that ended up originating the phrase "jump the shark" (which now dates to the late '90s, ouch!) hadn't quite done it yet in 1978. It was still goofy Richie and his pals, cool Fonz (how was he ever cool? ... that's another blog entry) and the straight-laced Cunninghams. Smooth and easy. Satisfying. Nostalgic for the middle-aged folks and yet entertaining enough for the kids. This show was emblematic of the ABC revolution and led the way. It didn't need to be brilliant. It just needed to be fun, and it was ... until Chachi came along. Laverne & Shirley: Happy Days with girls! And more laughs! And more goofiness! And Carmine "the big Ragu" Ragusa, the world's first dancing tough guy! And one of the great theme songs of all time! After half a decade of strife, yeah, people were ready for this. And it was great ... until they moved to California. Three's Company: Based on a British show (as so much of our television is, check out Til Death Us Do Part sometime) called Man about the House, this show became emblematic of mindless drivel on television and was probably the most prominent antidote of all to Norman Lear's seriousness. But you know what? Three's Company was funny. John Ritter was a brilliant physical comedian. The writing was vaudevillian in the best possible way. The setting, Southern California in the '70s, could not have been more enticing. And there were blondes, so many blondes, blondes with big hair and short shorts and halter tops. And there were the Ropers, and after the Ropers came Mr. Furley, who was actually funnier than the Ropers! As a kid, I wanted to live in Three's Company, just in the same neighborhood as Jack, Janet and Chrissy/can't remember the middle one's name/Terri. This show is still great today because innuendo, mild situational irony and a horny straight dude having to pretend to be gay will never get old. By the way, that gay thing ... Ridiculous as it might have been on this show, homosexuality was something Norman Lear never really, really breached in his a career, at least not prominently. Just saying. Starsky & Hutch: Overrated. Sorry, but it was. Great cars, cool clothes, but it got repetitive. But crime dramas get that way. Sacrilege, I know, but I don't care. Definitely cool at the time, though, and yes, I still have the toy car. Vegas: This, however, was great. Robert Urich is underrated historically. I never figured out, though, why he parked his car right in his house, or apartment, or whatever it was. Didn't the engine make the place hot? Didn't the car smell? Whatever, awesome show. Dan Tanna. Seriously. Charlie's Angels: Its best days were past it (Farah Fawcett returns to guest star ... ugh), but three beautiful women fighting crime for some guy we never see? Again, after Maude, America needed this. America wanted this, no matter how much Maude would have hated it. (Or would she have? It was all about female empowerment, after all.) Eight is Enough: TCU's own Betty Buckley! Eventually! This show was the serious Brady Bunch, but it worked because Dick Van Patten was strangely likable and Adam Rich was just cute enough. Again, ABC went with family here, but it was a family that fought over personal things, not over politics (mostly). These seemed like real people until one of the girls married a pitcher for the Dodgers. Mork and Mindy: Oh, wow. What is there to say? Robin Williams. An adorable Pam Dawber. Later, Jonathan Winters! A settling in Boulder that was brilliant, in that Mork could hide pretty effectively in a midsize college town that was half full of stoners, anyway. This was one long Robin Williams stand-up show, complete with his constant message of peace and kindness, with the occasional friendly chiding or shocked reaction from Mindy. And for a while, it worked. Spectacularly well. But it's hard to carry such a goofy set-up on for very long. Eventually, Mork starts figuring out Earth. He starts figuring out Mindy. He settles in. Then what? Then it's over. But what a sensation this show was, and what a brilliant and funny departure it was from the Archie Bunker family of shows. Mork was an alien right in the heart of the Star Wars era, when science fiction was huge. But he wasn't scary. He was Robin Williams, RIP and thanks. It's hard to watch this one now, but the appeal is still fresh. And remember, this was actually a Happy Days spin-off. The Fonz had a family of his own. What's Happening!!: Is it racist for me to say that this is very likely the best black sitcom in the history of television? Yes, really! Why was it so great? First of all, it was funny. Always funny. The characters were endearing. The scripts were memorable. (Dwayne bet on the football team that had the helmet he liked best. Tampa over Oakland? Oh, no!) There was plenty of charm to go around, from Shirley at the diner to Mama to Dee to Rerun and Dwayne to Roj, arguably television's first black nerd. But what really worked on this show was that it was about people--black people, but that didn't matter. After getting lecture after lecture from Norman Lear about race (some of them necessary, of course), here we had a program that featured black characters with no soapboxes. They were just funny characters. And the theme song was awesome. Another criminally underrated show. Barney Miller: Just as teachers talk about Kotter as the best classroom show ever made, cops talk about Barney Miller as the best cop show ever. Well, at least those old enough to remember it do, or used to. TV has tried so hard over the decades to come up with something both entertaining and authentic to depict the lives of police officers, but until the actual show Cops debuted, nothing had come as close as Barney Miller to nailing the scene. Sure, the cops on Barney Miller were detectives, not street cops (except for poor Levitt, of course), but their daily routine of filling out paperwork, drinking terrible coffee and dealing with fringe-ish types in Greenwich Village was much more accurate a portrait of cop life than the car-chase and gun-battle action shows that both preceded and followed the sitcom classic. Or so I've read, or been told ... or maybe I just want that to be true. In any case, here was another show that mixed characters seamlessly and didn't bother to talk much about the fact that there were white, black, Puerto Rican and Asian characters sharing the same small space. (Again, this was extremely post-racial stuff compared to All in the Family or The Jeffersons.) Even Linda Lavin had a turn as a female detective in the show's early years. Barney Miller was elite television, despite, or maybe even because of, numerous cast changes. It's still one of the best and most entertaining shows on TV, a cut well above most of what the medium has cranked out over the years. Soap: It wasn't Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman or Fernwood 2 Night, although the idea was similar, if not pretty much the same. Still, this show, which actually looked a bit like a Norman Lear comedy (remember, it spawned Benson), became a farcical '70s classic. Despite the always corrosive presence of Billy Crystal, Soap was a rollicking riot of a show that captured the Carter-era malaise by making every character on the show pretty much completely indifferent to every other character. This program took the feelings and anger of Lear's work and turned them into farce and complete stupidity--with hilarious results! Of course, it would never work today because the programs it parodied, soap operas, are basically dead, and realty TV has swallowed the last bit of potential irony on television. Family: To my somewhat limited memory, this show was Eight is Enough with fewer kids and with a budding star named Kristy McNichol, who pretty much disappeared after the show's run, save maybe for a few after-school-special-type programs. She did some damage on Battle of the Network Stars, though, another brilliant ABC creation (starring Howard Cosell and Bruce Jenner!). Donny & Marie: Mormon disco! This was the oldest of old-school crap. Whatever. People liked it ... for a while. It was definitely mindless, and that was appealing for the era. Apple Pie: One bad Apple didn't spoil the whole bunch for ABC, but this show only lasted eight episodes. I'd never actually heard of it until I saw the promo video. Sitcoms with historical settings only last if they're set in the '50s (including M*A*S*H). This was was from the '30s. Why? Still ... Dabney Coleman! Carter Country: Unquestionably the best mostly forgotten sitcom of all time, this show was about black and white cops in the South (Carter Country, as in Jimmy) but still managed to be mostly silly, with Roy, the gruff police chief; Kene Holliday's savvy cop character; and the Mayor, who coined the catchphrase, "Handle it, Roy! Handle it! Handle it!" goofing around in a small-town Georgia police station. This was a sillier version of Barney Miller that lacked Barney's gravitas but nevertheless turned out to be pretty entertaining. And again, we're mainly in post-Lear racial territory here, with everybody getting along for the most part and their relationships requiring no real explanation. Carter Country was an absolute delight and was as late-'70s as Sam Houston was Texan. It's a gem to see these days if it pops up on one of the nostalgia channels. Why this show didn't get a more legendary treatment remains a mystery. The Love Boat: Oh, wow. Oh, wow oh wow. I'm not saying that I named my first born after Isaac the bartender, but I'm not saying I didn't. Because I kind of did, kind of. This is a cultural touchstone if there ever was one. Basically a reference point for cheesy television, The Love Boat nevertheless ran for a very long time and roped in every guest star imaginable from mid-'70s and early '80s television. What an absolute tour de force of sappy, goofball television this was. Needed a break from Norman Lear's preachy creations? Oh, America, you got it. I mean you really got it. Fantasy Island: This show was awful, awful, awful. Diabolically acted, amateurishly cast, drippily dramatic and borderline scary, it's hard to believe that it's still pretty much the defining role of Ricardo Montalban's career. Still, again, it was a break from what the first half of the decade had brought to television. The unintentional comedy on this show was rampant, though, something I've mainly discovered watching the program in recent years on nostalgia TV. How did TV execs of the era green light this stuff? And how did it stay so popular for so long? Was Tatu really that cute? (By the way, Herve Villechaise, who was from Paris, had normal-sized organs in that tiny body and lived every day in excruciating pain. Which is sad. But apparently his not-dwarfy genitals were popular with the ladies. Really! Aren't you glad you read this far? I know. Nobody did.) The Hardy Boys: I vaguely remember this show, but what I don't remember about it was it being the gayest show ever. NTTAWWT, of course. But still. Wow, so gay. I actually feel some sense of retro happiness for all the poor, closeted gentlemen who, at least, got to get excited about seeing this show on Saturday nights, even if they couldn't express their true selves in the open in 1978. Good for you, guys, really. Somehow, Parker Stevenson and Shaun Cassidy (IMDB profile photo from 1978, no joke) are still working, Cassidy as a pretty big-time producer. There's no business like it. (OK, so I did a tiny bit of research. IMDB is a day killer.) Movies: Taxi Driver on network TV? How? I'm pretty sure I saw The Bad News Bears on ABC in 1978, deleted bad words and all. And Battlestar Galactica, wow, what a great show and franchise that was. World class, and I'm not even a sci-fi guy, normally. And then there's a musical number at the end of the video! (Remember the video? That's what all of this was supposed to be about.) Mr. Cunningham, Isaac, Shirley, Barney Miller ... they're all there, grooving to a mild disco beat. I've seen better promo dance numbers (much better), but it's charming nonetheless. And that voice of ABC was the best TV voice ever. Norman Lear was a genius, a revolutionary and quite possibly the most important person in the history of scripted American television. But when enough was enough, ABC came through with a lineup so powerful that its awesomeness and grandeur still resonate today. And most of all, it was fun. It defined the greatest era in human history, the late '70s. And it kept the beautiful medium, television, from eating itself. We owe much to Mork, the Fonz, Wojo, Alex Reger, Roj and even the Mayor from Carter Country. Long may their legacy endure.
  34. 2 points
    Today, Nov.11, is Veterans Day. And we are urged to -- and we do -- remember and respect our fellow citizens who served the nation in our armed forces. But I am old enough to remember when Nov. 11 was Armistice Day. It was so remembered by my parents' and grandparents' generations. It marked the day in 1918 that an armistice (not a formal surrender as in 1945) effectively ended the fighting in World War I (known until the 1940s as The Great War). We need to keep that in mind. These days there are dwindling numbers (less than a million certainly) of the 7-plus million Americans who were in uniform in World War II. Even my generation -- the kids who followed the war on the home front -- is slowly passing. And we all need to understand that because of the politicians' mistakes in 1918-1920 in the wake of that first war the world had to suffer the second war. In a way it was one war -- one really great war -- with a 21-year intermission. The 20th Century was as much a horrible war experience as any century in history. More people killed. More of those killed civilians rather than soldiers or sailors. The so-called peace we enjoyed (if you can call it that) since 1945 might have been much worse, but the mistakes made in the ending of World War II were less awful than the mistakes of 1919. For all its warts, the United Nations has served a purpose in helping prevent another -- and worse, to be sure -- war between major powers, which nowadays means nuclear powers. Democracy, which we in our arrogance credit with being more peaceful than other systems, has not exactly flourished over the last 70 years, but it has survived because we learned that democratic systems need preparedness in order to survive. Teddy Roosevelt's Big Stick does have a use. In that way we have seen a success. Nuclear fear has played a part, but so has the way that the defeated nations of World War II (Germany and Japan, mostly) learned and rebounded in contrast to the way that Germany's 1918 defeat led directly to Hitler and World War II. Even Russia may have learned something. Maybe even America. To the degree that this last 70 years is a success we can be thankful. And maybe this is as good a day as any on the calendar to reflect that WWI led to WWII and that somehow we have managed to avoid further continuation of world war even in a world that always has a war going someplace. That is perhaps a larger blessing than we realize.
  35. 2 points
    I will briefly brief you on some of my pet peeves. My dudgeon is up (I am mad) at the moment because some 24-year-old third stringer on Channel 5 just did a feature on ``Pharr-ington" (rather than Fare-ington, as it is properly pronounced) Field, which (he tells us in an astounded manner) was used for high school games in Fort Worth back in the 1940s!!! I expected him to say that Lt. 2ipley Arnold played in the first game at Farrington. I freely admit that I have a jaundiced view of this sort of thing because (1) I am approaching 80 years old, (2) I thus got my education back when stuff like history was actually taught in U.S. schools and (3) I have been alert to many things (admittedly not including rock music) happening around me in my lifetime. Like the name of local landmarks. This young cluck's faux pax is in line with surveys that show that most young Americans aren't sure who we fought against in WWII, much less WW1, and many can't name any 2 of the last 4 U.S. presidents. If it isn't on MTV or whatever has replaced MTV in the consciousness of young America, it doesn't exist. If you'd have to look it up on Google, it's too much trouble. On an early TV show, it was commonplace for Groucho Marx (look him up on Google) to ask a contestant ``Who is buried in Grant's Tomb?" I suspect that is now a serious question on college history exams. If the test givers even know who Grant was. It burns me up that weatherpeople on local TV aren't primed to know how to pronounce ``Waxahachie" or ``Bosque" before they embarrass themselves and their station. Farrington Field? Can any of you recall when pro footballers played there? It was, I guess, either 1961 or 1962 and the Dallas Texans (Lamar Hunt's team) played the Denver Broncos. Denver was wearing those god-awful brown and gold striped socks. Frank Tripucka was the Denver QB. Tripucka was from Notre Dame and probably had never been in Fort Worth until then. But I bet he could pronounce the name of the stadium he was in.
  36. 2 points
    Well, here it is, folks. This first ranking comes out with the usual caveat: it's early. Many of the teams are ranked on the basis of two games played against FBS competition, including the top 2 teams in the ranking, conference mates Baylor and West Virginia. In fact, this may be the first time that every team has emerged past the 2 FBS opponents threshold by week 4 since I started doing this. Usually there is a straggler or two with more than one bye or FCS opponent in the early part of the season. The Frogs come in at number 9, which frankly is higher than I thought they would be. The Frogs' ranking is buoyed in a large part by their yardage differential, where they rank 6th in the country, gaining 224 more yards against their opponents than the average team has. DUSHEE, at this point, has SMU as an average FBS team (rank 68th, DUSHEE score 1.37 ... a score of 0 is average) and Tech as a top 15 team. Minnesota comes in at 49th with a DUSHEE score of 7.90. TCU's schedule strength is among the top 25 in the country right now, keeping in mind that DUSHEE is completely unaware that the SFA game was played. DUSHEE is a big fan of the Big XII-II after 4 weeks, ranking them easily the best conference based on the average team scores. Five Big XII-II teams are ranked in the top 14. And, like last year, DUSHEE is not on board with ESPN's touting of the Pac12 as the next emerging super conference. It places ZERO teams in the top 15 and only two (USC, Stanford) in the top 25. In fact, DUSHEE has the Pac12 as the lowest rated "Power 5" conference by some margin. In fact, DUSHEE has the Left Coasters closer in conference strength to the American Athletic Conference than the Big 12, SEC, or ACC. Here is the week 4 conference ratings: B12 17.93 SEC 12.80 ACC 11.98 B10 6.32 P12 3.97 AAC -0.24 MAC -9.81 MWC -14.61 CUSA -17.43 SBC -20.99 A few obvious early candidates for the 2015 WTF team have emerged. No. 8 Iowa, no. 22 Vanderbilt, and no. 23 Pitt all merit future scrutiny as the weeks progress. Again, keeping in mind that there is a lot of movement in this ranking early in the season. Last season LSU opened as the #2 DUSHEE team in week 5 and were #20 by season's end. Georgia Tech started week 5 as the 50th ranked team last season; they finished the season at number 13. Finally, carrying forward the discussion of the last blog post, venue is still being ignored. Until I can get a handle on what the statistical impact home games have on the DUSHEE rankings, I will wait to adjust rankings until I have that handle. That adjustment may not happen until after the regular season. And with all that, here is your inaugural 2015 DUSHEE rankings: Rank Team P/G Y/G Score 1 Baylor 43.75 513.25 54.53 2 West Virginia 53.25 321.75 51.40 3 Clemson 39.00 286.75 40.17 4 Alabama 33.25 318.54 37.91 5 Oklahoma 28.67 235.00 30.72 6 Tennessee 25.11 187.50 26.01 7 Notre Dame 23.71 196.25 25.50 8 Iowa 19.00 205.00 22.80 9 TCU 17.50 224.06 22.74 10 Mississippi 20.78 166.83 22.10 __________________________________________ 11 Michigan 19.83 177.67 22.00 12 Miami (FL) 18.67 166.00 20.65 13 Northwestern 17.44 164.17 19.74 14 Texas Tech 20.50 121.28 19.66 15 North Carolina 24.58 63.92 19.55 16 USC 22.54 77.71 18.87 17 Ohio St. 18.00 125.00 18.18 18 Stanford 18.83 110.21 18.00 19 Middle Tenn. St. 16.44 137.72 17.77 20 Texas A&M 18.79 104.46 17.69 ________________________________________________ 21 Georgia 17.06 115.06 17.06 22 Vanderbilt 15.83 129.61 16.96 23 Pittsburgh 17.75 101.50 16.85 24 Air Force 12.50 164.25 16.45 25 Boston Coll. 10.50 187.00 16.24 26 Arkansas 13.79 142.08 16.22 27 Louisiana Tech 11.72 166.94 16.06 28 Memphis 8.89 195.67 15.60 29 LSU 18.83 60.67 15.55 30 N.C. State 12.83 140.33 15.49 __________________________________________________ 31 Florida 16.83 84.50 15.40 32 Florida St. 12.17 145.00 15.28 33 Georgia Tech 13.06 117.67 14.52 34 BYU 15.29 82.08 14.25 35 Navy 17.50 45.75 13.93 36 Louisville 15.67 66.67 13.74 37 Oklahoma St. 12.39 98.00 13.10 38 UCLA 13.00 64.33 11.85 39 Indiana 10.06 83.11 10.81 40 Iowa St. 10.25 76.50 10.61 ________________________________________________ 41 Utah 17.17 -23.46 10.29 42 Houston 9.25 75.25 9.89 43 Wisconsin 11.33 45.21 9.79 44 Connecticut 8.33 65.83 8.81 45 Illinois 8.00 66.67 8.63 46 Kansas St. 7.08 76.17 8.49 47 Temple 14.33 -24.17 8.36 48 Appalachian State 5.50 94.50 8.34 49 Minnesota -0.13 161.50 7.90 50 Nebraska 7.13 57.46 7.59 _____________________________________________ 51 Arizona St. 6.39 60.50 7.25 52 Mississippi St. 10.50 -8.33 6.59 53 Tulsa 4.28 73.61 6.49 54 Duke 3.67 62.50 5.53 55 Boise St. 5.50 32.72 5.28 56 Troy 3.33 59.08 5.14 57 Michigan St. 8.38 -10.88 5.05 58 Washington 8.33 -11.33 5.00 59 Massachusetts 7.89 -6.50 4.94 60 Penn St. 9.25 -26.25 4.87 __________________________________________________ 61 Cent. Michigan 2.17 52.06 4.02 62 South Carolina 9.21 -53.04 3.52 63 Oregon 5.28 -3.06 3.37 64 California 7.00 -30.78 3.15 65 Washington St. -0.25 42.75 1.95 66 East Carolina 2.83 0.06 1.89 67 West. Kentucky 2.88 -4.13 1.71 68 SMU -2.83 66.00 1.37 69 Kentucky 3.25 -21.08 1.12 70 Oregon St. -2.17 49.56 1.00 ___________________________________________________ 71 Bowling Green -6.50 96.88 0.45 72 Virginia Tech 1.06 -7.28 0.34 73 Texas 5.54 -81.46 -0.33 74 Wake Forest -1.17 -3.50 -0.95 75 Arizona -3.11 -3.67 -2.26 76 Army -0.39 -46.39 -2.55 77 Ball St. -1.61 -34.28 -2.77 78 Georgia Southern -2.67 -25.17 -3.02 79 Toledo 1.56 -86.50 -3.24 80 Syracuse 0.50 -100.00 -4.61 ______________________________________________________ 81 Virginia -8.22 9.44 -5.01 82 Cincinnati -11.33 33.83 -5.88 83 Ohio -1.67 -110.72 -6.58 84 Auburn -4.67 -83.83 -7.25 85 Northern Illinois -5.39 -86.44 -7.86 86 Utah St. -2.58 -147.00 -8.99 87 Buffalo -5.39 -120.78 -9.56 88 Missouri -12.67 -24.39 -9.65 89 Maryland -8.78 -109.89 -11.28 90 Akron -11.17 -87.50 -11.77 __________________________________________________ 91 LA Monroe -16.75 -19.75 -12.14 92 Colorado St. -18.56 -2.78 -12.51 93 Florida Atlantic -16.38 -35.63 -12.68 94 Rutgers -8.67 -149.89 -13.18 95 Florida Intl. -14.33 -77.17 -13.37 96 UNLV -11.89 -115.39 -13.63 97 Hawaii -11.61 -144.44 -14.88 98 W. Michigan -13.89 -116.39 -15.01 99 UT-San Antonio -21.25 -24.75 -15.39 100 Nevada -7.72 -225.39 -16.29 __________________________________________________ 101 Rice -21.00 -71.28 -17.52 102 Marshall -11.50 -211.25 -18.11 103 Southern Miss -16.89 -148.22 -18.58 104 Wyoming -25.61 -49.67 -19.53 105 Arkansas St. -20.11 -164.94 -21.56 106 South Alabama -26.00 -95.22 -22.04 107 Kent St. -28.67 -66.11 -22.38 108 San Jose St. -27.50 -93.67 -22.96 109 South Florida -19.75 -203.50 -23.22 110 Purdue -25.08 -155.42 -24.40 ____________________________________________________ 111 Old Dominion -21.89 -203.06 -24.63 112 East. Michigan -22.75 -207.63 -25.43 113 UCF -19.56 -255.94 -25.69 114 New Mexico -27.00 -161.83 -26.00 115 LA Lafayette -26.58 -193.08 -27.26 116 Idaho -24.56 -243.44 -28.40 117 Texas St. -29.00 -191.83 -28.81 118 Colorado -30.33 -213.67 -30.78 119 San Diego St. -28.33 -241.61 -30.83 120 Fresno St. -29.44 -238.61 -31.42 ____________________________________________________ 121 Kansas -27.00 -276.25 -31.65 122 Miami (OH) -33.06 -209.61 -32.40 123 UNC-Charlotte -37.00 -198.56 -34.48 124 Georgia State -38.83 -181.83 -34.87 125 New Mexico St. -36.22 -259.78 -36.99 126 UTEP -36.44 -256.89 -36.99 127 North Texas -43.33 -251.50 -41.32 128 Tulane -46.75 -311.50 -46.56 By Conference 28 Memphis 8.89 195.67 15.60 42 Houston 9.25 75.25 9.89 44 Connecticut 8.33 65.83 8.81 47 Temple 14.33 -24.17 8.36 53 Tulsa 4.28 73.61 6.49 66 East Carolina 2.83 0.06 1.89 68 SMU -2.83 66.00 1.37 82 Cincinnati -11.33 33.83 -5.88 110 South Florida -19.75 -203.50 -23.22 114 UCF -19.56 -255.94 -25.69 _______________________________________________ 3 Clemson 39.00 286.75 40.17 12 Miami (FL) 18.67 166.00 20.65 15 North Carolina 24.58 63.92 19.55 23 Pittsburgh 17.75 101.50 16.85 25 Boston Coll. 10.50 187.00 16.24 30 N.C. State 12.83 140.33 15.49 32 Florida St. 12.17 145.00 15.28 33 Georgia Tech 13.06 117.67 14.52 36 Louisville 15.67 66.67 13.74 54 Duke 3.67 62.50 5.53 72 Virginia Tech 1.06 -7.28 0.34 74 Wake Forest -1.17 -3.50 -0.95 80 Syracuse 0.50 -100.00 -4.61 81 Virginia -8.22 9.44 -5.01 _______________________________________________ 8 Iowa 19.00 205.00 22.80 11 Michigan 19.83 177.67 22.00 13 Northwestern 17.44 164.17 19.74 17 Ohio St. 18.00 125.00 18.18 39 Indiana 10.06 83.11 10.81 43 Wisconsin 11.33 45.21 9.79 45 Illinois 8.00 66.67 8.63 49 Minnesota -0.13 161.50 7.90 50 Nebraska 7.13 57.46 7.59 57 Michigan St. 8.38 -10.88 5.05 60 Penn St. 9.25 -26.25 4.87 89 Maryland -8.78 -109.89 -11.28 94 Rutgers -8.67 -149.89 -13.18 111 Purdue -25.08 -155.42 -24.40 _______________________________________________________ 1 Baylor 43.75 513.25 54.53 2 West Virginia 53.25 321.75 51.40 5 Oklahoma 28.67 235.00 30.72 9 TCU 17.50 224.06 22.74 14 Texas Tech 20.50 121.28 19.66 37 Oklahoma St. 12.39 98.00 13.10 40 Iowa St. 10.25 76.50 10.61 46 Kansas St. 7.08 76.17 8.49 73 Texas 5.54 -81.46 -0.33 122 Kansas -27.00 -276.25 -31.65 ______________________________________________________ 19 Middle Tenn. St. 16.44 137.72 17.77 27 Louisiana Tech 11.72 166.94 16.06 67 West. Kentucky 2.88 -4.13 1.71 93 Florida Atlantic -16.38 -35.63 -12.68 95 Florida Intl. -14.33 -77.17 -13.37 99 UT-San Antonio -21.25 -24.75 -15.39 101 Rice -21.00 -71.28 -17.52 103 Marshall -11.50 -211.25 -18.11 104 Southern Miss -16.89 -148.22 -18.58 112 Old Dominion -21.89 -203.06 -24.63 124 UNC-Charlotte -37.00 -198.56 -34.48 127 UTEP -36.44 -256.89 -36.99 128 North Texas -43.33 -251.50 -41.32 128 Tulane -46.75 -311.50 -46.56 ____________________________________________________ 7 Notre Dame 23.71 196.25 25.50 34 BYU 15.29 82.08 14.25 35 Navy 17.50 45.75 13.93 76 Army -0.39 -46.39 -2.55 _______________________________________________ 59 Massachusetts 7.89 -6.50 4.94 61 Cent. Michigan 2.17 52.06 4.02 71 Bowling Green -6.50 96.88 0.45 77 Ball St. -1.61 -34.28 -2.77 79 Toledo 1.56 -86.50 -3.24 83 Ohio -1.67 -110.72 -6.58 85 Northern Illinois -5.39 -86.44 -7.86 87 Buffalo -5.39 -120.78 -9.56 90 Akron -11.17 -87.50 -11.77 98 W. Michigan -13.89 -116.39 -15.01 108 Kent St. -28.67 -66.11 -22.38 113 East. Michigan -22.75 -207.63 -25.43 123 Miami (OH) -33.06 -209.61 -32.40 _________________________________________________ 24 Air Force 12.50 164.25 16.45 55 Boise St. 5.50 32.72 5.28 86 Utah St. -2.58 -147.00 -8.99 92 Colorado St. -18.56 -2.78 -12.51 96 UNLV -11.89 -115.39 -13.63 97 Hawaii -11.61 -144.44 -14.88 100 Nevada -7.72 -225.39 -16.29 105 Wyoming -25.61 -49.67 -19.53 109 San Jose St. -27.50 -93.67 -22.96 115 New Mexico -27.00 -161.83 -26.00 120 San Diego St. -28.33 -241.61 -30.83 121 Fresno St. -29.44 -238.61 -31.42 ___________________________________________________ 16 USC 22.54 77.71 18.87 18 Stanford 18.83 110.21 18.00 38 UCLA 13.00 64.33 11.85 41 Utah 17.17 -23.46 10.29 51 Arizona St. 6.39 60.50 7.25 58 Washington 8.33 -11.33 5.00 63 Oregon 5.28 -3.06 3.37 64 California 7.00 -30.78 3.15 65 Washington St. -0.25 42.75 1.95 70 Oregon St. -2.17 49.56 1.00 75 Arizona -3.11 -3.67 -2.26 119 Colorado -30.33 -213.67 -30.78 ____________________________________________________ 48 Appalachian State 5.50 94.50 8.34 56 Troy 3.33 59.08 5.14 78 Georgia Southern -2.67 -25.17 -3.02 91 LA Monroe -16.75 -19.75 -12.14 106 Arkansas St. -20.11 -164.94 -21.56 107 South Alabama -26.00 -95.22 -22.04 116 LA Lafayette -26.58 -193.08 -27.26 117 Idaho -24.56 -243.44 -28.40 118 Texas St. -29.00 -191.83 -28.81 125 Georgia State -38.83 -181.83 -34.87 126 New Mexico St. -36.22 -259.78 -36.99 _____________________________________________________ 4 Alabama 33.25 318.54 37.91 6 Tennessee 25.11 187.50 26.01 10 Mississippi 20.78 166.83 22.10 20 Texas A&M 18.79 104.46 17.69 21 Georgia 17.06 115.06 17.06 22 Vanderbilt 15.83 129.61 16.96 26 Arkansas 13.79 142.08 16.22 29 LSU 18.83 60.67 15.55 31 Florida 16.83 84.50 15.40 52 Mississippi St. 10.50 -8.33 6.59 62 South Carolina 9.21 -53.04 3.52 69 Kentucky 3.25 -21.08 1.12 84 Auburn -4.67 -83.83 -7.25 88 Missouri -12.67 -24.39 -9.65
  37. 2 points
    Noting that there is currently quite a bit said or shown about the 100th anniversary of World War I, it hit me that most of us probably haven't known a WWI veteran. Even the WWII people are now older than I am. But every time I go to our kitchen I am reminded of WWI because there is a small piece of furniture, originally a bedside stand, I presume, that we use as a telephone for the phone in our breakfast room, right by the kitchen. It is very well made, and was, I think, a wedding present or something similar for my parents, who wed in 1932. It was made by Potts Royer. And that's almost all I really know about him. In my young days I spent a lot of time at my grandparents' home when they lived in town in Henrietta. And Potts Royer lived, with his parents, I think, across the street. Remember than I was 3, 4, 5, maybe 6 and surely 7 (while I temporarily attended 2nd grade in Henrietta during a wartime move by my folks). I can't recall what Potts Royer looked like. I know I saw him. I remember he had a shop in their garage or a shed behind the house. But I also remember at some point being advised by my parents or maybe my grandmother not to bother Potts. I was given to understand, in a vague way, that Potts wasn't quite right because he had been in the war. If he was in WWI, he must have been lin his early 40s when I would have seen him in Henrietta. Whenever I see To Kill a Mockingbird, I think of Potts. Boo Radley came back from the same war and didn't quite fit in, if you will recall. Something like that was true of Potts Royer. The little nightstand was always referred to, in our home, as ``Potts Royer's table." I still think of it that way. And I have no idea what became of Potts Royer. Like I said, I was very young when I knew of him. And by 1946 my grandparents had moved back to a farm, and then about 1955 moved back into Henrietta, but to a different house. I never saw Potts again. Don't remember anyone every mentioning him when we visited Clay County. But I have the stand he made. He, and it, are my only connections to what my grandparents, in the years before Pearl Harbor, still considered the Great War. It's a very good, solid little stand. I like to think Potts would have been similarly solid....he and Boo Radley, too....had it not been for that war.
  38. 2 points
    I feel old today. Watched some TV stuff about Pearl Harbor yesterday, Dec. 7, and then realized that I am surely the only on this entire forum who was alive 72 years ago. Most of your parents weren't even around then. To 95 percent of Americans Dec. 7 is the day they show Tora, Tora, Tora on at least one channel. It is a part of a page (I assume) in a history textbook. It is a couple monuments you can visit with head bowed if you vacation in Hawaii. Hey, that war is over. We won. It is now more notable for having introduced the atom bomb than for what it actually meant. But, looking back, our war that started with Pearl Harbor was the sundering event for America in the 20th century, and for guys like me who were just old enough at the time to understand what happened. Look at it this way. America after World War I was a lot like America before World War I, but with radios and more cars. America after World War II was and is nothing like America before World War II. Pearl Harbor was actually the final stone in getting over the Great Depression of the 1930s. America went back to work, one way or another. America was no longer captive of its isolation protected by two oceans, and never will be again. America was forced to become (really for the first time) a world power, with the world's most powerful military. It emerged from the war with the greatest economy in the world, which we have not quite managed to fritter away yet. The war that caught us asleep with Pearl Harbor led to the greatest act of generosity (however self-serving in its own way) ever...the Marshall Plan which rebuilt Europe, or part of it. We all owe a debt to those who led (faltering at times, but led nevertheless) us to success in that war, and especially to the more than 16 million who served and the almost 300,000 who died. Gadzooks! I was actually in college with people who had served in World War II. I had first cousins who were in that war, including one who trudged through France and into Germany carrying a razor in his pack but never using it because at 18 he still had no beard and another cousin who wound up marrying a German girl (years later they ran a liquor store on Padre Island). Soon all the veterans of World War II will be gone. And even those of us who were kids during the war, collecting paper and tin cans and stuff for the war effort. To us, that war was, as Dobie Gillis' dad said so eloquently, ```the big one." So on future Dec. 7's, remember not just those who died beneath Japanese bombs in Pearl Harbor, but also the unbelievable changes it marked for our nation.
  39. 2 points
    With Fred Taylor's death today, I had to hark back to this..... I dealt with five active TCU head coaches, and they were a very diverse group of men. First was Abe Martin, the Jacksboro Philosopher, who drawled and acted country but was really quite a guy. I never was close to Abe, but enjoyed him. Oddly enough he was the straight man in a couple of the funnier things I recall from my years hanging around TCU football. First was on the sidelines during a workout and Abe mentioned to Allie White, his line coach, ``If old E.A. just had speed he'd be a great linebacker," and Allie responded, ``Coach, if he had speed he'd be at Texas." The other was when the Jim Pittman staff had just been at TCU a few weeks, and Abe, who had had some heart difficulties by then, was taking his daily several laps walking around the concourse at Daniel Meyer. Billy Tohill, Pitt's irrepressible defensive coordinator, passed him and said, ``Coach Martin, you gettin' any?" Abe was dumbfounded. I covered the Frogs during Fred Taylor's four-year stint. He was accessible, honest to deal with, but probably not equipped to be a head coach in a rapidly-changing college football atmosphere.Or paid to be head coach, for that matter. Or given much help by the administration (TCU surely had the lowest-paid football staff in the SWC, by a good margin). Being around Fred taught me just how physically and emotionally wearing coaching could be. He aged 10 years in those four years. He had students after his head, alums grumbling, you name it. And then when he was able to recruit some outstanding black players, and had something on which to build, it came tumbling and he was ``reassigned." He longed, in his last season, for one-platoon football, dreaming of putting guys like Ray Rhodes, Hodges Mitchell and Danny Colbert on the field both ways instead of having to find 22 good-enough-to-start players to go against Texas and a huge squad. Not surprisingly, the job got to Fred. When working out on the practice field he more than once sent a student manager across the street to make sure someone on an apartment balcony was not spying for the next opponent. Jim Pittman followed, and was one of the most impressive guys I ever met. He could dominate a practice field just by standing there. His glare, if annoyed or angered, could peel paint off a fencepost. But his face also could light up in the world's biggest smile. It turned out that his health was worse than anyone thought. He passed away on the sideline during a game in Waco. Miz Scribe and I had gotten to know Jim and Jane Pittman, and we mourned. I'll finish this with Billy Tohill and Jim Shofner (two more opposite people I cannot imagine), but not today....to be continued....
  40. 2 points
    Hello Yogis, I started my Yoga practice at TCU some many years ago. Over the years I gone to a lot of different classes, both good and bad. I even practice Yoga on my own each morning (or try some mornings are better than others). Yoga has helped me on good days and bad days. I definitely do not think I could have made it through law school and the bar without some of the things I have learned from Yoga. Most people know Yoga as the stretching exercise class that women do to stay in shape. This is an untrue stereotype about yoga. Men and even some of the best athletes in the world of both genders use Yoga to help improve their own sports. Yoga can be much more than just stretching. I enjoy Yoga because it has helped with my breathing, stress, anxiety, back pain, and knee injuries. It has built total body strength based from my core muscles and helped clear my mind of unneeded stress. I have attached (hopefully, the upload worked) some poses that go from simple to advanced. I encourage anyone who practices yoga to try new poses. Some of the fun of yoga is the challenge of trying to hold a new pose. At first some poses can be extremely hard. However, Yoga is something that can constantly be improved and adjusted. Its part of the beauty of Yoga is that allows a person to move through different positions allowing for a new experience to occur. Growing up I loved to play competitive sports. Yoga is non-traditional competitive sport. Some may ask what is a non-traditional competitive sport mean? It means that the competition is against oneself. In yoga someone will always be better than you. It does not matter because you are not competing against others. I have a hard time touching my toes. Yep, I said it! You may ask how can someone who has been doing Yoga for so many years have a hard time touching their toes? It is something that I have always had to work on with stretching. While this has always been a challenging pose for me in Yoga. I've seen a Yoga teacher who can bend forward over and lay her head down on her knees! While she could do a lot of the flexible poses, she struggled with some of the arm balancing poses that come easy for me. The point is that you can always learn something in Yoga even if you practice by yourself or with others! I encourage others to post about their Yoga practice. Namaste.
  41. 2 points
    More about antique travels, but first an anecdote or two. Like when we flew to Boston and rented a car to drive up to Maine. We were upgraded to a Cadillac (Seville, I think, this was in 1990). Miz Scribe's comment was, ``Well, this makes it hard. Try driving up in a Cadillac and asking somebody for their best price on something...." That same trip we hit a heat wave in Maine. We were staying at the Cape Arundel Inn at Kennebunkport and the temp was in the 90s. They had no A/C, but the clerk told us proudly, ``But we have a fan in each room!" True. The fan in our room was about 3" in diameter. That same trip we were trying to find West Lebanon, me., where the chef at our inn had an antiques shop. We never saw a sign for it. After we crossed a creek, I saw a store and stopped there to ask the way. Turned out we were in New Hampshire. We had managed to miss Maine. Later that day we pulled up at an antiques shop outside Rochester, N.H. That was the summer after here in Texas we heard folks say ``Let a Yankee freeze" because soaring oil prices (nice for us down here) were making heating oil too dear for many folks up north. They remembered up there. We pulled up in our rented Caddy and went inside and immediately I picked up on conversation among some locals, who were cussing Texas and Texans for the ills of the world. ``Hon," I whispered to Miz Scribe, ``pay cash here. Don't write one of our checks on our Texas bank or they might lynch us." Many years later when we were cruising eastern Pa. and drove over into Lambertville, N.J., we found a three-story antiques mall that had good stuff. We discovered that you were supposed to pay on each floor for what you found on that floor.....and having spent the day buying stuff, we had only one check left. But God looks out for those ready to buy, and the folks at the mall decided we could, after all, pay for everything with one check and they would work out any persnickety accounting details. Some more of our favorite places: Springfield, Ohio, was a regular big stop. There are three huge antique malls there, right off the interstate. Martinsville, W.Va., was a place we always spent the night on our way to Md. and Pa. Good place for a room and dinner. Our usual first shopping stop the next day was Beaver Creek, Md., where two big malls are almost next door to each other. From there we usually went north to Gettysburg and New Oxford, Pa. The route took us through the Catoctin Mountains (and probably within a mile or two of Camp David, though there is a lack of signs giving directions to that presidential hideaway). Speaking of Gettysburg, we bought little there, but did stay one time in a motel on the site of Lee's headquarters. Gettysburg we treated as a sort of shrine. If you have never been there, it is a visit to cherish. We dined once in an inn on the spot where Lincoln spoke. The cemeteries there are something else, lacking only Confederate dead. In fact, we have found all the Civil War cemeteries and battlefields to be emotional stops, and we have been to several (Vicksburg, Antietam, Harper's Ferry, Gettysburg, Shiloh, Chickamauga, etc.) We loved Maine. On later trips, including one where we drove from FW to Maine and back, we stayed in or around Boothbay Harbor, Very nice area. Love the rocky coast of Maine. And perhaps the best shopping we ever saw was up around Waterville. Another regular stop was Medina, Ohio, either on our way north or on our way south. A great mall there. But we spent more time in Nashville than anywhere else. For a long time there was a huge antiqueing experience there, in Feb. or March, with the Heart o'Country Show at the Opryland Hotel and 3-4 other shows across the street at Fiddler's Motel and other venues. Heart is no longer what it was (the couple that ran it have passed away and now there are about half as many exhibitors), but back in the 1990s it was heaven on earth for American country stuff. They had seminars on antiques in conjunction with the show, and Miz S. enjoyed that. But the shopping was tremendous. Fiddlers, and a 3-story motel nearby were total antiques. Every room was a dealer's shop, plus all the furniture and stuff in the parking lots. One feature each year with the seminars was a road trip with expert commentary. We went to Franklin, Columbia, the Hermitage and other places. Saw some unbelievable pre-Civil War plantation homes. One of our guides was an old professor, John Kiser, who had advised on the restoration of several antebellum homes and he became a good friend. Another guide was Robert Hicks, who had a thriving music business and had sold it to one of the big international music outfits. As our bus prowled through Williamson county, south of Nashville, he pointed out where all the country stars had built gadzillion-dollar mansions on many acres of land. Then we had supper at one of his own houses, an 1850-ish place somewhat added-to for comfort in the 1990s. At that time lots of entertainment stars were leaving the West Coast and relocating to the Franklin, Tn. area. I figure it was because they got so much better BBQ in Franklin than in Los Angeles. I can see there will have to be a third chapter to this mishmash, because we haven't even touched on Atlanta or Cincinnati or Michigan yet! Or the leaves in Mississippi! Or the Lexington-Paris, Ky., area! Or the mall on Goss in Louisville! Or Baton Rouge and New Orleans! So much territory, so little time!
  42. 2 points
    Monty Python might very well have never reached our shores had it not been for local television in Dallas-Fort Worth. Back in the mid-'70s, some executive at Channel 13 (the PBS channel, of course, so executive is likely a very strong word here) dug some tape out of an old bin of castaway shows. On it was some weird stuff from some oddball Brits. KERA had already established itself as the first TV station in the US to broadcast British comedy (true), but this was a little different, a little non-traditional. "Are You Being Served?" it was not. Could Channel 13 actually put this stuff on TV, this communist hippie PBS "executive" wondered? Eh, why not? Nobody's watching, anyway. What could it hurt? Well, it didn't hurt anything. In fact, it rapidly established the Pythons, who had been doing their bit in Britain for a while by that point, as cult stars in the US. So, on the way back from a premiere of Monty Python and the Holy Grail in Los Angeles (a movie for which there was not yet a US distributor at the time), the Pythons made one of there very first public appearances in Dallas, in the studio of KERA, or possibly in some rec room at a junior high school. It's hard to tell. A very nervous man with an impressive beard interviews the group (minus John Cleese). The Pythons took questions from the audience, some of which (Who is Monty Python?) we'll have to forgive for their naivete. It was 1975, after all, and there was nothing but public TV sharing Monty Python with the United States. Remember, there was no Wikipedia, no Twitter, not even cable in any serious way. These were the good old days. As some whiny little guy from modern public radio will explain in the introduction to the video, a random engineer at Channel 13 kept this footage, even though the end of it is cut off and lost forever. Unearthed about seven years ago, this tape was slapped on YouTube and viewed for the first time since 1975, and for the first time, presumably, outside of Dallas-Fort Worth. Since it only has about 160,000 views, though, chances are it might be new to you, as it was to me. Also, in case you miss the subtle allusion to it at the outset of the tape, this interview was part of Public Television's Festival '75. Pay close attention. The beauty of this 10 or so minutes of footage doesn't just revolve around the Pythons themselves, although they're obviously awesome. As if they were at an elementary school assembly, the crowd, presumably made up of regular local folks, is sitting on the floor. KERA seems to have sprung for some folding chairs or something for the Pythons--which explains why there's a pledge drive going on (of course) during the interview, phones ringing off their little '70s-yellow bases. Watch out for a few other things, too. The guy asking a question at about the 10:40 mark just has to be wicked stoned. The accents, for some reason, seem really strong, much stronger than today's Texas drawl. And there's also a stuffed armadillo. From 1975 (and Festival '75!), it's Monty Python in Dallas: And now to the comedy. Dear sweet Lord in heaven, where do we even start with this? It defies words. Evidently, this promo bit from Channel 8 from 1980 never aired. WFAA executives showed it to advertising agencies and other insider-types only. Thank God for that. The beginning of this clip likely signaled the death of the true '70s (although it was late 1980 by the time this, uh, happened) because if disco had ever been cool, what these people at the beginning of this video did to it rendered it uncool for eternity, or at lest until Generation X got a hold of it ironically in the '90s. But the dancing doesn't stop there. Go about 45 seconds in, and Channel 8 people are dancing, more or less. Yes, people who work there, apparently. Some of them are on-air people; Troy Dungan really does appear to be dancing with the little red and blue arrows he would have used to show warm and cold fronts back then. In fact, everybody seems to be interpretatively dancing something related to his or her job at the station. There's reel-to-reel tape, a huge channel 8 logo and other '70s TV stuff. Things slow down for a little bit after that, aside from the male host of PM Magazine scratching himself or adjusting his tube sock or something in the show's promo. Keep going, though. Get to about the 3:20 mark. That's when stuff gets real. It's time to pimp Channel 8 news, with the news team you can trust...to do weird stuff in this video. Seriously, behind a voice-over talking about all the awards the station has won, there are reporters tripping over themselves, anchors screwing around, what appears to be Tracy Rowlett sneaking up behind some woman reporter and kissing her...and then...and then... Out of nowhere, Verne Lundquist just gets up, plaid sport jacket and all, and gives Tracy a huge hug. I mean a manly bear grip that should have been way more awkward than it was. This goes on for several seconds. All of this comes after Channel 8 has run some smack about the other newscasts in town, actually showing clips from them while playing a song (maybe by Anne Murray?) that semi-subtly refers to how much they suck. Yeah, suck on it, 4 and 5! Where's your video of reporters blowing kisses to the camera, sexy dancing, committing what must have been sexual harassment and engaging in gentleman-on-gentleman contact? News 8 is number one, baby! Whoooo! Get on back over here, Tracy! From 1980, Channel 8's likely chemically influenced in-house promo: Better times. Better times.
  43. 2 points
    Just a few footballish things about Dutch: Never heard him say, or take credit for saying ``Fight em on the ice." What he did say, any time we talked football, was ``fahr and desahr! Gotta have fahr and desahr!" He could roar that, and I am sure he demanded it of his players. While he considered Baugh the greatest player he had, and loved Davey O'Brien, he thought that Kyle Gillespie, who followed O'Brien, might have been just as good had he not been hurt. Dutch was very loyal. He never forgave the Aggies for firing Matty Bell in 1933. He and Matty were very good friends even while coaching against each other when Bell led SMU right before the war and again after the war. I've mentioned before that Dutch went to his spread not for passing but for better blocking angles to run the ball. And in giving Mrs. Scribe lessons on how to watch football, he stressed following the guards, not the ball. Enough for today...
  44. 2 points
    To my shame, my only voyage outside the U.S. (other than driving a few miles into Canada from Detroit) was a 1982 or 83 golfing trip to Guadalajara. Our group was four couples and we stayed at the El Tapatio Hotel or resort ....beautiful place that is still there. Two of us guys and all the wives went down one day, followed the next day by the other two fellows. Naturally, my buddy Pat Richardson and I went right out the first afternoon to play one of the two nearby courses. Here's what I recall: You could get a cart, which was handy for carrying a load of beer, but also had to employ caddies. The caddies were about 9 years old, but they could guide us to the next teebox and they didn't drink any of the beer. I remember on one of the holes we teed off from atop a cliff to a green about, oh, 300 feet below us....looked almost straight down but I guess it wasn't. Anyway, that was fun. The next morning we were joined by the other guys and tried the other course that had been recommended. It had been built by Bing Crosby and while the fairways were lush green, a few feet off the fairway was utter desolate desert, sandy and rocky. Funny thing there was watching our caddies walking along the fairways, plucking bananas or plantains or some such off the trees. Frankly, with all the beer and as bad as I was at golf at that time, I don't really remember much about our rounds. The girls were the ones that really had fun...shopping while we played golf. And one day they decided to take a bus to Tlachipacque for some really great shopping. Unfortunately, none of them spoke Spanish and they wound up on the third class bus....like the ones in the movies (remember the bus Kathleen Turner rode in Romancing the Stone? That was it....people carrying live chickens, etc.). The bus stopped and one of our ladies had to visit the little girls room, and the bus tried to leave again without her. Miz Scribe and another gal, unable to make the driver understand, forcibly held open the door so that the bus couldn't leave their friend behind. The trip was fun. Shopping was good. Food was good. Beer was great. Then, as we were preparing to leave, all hell broke loose. That was the week that the peso crashed and there were riots and really competitive elections were about to held for the first time in years. So we left for the airport amid trucks full of dangerous fellows with machine guns, roaming the streets. And then we discovered that we had to pay a departure tax of some kind at the airport, which we did happily if they would only let us on the plane. Miz Scribe flew back holding one of her treasures, an ancient Mexican saddle tree (the other gals had bought many skirts, blouses, etc., but you-know-who was looking for antiques!) in her lap. She also brought back a painting which is hanging on the wall above this computer. It is a cat, wearing an orange ribbon. Couple years ago I looked up the artist (Gustavo Martinez) and discovered that he is well known, some of his stuff is worth a good bit and is handled by some fancy galleries in this country. We will leave it to our granddaughter. We also acquired a taste for an excellent fried cheese dish. I got the recipe for it. Finally, I found the right cheese at an Hispanic grocery here in Fort Worth. I gave the recipe to one of the Pulidos and they may still be using it. In return they provided and delivered tamales to me and my coworkers in the S-T think tank at Christmas!
  45. 1 point
    No movement in the top 4 although Clemson increased its lead over Bama a bit this week and the Frogs fell (only) 4 more spots to 47th, helped by outgaining Kansas by 200 yards despite losing. The largest faller this week in both ranking and score was Baylor, who dropped 26 spots in the ranking to 83rd. The biggest climber this week was Georgia Southern who beat DUSHEE darling Appalachian State and climbed 33 spots to 56th. TCU Week-by-Week The Kansas game looks bad, but maybe not as bad as you might imagine. The Frogs did almost 5 points worse against Kansas than their average opponent has but 115 yards better, making the Kansas game only the third worst on the season for the Frogs in DUSHEE score (behind OU and Texas). The SMU, Ohio State and Iowa State games still look like solid performances, although all of those games are getting awfully far away in the rearview mirror. Opp: @ SMU N OhSt @ Tex | ISU Ttech OU | @ Kan PD: 17.17 9.29 -9.86 | 7.00 2.50 -2.00 | -4.67 YD: 21.17 169.71 41.43 | 190.00 93.00 -101.29 | 115.17 Score: 12.46 14.33 -4.58 | 13.78 6.13 -6.19 | 2.41 TCU's Next Opponent (Kansas State) Kansas State has, if possible, been even more underwhelming than the Frogs. By far their best performance came against Oklahoma State in Week 7, a 31-12 whooping of the Fightin' Mullets, and in that game, K-State garnered a score 2 TDs better than any performance TCU has had this year. That said, their performances against their two toughest opponents, Mississippi State and Oklahoma, were 3 TDs worse than any performance TCU has had this year. Outside of Okie St. and UTSA, K-State has been a below average team, usually well-below average. Opp: MissSt UTSA WVU | Tex @ Bay OkSt | @ OU PD: -15.83 14.43 -13.40 | 1.57 -13.00 28.67 | -15.71 YD: -279.83 10.57 -60.00 | -102.57 -103.00 181.00 | -325.29 Score: -23.98 10.13 -11.81 | -3.87 -13.61 27.80 | -26.08 I find this difficult to type, but DUSHEE has TCU as a better than 2 TD favorite at home against the Fightin' Snyders, winning about 78% of the time. DUSHEE has K-State as only slightly better than Kansas. Of course, you see how well we did against the Jayhawks. Performances of the Week Top 3 45.78 -- Clemson at Florida St. (49 MOV, 277 YM) 43.66 -- West Virginia vs. Baylor (44 MOV, 281 YM) 42.96 -- Utah State vs. New Mexico (42 MOV, 413 YM) Bottom 3 -35.51 -- Ball St. vs. Ohio (-38 MOV, -312 YM) -33.84 -- New Mexico at Utah State (-42 MOV, -413 YM) -31.59 -- Baylor at WVU (-44 MOV, -281 YM) Conference Rankings SEC 11.53 B12 6.58 B10 6.37 ACC 3.23 P12 2.34 AAC -3.34 MWC -4.07 CUSA -6.78 MAC -7.56 SBC -9.10 Strength of Schedule Top 10 1 A&M 11.95 2 Mizz 11.87 3 Tenn 11.55 4 LSU 10.00 5 ISU 9.76 6 UCLA 9.05 7 TCU 8.59 8 MissSt 8.32 9 Neb 7.97 10 MichSt 7.87 Bottom 10 122 USU -7.08 123 USM -8.26 124 Troy -8.31 125 Mem -8.49 126 UCF -8.57 127 UTSA -9.24 128 Ohio -9.64 129 USF -10.15 130 FIU -10.16 131 TexSt -16.04 Overall Ratings Rank Team PD YD Score Rk +/- Score +/- 1 Clemson 37.86 301.37 39.70 0 0.21 2 Alabama 36.47 280.20 37.76 0 -0.99 3 Michigan 25.86 254.14 29.43 0 -0.12 4 Oklahoma 24.17 196.03 25.52 0 0.54 5 Georgia 23.95 126.58 22.04 2 2.19 6 LSU 23.19 118.33 21.14 -1 -1.58 7 Ohio St. 18.49 159.42 19.98 1 0.29 8 Iowa 17.78 140.03 18.57 2 -0.33 9 Penn St. 21.31 82.18 18.15 0 -1.15 10 Texas A&M 12.68 177.00 16.95 -4 -3.76 11 N.C. State 14.17 139.63 16.15 2 -1.83 12 North Texas 14.74 128.17 15.98 2 -1.67 13 Army 16.41 99.72 15.73 6 0.79 14 Missouri 15.39 110.54 15.56 -2 -2.61 15 Utah 14.93 106.17 15.05 6 0.61 16 Fresno St. 16.77 77.76 14.91 10 1.84 17 West Virginia 16.33 74.08 14.44 15 4.02 18 Notre Dame 15.39 84.80 14.33 2 -0.29 19 Iowa St. 12.59 116.88 14.00 10 2.23 20 Mississippi St. 12.57 106.69 13.50 4 -0.36 21 Temple 12.70 104.51 13.48 4 0.19 22 Utah St. 17.48 30.22 13.10 17 6.11 23 Appalachian State 14.35 72.33 13.04 -12 -5.54 24 Texas Tech 11.73 99.14 12.58 -2 -1.83 25 Purdue 12.95 81.15 12.52 -10 -4.07 26 Washington 11.23 103.14 12.43 -8 -3.17 27 Miami (FL) 10.89 101.57 12.14 -10 -3.92 28 Florida 13.63 62.88 12.10 -5 -1.92 29 Washington St. 9.98 111.54 12.01 -1 -0.45 30 UCF 14.32 50.52 11.97 0 1.40 31 Boise St. 11.00 92.59 11.78 0 1.31 32 Kentucky 12.24 73.72 11.70 -5 -1.25 33 Wisconsin 9.25 99.15 10.93 -17 -5.29 34 UAB 9.72 92.28 10.91 -1 1.18 35 Michigan St. 11.15 64.63 10.54 2 2.41 36 Cincinnati 7.83 55.08 7.87 0 -0.91 37 Boston Coll. 8.51 45.43 7.85 14 3.72 38 Houston 8.57 39.70 7.62 14 3.95 39 Texas 7.96 44.79 7.46 -5 -2.09 40 Buffalo 6.70 54.45 7.08 2 1.07 41 Auburn 6.83 40.09 6.48 0 0.21 42 Syracuse 6.89 34.44 6.24 7 1.48 43 Virginia 5.44 51.16 6.08 -5 -0.94 44 Maryland 6.42 37.15 6.06 2 0.53 45 South Carolina 5.68 46.06 6.00 -10 -3.28 46 Oklahoma St. 5.91 33.57 5.55 -1 -0.14 47 TCU 2.78 75.60 5.48 -4 -0.46 48 Stanford 8.76 -11.86 5.27 2 0.98 49 Mississippi 2.04 60.95 4.29 -1 -0.49 50 Georgia Tech 3.95 32.10 4.18 8 2.75 51 Ohio 3.30 23.28 3.32 29 7.11 52 Arizona St. 4.08 11.08 3.25 2 0.20 53 Northwestern 3.27 15.40 2.92 12 3.11 54 Minnesota 1.53 34.59 2.68 2 0.77 55 Nebraska -2.30 86.96 2.64 -2 -0.54 56 Georgia Southern 7.43 -58.11 2.16 33 7.91 57 USC 2.45 -0.89 1.59 4 0.58 58 Vanderbilt 4.73 -41.44 1.17 2 -0.14 59 Duke 4.40 -37.67 1.13 -12 -4.36 60 BYU 1.08 8.02 1.11 -1 -0.22 61 Colorado -1.52 35.38 0.69 -21 -5.60 62 Oregon -0.38 15.71 0.50 -18 -5.31 63 Arizona -2.87 47.64 0.38 28 6.54 64 San Diego St. -0.07 2.93 0.09 -1 -0.44 65 East. Michigan 1.69 -24.53 -0.05 -10 -2.00 66 Louisiana Tech 0.00 -11.20 -0.54 0 -0.15 67 UCLA -1.47 0.26 -0.97 -5 -1.73 68 Air Force -0.51 -16.85 -1.15 11 2.29 69 Tennessee -1.27 -6.29 -1.15 1 0.14 70 Southern Miss -8.02 87.23 -1.16 3 1.02 71 Pittsburgh 0.81 -41.32 -1.44 6 1.81 72 East Carolina -8.41 82.75 -1.64 -4 -0.95 73 Miami (OH) -2.36 -4.28 -1.78 -2 0.24 74 Indiana -4.63 17.37 -2.26 -10 -2.18 75 Marshall -0.75 -38.46 -2.35 0 0.14 76 Florida Intl. -0.08 -49.57 -2.43 8 2.25 77 Memphis -2.48 -26.13 -2.90 6 1.27 78 Troy -3.09 -27.22 -3.37 -2 -0.15 79 Liberty -4.00 -16.93 -3.48 -1 -0.10 80 Toledo -0.59 -73.02 -3.89 16 3.97 81 Florida Atlantic -6.38 6.43 -3.94 5 1.07 82 Arkansas St. -5.97 -0.08 -3.99 -10 -1.88 83 Baylor -4.84 -17.39 -4.06 -26 -5.77 84 Wyoming -4.67 -19.76 -4.06 4 1.38 85 LA Lafayette -5.69 -8.56 -4.21 2 0.88 86 California -6.19 -6.50 -4.44 6 2.78 87 W. Michigan -7.49 8.68 -4.58 -18 -3.73 88 Virginia Tech -3.88 -46.90 -4.84 -21 -4.28 89 Northern Illinois -3.74 -63.22 -5.53 -8 -1.57 90 Tulane -5.47 -39.62 -5.55 5 2.07 91 Kansas St. -1.90 -97.02 -5.92 -17 -3.51 92 Nevada -5.08 -54.32 -5.99 1 1.37 93 Arkansas -8.73 -4.85 -6.05 -8 -1.36 94 Florida St. -6.60 -35.74 -6.12 -12 -2.16 95 Middle Tenn. St. -2.89 -98.68 -6.66 7 3.82 96 South Florida -6.13 -56.39 -6.79 -2 0.61 97 UNC-Charlotte -10.79 -5.11 -7.44 2 1.17 98 North Carolina -13.19 -1.77 -8.88 0 -0.54 99 Kansas -5.96 -110.72 -9.29 2 -0.32 100 Ball St. -9.67 -66.63 -9.65 -10 -3.72 101 SMU -8.89 -87.36 -10.12 8 3.44 102 Wake Forest -9.21 -85.05 -10.22 3 1.79 103 Tulsa -11.25 -69.58 -10.84 -3 -2.06 104 Hawaii -10.30 -92.44 -11.30 2 1.19 105 New Mexico -9.34 -109.23 -11.47 -8 -3.33 106 Navy -9.86 -108.53 -11.78 -2 -0.18 107 Coastal Carolina -11.93 -82.03 -11.89 1 1.20 108 Colorado St. -17.04 -45.54 -13.55 -5 -3.01 109 Akron -11.62 -126.64 -13.82 3 1.90 110 Cent. Michigan -15.03 -86.50 -14.17 -3 -1.30 111 West. Kentucky -16.30 -88.83 -15.13 -1 -0.82 112 Louisville -17.13 -110.36 -16.72 -1 -2.36 113 Oregon St. -18.81 -106.54 -17.65 9 5.04 114 UTEP -17.42 -132.01 -17.95 5 2.81 115 Georgia State -18.42 -119.67 -18.02 2 1.50 116 Old Dominion -19.53 -115.67 -18.57 -3 -1.91 117 Massachusetts -17.19 -149.77 -18.64 -1 0.28 118 LA Monroe -19.76 -120.05 -18.93 0 1.04 119 UNLV -18.05 -159.43 -19.68 -4 -1.57 120 South Alabama -20.10 -143.10 -20.26 0 1.38 121 Illinois -16.94 -189.58 -20.39 -7 -3.28 122 San Jose St. -20.29 -166.35 -21.51 3 2.97 123 Rice -22.24 -148.85 -21.97 3 3.69 124 Rutgers -21.51 -170.86 -22.54 0 0.94 125 Kent St. -22.13 -175.50 -23.18 -2 0.23 126 UT-San Antonio -20.89 -203.12 -23.67 -5 -1.16 127 Bowling Green -26.64 -139.53 -24.45 0 1.81 128 New Mexico St. -24.67 -175.01 -24.84 1 3.08 129 Texas St. -23.15 -211.50 -25.58 -1 2.17 130 Connecticut -26.77 -281.79 -31.37 0 -0.43 By Conference AAC 21 Temple 12.70 104.51 13.48 30 UCF 14.32 50.52 11.97 36 Cincinnati 7.83 55.08 7.87 38 Houston 8.57 39.70 7.62 72 East Carolina -8.41 82.75 -1.64 77 Memphis -2.48 -26.13 -2.90 90 Tulane -5.47 -39.62 -5.55 96 South Florida -6.13 -56.39 -6.79 101 SMU -8.89 -87.36 -10.12 103 Tulsa -11.25 -69.58 -10.84 106 Navy -9.86 -108.53 -11.78 130 Connecticut -26.77 -281.79 -31.37 ACC 1 Clemson 37.86 301.37 39.70 11 N.C. State 14.17 139.63 16.15 27 Miami (FL) 10.89 101.57 12.14 37 Boston Coll. 8.51 45.43 7.85 42 Syracuse 6.89 34.44 6.24 43 Virginia 5.44 51.16 6.08 50 Georgia Tech 3.95 32.10 4.18 59 Duke 4.40 -37.67 1.13 71 Pittsburgh 0.81 -41.32 -1.44 88 Virginia Tech -3.88 -46.90 -4.84 94 Florida St. -6.60 -35.74 -6.12 98 North Carolina -13.19 -1.77 -8.88 102 Wake Forest -9.21 -85.05 -10.22 112 Louisville -17.13 -110.36 -16.72 B1G 3 Michigan 25.86 254.14 29.43 7 Ohio St. 18.49 159.42 19.98 8 Iowa 17.78 140.03 18.57 9 Penn St. 21.31 82.18 18.15 25 Purdue 12.95 81.15 12.52 33 Wisconsin 9.25 99.15 10.93 35 Michigan St. 11.15 64.63 10.54 44 Maryland 6.42 37.15 6.06 53 Northwestern 3.27 15.40 2.92 54 Minnesota 1.53 34.59 2.68 55 Nebraska -2.30 86.96 2.64 74 Indiana -4.63 17.37 -2.26 121 Illinois -16.94 -189.58 -20.39 124 Rutgers -21.51 -170.86 -22.54 BXII-II 4 Oklahoma 24.17 196.03 25.52 17 West Virginia 16.33 74.08 14.44 19 Iowa St. 12.59 116.88 14.00 24 Texas Tech 11.73 99.14 12.58 39 Texas 7.96 44.79 7.46 46 Oklahoma St. 5.91 33.57 5.55 47 TCU 2.78 75.60 5.48 83 Baylor -4.84 -17.39 -4.06 91 Kansas St. -1.90 -97.02 -5.92 99 Kansas -5.96 -110.72 -9.29 CUSA 12 North Texas 14.74 128.17 15.98 34 UAB 9.72 92.28 10.91 66 Louisiana Tech 0.00 -11.20 -0.54 70 Southern Miss -8.02 87.23 -1.16 75 Marshall -0.75 -38.46 -2.35 76 Florida Intl. -0.08 -49.57 -2.43 81 Florida Atlantic -6.38 6.43 -3.94 95 Middle Tenn. St. -2.89 -98.68 -6.66 97 UNC-Charlotte -10.79 -5.11 -7.44 111 West. Kentucky -16.30 -88.83 -15.13 114 UTEP -17.42 -132.01 -17.95 116 Old Dominion -19.53 -115.67 -18.57 123 Rice -22.24 -148.85 -21.97 126 UT-San Antonio -20.89 -203.12 -23.67 Indies 13 Army 16.41 99.72 15.73 18 Notre Dame 15.39 84.80 14.33 60 BYU 1.08 8.02 1.11 79 Liberty -4.00 -16.93 -3.48 117 Massachusetts -17.19 -149.77 -18.64 128 New Mexico St. -24.67 -175.01 -24.84 MAC 40 Buffalo 6.70 54.45 7.08 51 Ohio 3.30 23.28 3.32 65 East. Michigan 1.69 -24.53 -0.05 73 Miami (OH) -2.36 -4.28 -1.78 80 Toledo -0.59 -73.02 -3.89 87 W. Michigan -7.49 8.68 -4.58 89 Northern Illinois -3.74 -63.22 -5.53 100 Ball St. -9.67 -66.63 -9.65 109 Akron -11.62 -126.64 -13.82 110 Cent. Michigan -15.03 -86.50 -14.17 125 Kent St. -22.13 -175.50 -23.18 127 Bowling Green -26.64 -139.53 -24.45 MWC 16 Fresno St. 16.77 77.76 14.91 22 Utah St. 17.48 30.22 13.10 31 Boise St. 11.00 92.59 11.78 64 San Diego St. -0.07 2.93 0.09 68 Air Force -0.51 -16.85 -1.15 84 Wyoming -4.67 -19.76 -4.06 92 Nevada -5.08 -54.32 -5.99 104 Hawaii -10.30 -92.44 -11.30 105 New Mexico -9.34 -109.23 -11.47 108 Colorado St. -17.04 -45.54 -13.55 119 UNLV -18.05 -159.43 -19.68 122 San Jose St. -20.29 -166.35 -21.51 P12 15 Utah 14.93 106.17 15.05 26 Washington 11.23 103.14 12.43 29 Washington St. 9.98 111.54 12.01 48 Stanford 8.76 -11.86 5.27 52 Arizona St. 4.08 11.08 3.25 57 USC 2.45 -0.89 1.59 61 Colorado -1.52 35.38 0.69 62 Oregon -0.38 15.71 0.50 63 Arizona -2.87 47.64 0.38 67 UCLA -1.47 0.26 -0.97 86 California -6.19 -6.50 -4.44 113 Oregon St. -18.81 -106.54 -17.65 SBC 23 Appalachian State 14.35 72.33 13.04 56 Georgia Southern 7.43 -58.11 2.16 78 Troy -3.09 -27.22 -3.37 82 Arkansas St. -5.97 -0.08 -3.99 85 LA Lafayette -5.69 -8.56 -4.21 107 Coastal Carolina -11.93 -82.03 -11.89 115 Georgia State -18.42 -119.67 -18.02 118 LA Monroe -19.76 -120.05 -18.93 120 South Alabama -20.10 -143.10 -20.26 129 Texas St. -23.15 -211.50 -25.58 SEC 2 Alabama 36.47 280.20 37.76 5 Georgia 23.95 126.58 22.04 6 LSU 23.19 118.33 21.14 10 Texas A&M 12.68 177.00 16.95 14 Missouri 15.39 110.54 15.56 20 Mississippi St. 12.57 106.69 13.50 28 Florida 13.63 62.88 12.10 32 Kentucky 12.24 73.72 11.70 41 Auburn 6.83 40.09 6.48 45 South Carolina 5.68 46.06 6.00 49 Mississippi 2.04 60.95 4.29 58 Vanderbilt 4.73 -41.44 1.17 69 Tennessee -1.27 -6.29 -1.15 93 Arkansas -8.73 -4.85 -6.05
  46. 1 point
    I figure interest in this blog is niche at best, even when the Frogs are playing well. So I assume at this point, I'm just writing this for myself. But nonetheless, for this week's entry in the second saddest diary ever written (allowing that Anne Frank's is probably still a little sadder) ... Clemson reclaims the top spot in the rankings, but it really is just Clemson, Bama, and the rest of the field at this point. There is an almost 10-point gap between those two teams and 3rd ranked Michigan. The Sooners rose to the 4th spot in the rankings, due mostly to Ohio State and Penn State falling significantly. A team I'd like to focus on this week is USF, which if DUSHEE is any judge, may be the worst 7-0 team in the history of major college football. After beating the lowest-ranked DUSHEE team, UConn, by only a TD, DUSHEE now has Charlie Strong's Bulls ranked 94th. That "win" garnered USF a DUSHEE score of -31.40 for the week. When combined with playing the second easiest schedule in FBS ... USF's opponents are, on average, almost 2TDs worse than an average FBS team ... Georgia Tech (ranked 58th), Illinois (114), East Carolina (68), UMass (116), Tulsa (100), UConn (130) ... and only beating that ridiculously easy schedule by an average of 8-points, USF appears to be a paper tiger of the highest order. Things start getting a little tougher for the Bulls next week with @Houston (52), Tulane (95), @Cincinnati (36), @Temple (25), and UCF (30) ... the remaining 5 games include the 4 best teams in the American as rated by DUSHEE. (Although DUSHEE thinks UCF is extremely overrated too, just not as much as USF.) The only one of those 5 games where USF should be favored is the game at home against Tulane and DUSHEE expects the Bulls to be heavy underdogs for all of the other 4 (best chance of winning is 23% at Houston this week). DUSHEE gives USF an 0.05% chance of going undefeated through those 5 games. Frogs Because DUSHEE has OU still very highly rated and had little expectation that the Frogs would be competitive, the Frogs didn't really drop as much as you might think, falling four spots to 43rd. The Frogs week-to-week look like this now: Opp: @ SMU N OhSt @ Tex | ISU Ttech OU PD: 15.80 9.29 -8.50 | 6.00 5.40 -4.33 YD: 20.40 169.71 64.17 | 192.00 118.20 -150.83 Score: 11.51 14.34 -2.58 | 13.22 9.28 -10.13 So it was actually a pretty decent week in the moral victory department for the Frogs. While the performance against OU was judged the worst of the season, and the walloping that Purdue put on Ohio State really dropped the Frogs' comparative score against the Buckeyes a ton, the wins against SMU and Iowa State are looking solid at this point, and even the loss to Tech looks pretty decent with Tech's excellent play of late. As of this moment, only the Texas and Oklahoma games look like total turds. Believe it or not (I expect most will not), DUSHEE has the Frogs as favorites for 4 of the remaining 5 games: @Kansas +12 (67% chance Frogs win) Kansas St. +12.5 (72%) @West Virginia -7.5 (34%) @Baylor +0.5 (51%) Oklahoma St. +4 (56%) As of now, the Frogs have played the 4th toughest schedule in FBS, according to DUSHEE. Although, that will take a hit this week as the Frogs play ... Frogs Next Opponent (Kansas) Playing Kansas is generally the salve that calms troubled football teams, but God knows that has rarely been the case for the Frogs. After showing some signs early in the season that the Jayhawks might have improved a little this season (ignoring Nichols St., as DUSHEE does), Kansas has returned to form of late, and seems to be in turmoil after dumping Meachem. Hopefully, the Frogs take care of business as they did last year. As mentioned above, DUSHEE has the Frogs as 12-point favorites on the road. Opp: @ CMU Rut @ Bay | OkSt @ WVU @ Ttech PD: 12.33 25.57 -25.40 | -16.80 -4.25 -29.40 YD: 18.67 148.71 -154.00 | -194.40 -205.00 -207.00 Score: 9.12 24.19 -24.33 | -20.54 -12.68 -29.54 So after looking like a reasonable football team against two other really bad teams (CMU and Rutgers), Kansas has returned to form in conference play, getting pounded by everybody by at least 3 TDs. Top Performances of the Week 50.70 Clemson vs. NC-State (34 MOV, 174 YM) 46.46 Missouri vs. Memphis (32 MOV, 238 YM) 46.02 Purdue vs. Ohio St. (29 MOV, -7 YM) Bottom Performances of the Week -50.46 Oregon St. vs. Cal (-42 MOV, -298 YM) -38.55 Bowling Green at Ohio (-35 MOV, -283 YM) -36.11 Minnesota at Nebraska (-25 MOV, -185 YM) Conference Ratings SEC 12.62 B12 7.31 B10 7.01 ACC 3.85 P12 2.30 AAC -4.04 MWC -4.91 CUSA -7.60 MAC -7.89 SBC -9.95 Overall Rankings Week 8 Rank Team PD YD Score Rk +/- Score +/- 1 Clemson 36.58 314.39 39.49 1 0.66 2 Alabama 37.21 290.28 38.75 -1 -0.44 3 Michigan 26.00 254.44 29.55 0 0.81 4 Oklahoma 24.62 178.43 24.98 2 0.07 5 LSU 24.63 131.21 22.72 2 -0.78 6 Texas A&M 16.18 206.57 20.71 5 0.88 7 Georgia 21.43 115.93 19.85 3 -0.44 8 Ohio St. 18.19 157.38 19.68 -3 -6.82 9 Penn St. 22.64 87.45 19.30 -5 -8.44 10 Iowa 18.09 142.36 18.90 7 2.50 11 Appalachian State 19.41 117.35 18.57 -3 -4.64 12 Missouri 16.51 149.15 18.17 15 6.05 13 N.C. State 15.92 153.32 17.98 -4 -4.77 14 North Texas 16.73 135.10 17.64 2 1.11 15 Purdue 16.65 114.46 16.60 19 6.92 16 Wisconsin 15.02 129.11 16.21 2 -0.06 17 Miami (FL) 13.91 141.25 16.06 3 0.68 18 Washington 14.74 120.29 15.61 3 1.08 19 Army 16.36 83.93 14.94 -7 -2.77 20 Notre Dame 16.28 78.38 14.62 -1 -1.17 21 Utah 13.76 109.67 14.44 4 2.12 22 Texas Tech 14.00 105.65 14.41 1 1.43 23 Florida 15.51 76.82 14.03 -9 -2.87 24 Mississippi St. 13.34 103.37 13.86 -9 -2.78 25 Temple 12.57 102.30 13.29 -3 -0.17 26 Fresno St. 14.64 68.91 13.07 6 2.89 27 Kentucky 14.71 65.49 12.95 -14 -4.01 28 Washington St. 9.21 131.52 12.46 5 2.30 29 Iowa St. 10.92 93.52 11.77 0 0.12 30 UCF 12.71 43.55 10.57 1 0.04 31 Boise St. 9.39 87.61 10.47 9 2.03 32 West Virginia 12.52 43.16 10.42 -8 -1.90 33 UAB 8.69 81.99 9.73 15 4.76 34 Texas 9.71 63.99 9.55 -8 -2.75 35 South Carolina 8.95 69.01 9.28 6 1.29 36 Cincinnati 9.36 52.69 8.77 9 2.79 37 Michigan St. 9.00 44.23 8.13 -7 -3.10 38 Virginia 7.14 47.03 7.02 6 0.84 39 Utah St. 13.46 -41.28 6.99 -11 -4.70 40 Colorado 4.83 63.86 6.29 -3 -2.45 41 Auburn 6.70 37.48 6.27 10 1.55 42 Buffalo 5.66 46.50 6.01 8 1.23 43 TCU 3.94 68.94 5.94 -4 -2.65 44 Oregon 5.21 48.58 5.80 13 2.55 45 Oklahoma St. 6.44 29.24 5.70 1 -0.26 46 Maryland 5.70 36.17 5.54 -11 -4.04 47 Duke 9.69 -20.27 5.49 -9 -3.15 48 Mississippi 2.57 63.73 4.78 5 0.69 49 Syracuse 5.23 26.57 4.76 7 1.42 50 Stanford 9.00 -35.66 4.29 -1 -0.52 51 Boston Coll. 5.91 3.92 4.13 -8 -2.30 52 Houston 5.03 6.44 3.66 0 -0.43 53 Nebraska -1.85 91.83 3.18 13 3.85 54 Arizona St. 4.20 5.30 3.05 -12 -3.61 55 East. Michigan 3.47 -7.49 1.95 16 3.79 56 Minnesota 1.61 17.43 1.91 -20 -7.64 57 Baylor 0.69 25.97 1.71 -2 -1.67 58 Georgia Tech 0.90 17.28 1.43 1 -0.81 59 BYU 2.20 -2.97 1.33 5 1.57 60 Vanderbilt 4.85 -40.07 1.31 3 1.18 61 USC 2.11 -8.27 1.01 -14 -4.17 62 UCLA 0.81 4.56 0.76 -1 -0.15 63 San Diego St. 1.94 -15.93 0.53 -9 -3.32 64 Indiana -3.13 41.77 -0.08 12 2.96 65 Northwestern -0.03 -3.64 -0.19 -5 -1.81 66 Louisiana Tech 0.36 -12.95 -0.39 -8 -3.52 67 Virginia Tech 1.38 -30.86 -0.56 0 0.81 68 East Carolina -7.30 87.00 -0.69 9 2.41 69 W. Michigan -4.08 38.94 -0.85 6 1.81 70 Tennessee -1.56 -5.18 -1.29 0 0.53 71 Miami (OH) -2.36 -9.41 -2.03 13 3.06 72 Arkansas St. -4.15 13.67 -2.11 0 -0.24 73 Southern Miss -7.48 58.57 -2.17 12 2.99 74 Kansas St. 0.52 -57.40 -2.41 -5 -0.75 75 Marshall -0.77 -41.13 -2.49 3 0.73 76 Troy -3.85 -13.53 -3.22 11 2.60 77 Pittsburgh -1.68 -44.43 -3.25 -3 -0.95 78 Liberty -3.60 -20.37 -3.38 -5 -1.45 79 Air Force -2.24 -40.41 -3.44 0 0.40 80 Ohio -3.14 -35.34 -3.79 13 4.42 81 Northern Illinois -2.62 -46.01 -3.96 8 2.70 82 Florida St. -3.78 -29.94 -3.96 6 2.43 83 Memphis -3.80 -34.23 -4.18 -18 -3.93 84 Florida Intl. -2.64 -60.81 -4.68 8 2.65 85 Arkansas -7.53 6.99 -4.69 1 1.12 86 Florida Atlantic -7.05 -6.61 -5.02 -6 -0.50 87 LA Lafayette -5.96 -23.14 -5.08 11 4.65 88 Wyoming -5.63 -35.14 -5.44 12 5.65 89 Georgia Southern -0.45 -113.54 -5.75 2 1.24 90 Ball St. -6.39 -34.65 -5.93 -9 -1.15 91 Arizona -9.90 9.08 -6.17 -1 0.76 92 California -9.48 -18.83 -7.22 15 5.42 93 Nevada -7.86 -44.29 -7.37 10 4.50 94 South Florida -7.66 -47.96 -7.41 -26 -5.81 95 Tulane -7.00 -61.53 -7.62 -33 -7.88 96 Toledo -4.71 -98.34 -7.86 -1 1.52 97 New Mexico -7.07 -71.29 -8.14 -3 0.10 98 North Carolina -13.96 20.06 -8.34 8 4.24 99 UNC-Charlotte -12.86 -0.77 -8.61 -3 0.79 100 Tulsa -9.72 -47.95 -8.78 -17 -3.89 101 Kansas -6.32 -98.84 -8.96 -19 -4.10 102 Middle Tenn. St. -8.87 -95.11 -10.48 0 1.15 103 Colorado St. -14.33 -20.53 -10.54 1 1.44 104 Navy -10.00 -102.82 -11.60 4 2.10 105 Wake Forest -11.40 -91.91 -12.01 -6 -1.49 106 Hawaii -11.60 -99.05 -12.49 -5 -1.39 107 Cent. Michigan -13.95 -74.36 -12.87 -10 -3.46 108 Coastal Carolina -13.66 -83.04 -13.10 1 1.19 109 SMU -12.48 -109.22 -13.56 -4 -1.16 110 West. Kentucky -15.39 -84.42 -14.31 1 0.97 111 Louisville -13.93 -105.65 -14.36 1 1.73 112 Akron -13.34 -142.16 -15.72 -2 -0.54 113 Old Dominion -16.53 -117.56 -16.67 4 3.10 114 Illinois -13.28 -171.87 -17.11 1 0.87 115 UNLV -15.29 -164.86 -18.11 1 0.47 116 Massachusetts -17.06 -157.26 -18.92 3 3.59 117 Georgia State -19.65 -133.58 -19.52 -4 -2.97 118 LA Monroe -21.01 -124.09 -19.97 7 4.97 119 UTEP -20.68 -145.07 -20.75 1 2.40 120 South Alabama -20.38 -167.69 -21.64 -2 -0.57 121 UT-San Antonio -20.07 -190.28 -22.52 1 0.97 122 Oregon St. -25.50 -118.57 -22.69 -8 -5.81 123 Kent St. -22.30 -177.94 -23.41 1 1.22 124 Rutgers -22.78 -172.50 -23.47 -1 0.55 125 San Jose St. -24.29 -172.59 -24.48 2 3.21 126 Rice -25.90 -174.78 -25.66 0 1.83 127 Bowling Green -28.38 -152.84 -26.26 -6 -2.84 128 Texas St. -25.68 -221.20 -27.74 0 1.49 129 New Mexico St. -26.85 -208.74 -27.92 0 2.39 130 Connecticut -26.78 -272.45 -30.94 0 3.58 Rankings By Conference AAC 25 Temple 12.57 102.30 13.29 30 UCF 12.71 43.55 10.57 36 Cincinnati 9.36 52.69 8.77 52 Houston 5.03 6.44 3.66 68 East Carolina -7.30 87.00 -0.69 83 Memphis -3.80 -34.23 -4.18 94 South Florida -7.66 -47.96 -7.41 95 Tulane -7.00 -61.53 -7.62 100 Tulsa -9.72 -47.95 -8.78 104 Navy -10.00 -102.82 -11.60 109 SMU -12.48 -109.22 -13.56 130 Connecticut -26.78 -272.45 -30.94 ACC 1 Clemson 36.58 314.39 39.49 13 N.C. State 15.92 153.32 17.98 17 Miami (FL) 13.91 141.25 16.06 38 Virginia 7.14 47.03 7.02 47 Duke 9.69 -20.27 5.49 49 Syracuse 5.23 26.57 4.76 51 Boston Coll. 5.91 3.92 4.13 58 Georgia Tech 0.90 17.28 1.43 67 Virginia Tech 1.38 -30.86 -0.56 77 Pittsburgh -1.68 -44.43 -3.25 82 Florida St. -3.78 -29.94 -3.96 98 North Carolina -13.96 20.06 -8.34 105 Wake Forest -11.40 -91.91 -12.01 111 Louisville -13.93 -105.65 -14.36 B1G 3 Michigan 26.00 254.44 29.55 8 Ohio St. 18.19 157.38 19.68 9 Penn St. 22.64 87.45 19.30 10 Iowa 18.09 142.36 18.90 15 Purdue 16.65 114.46 16.60 16 Wisconsin 15.02 129.11 16.21 37 Michigan St. 9.00 44.23 8.13 46 Maryland 5.70 36.17 5.54 53 Nebraska -1.85 91.83 3.18 56 Minnesota 1.61 17.43 1.91 64 Indiana -3.13 41.77 -0.08 65 Northwestern -0.03 -3.64 -0.19 114 Illinois -13.28 -171.87 -17.11 124 Rutgers -22.78 -172.50 -23.47 BXII-II 4 Oklahoma 24.62 178.43 24.98 22 Texas Tech 14.00 105.65 14.41 29 Iowa St. 10.92 93.52 11.77 32 West Virginia 12.52 43.16 10.42 34 Texas 9.71 63.99 9.55 43 TCU 3.94 68.94 5.94 45 Oklahoma St. 6.44 29.24 5.70 57 Baylor 0.69 25.97 1.71 74 Kansas St. 0.52 -57.40 -2.41 101 Kansas -6.32 -98.84 -8.96 CUSA 14 North Texas 16.73 135.10 17.64 33 UAB 8.69 81.99 9.73 66 Louisiana Tech 0.36 -12.95 -0.39 73 Southern Miss -7.48 58.57 -2.17 75 Marshall -0.77 -41.13 -2.49 84 Florida Intl. -2.64 -60.81 -4.68 86 Florida Atlantic -7.05 -6.61 -5.02 99 UNC-Charlotte -12.86 -0.77 -8.61 102 Middle Tenn. St. -8.87 -95.11 -10.48 110 West. Kentucky -15.39 -84.42 -14.31 113 Old Dominion -16.53 -117.56 -16.67 119 UTEP -20.68 -145.07 -20.75 121 UT-San Antonio -20.07 -190.28 -22.52 126 Rice -25.90 -174.78 -25.66 Indies 19 Army 16.36 83.93 14.94 20 Notre Dame 16.28 78.38 14.62 59 BYU 2.20 -2.97 1.33 78 Liberty -3.60 -20.37 -3.38 116 Massachusetts -17.06 -157.26 -18.92 129 New Mexico St. -26.85 -208.74 -27.92 MAC 42 Buffalo 5.66 46.50 6.01 55 East. Michigan 3.47 -7.49 1.95 69 W. Michigan -4.08 38.94 -0.85 71 Miami (OH) -2.36 -9.41 -2.03 80 Ohio -3.14 -35.34 -3.79 81 Northern Illinois -2.62 -46.01 -3.96 90 Ball St. -6.39 -34.65 -5.93 96 Toledo -4.71 -98.34 -7.86 107 Cent. Michigan -13.95 -74.36 -12.87 112 Akron -13.34 -142.16 -15.72 123 Kent St. -22.30 -177.94 -23.41 127 Bowling Green -28.38 -152.84 -26.26 MWC 26 Fresno St. 14.64 68.91 13.07 31 Boise St. 9.39 87.61 10.47 39 Utah St. 13.46 -41.28 6.99 63 San Diego St. 1.94 -15.93 0.53 79 Air Force -2.24 -40.41 -3.44 88 Wyoming -5.63 -35.14 -5.44 93 Nevada -7.86 -44.29 -7.37 97 New Mexico -7.07 -71.29 -8.14 103 Colorado St. -14.33 -20.53 -10.54 106 Hawaii -11.60 -99.05 -12.49 115 UNLV -15.29 -164.86 -18.11 125 San Jose St. -24.29 -172.59 -24.48 P12 18 Washington 14.74 120.29 15.61 21 Utah 13.76 109.67 14.44 28 Washington St. 9.21 131.52 12.46 40 Colorado 4.83 63.86 6.29 44 Oregon 5.21 48.58 5.80 50 Stanford 9.00 -35.66 4.29 54 Arizona St. 4.20 5.30 3.05 61 USC 2.11 -8.27 1.01 62 UCLA 0.81 4.56 0.76 91 Arizona -9.90 9.08 -6.17 92 California -9.48 -18.83 -7.22 122 Oregon St. -25.50 -118.57 -22.69 SBC 11 Appalachian State 19.41 117.35 18.57 72 Arkansas St. -4.15 13.67 -2.11 76 Troy -3.85 -13.53 -3.22 87 LA Lafayette -5.96 -23.14 -5.08 89 Georgia Southern -0.45 -113.54 -5.75 108 Coastal Carolina -13.66 -83.04 -13.10 117 Georgia State -19.65 -133.58 -19.52 118 LA Monroe -21.01 -124.09 -19.97 120 South Alabama -20.38 -167.69 -21.64 128 Texas St. -25.68 -221.20 -27.74 SEC 2 Alabama 37.21 290.28 38.75 5 LSU 24.63 131.21 22.72 6 Texas A&M 16.18 206.57 20.71 7 Georgia 21.43 115.93 19.85 12 Missouri 16.51 149.15 18.17 23 Florida 15.51 76.82 14.03 24 Mississippi St. 13.34 103.37 13.86 27 Kentucky 14.71 65.49 12.95 35 South Carolina 8.95 69.01 9.28 41 Auburn 6.70 37.48 6.27 48 Mississippi 2.57 63.73 4.78 60 Vanderbilt 4.85 -40.07 1.31 70 Tennessee -1.56 -5.18 -1.29 85 Arkansas -7.53 6.99 -4.69
  47. 1 point
    Alabama retakes the top spot this week, but the Tide and Clemson have emerged as the clear top 2 with a bunch of B1G teams filling out the rest of the top 5. Yes, two-loss Penn State is still in the top 5, but they did have the second biggest single score drop of the week (Georgia dropped slightly more), falling over 10 points; the way the numbers worked out, however, they just dropped one spot, getting leapt by Michigan. Oklahoma did very well against the bye, jumping 2 spots and increasing their score by 2.5 points. We'll discuss how that happened when we look at Oklahoma's numbers in the 'TCU's next opponent' section. Frogs Week-by-Week The Frogs fell 5 spots to 39th, even though their score dropped less than a point. They fell because a lot of teams just under them jumped with strong performances: Duke, Minnesota, Purdue, Michigan St., and Iowa State all leapt the Frogs. Opp: @ SMU N OhSt @ Tex | ISU Ttech PD: 11.25 17.67 -8.50 | 6.00 -0.50 YD: -13.75 199.33 64.17 | 192.00 80.00 Score: 6.82 21.58 -2.51 | 13.44 3.60 Due to Iowa State's recent performance, our win against them, while visually ugly, is actually starting to look pretty good comparatively. The Tech loss was rated as mediocre as you might imagine and by far our best performance is still that loss to Ohio State. The Frogs are ranked 47th in the country in point differential, but 20th in yardage differential. This disparity is largely explained by the turnover situation with which we are all too aware. The Frogs have moved the ball on opponents like a top-20 team, but they sure haven't scored like one. Two pieces of potential solace for Frog fans are 1) neglecting the Southern matchup which is ignored by DUSHEE, the Frogs have the 6th toughest schedule in the country right now, and 2) of the 6 remaining Big 12 games left on our schedule, 4 are against teams actually ranked lower than the Frogs. So we have that going for us, which is nice. Missouri has had the toughest schedule according to DUSHEE. Frogs Next Opponent -- Oklahoma The Sooners have climbed to 6th in the rankings, despite the Texas loss. Here are their numbers to date: Opp: FAU UCLA @ ISU | Army Bay N Tex PD: 50.00 21.60 14.40 | 24.80 37.00 5.50 YD: 379.00 33.00 133.20 | 80.20 242.00 94.50 Score: 51.96 16.02 16.15 | 20.48 36.56 8.31 So the Texas game was definitely a dud for the Sooners (and the 'N' stands for 'neutral site', not 'North', for clarification), but outside of that game (Texas seems to have gotten the worst shot out of several of their opponents this year), the Sooners have been pretty impressive this year. The Army game, which everyone thought was a bad performance for the Sooners, was actually pretty good as the Cadets have far exceeded anybody's expectations and are ranked 12th in DUSHEE Original (and 20th even in DUSHEE Extra Crispy with the added emphasis on schedule strength). As mentioned above, the Sooners fared well during the bye, improving 2.5 points despite sitting at home. This was due to UCLA getting a blowout win over Cal, Iowa State whipping WVU, and Army blowing out SJfSU. Baylor and Texas played each other so that was a wash for the Sooners. The Sooners comparative performances against those 3 opponents all got big boosts this week. Against common opponents, the Sooners were about 3 points better than the Frogs against Iowa State ... but if you account for the fact that Oklahoma played the Cyclones in Ames and the Frogs got them in Ft. Worth, the Sooners were about 11 points better than the Frogs against Iowa State on a neutral field. The Sooners were about 11 points better than the Frogs against Texas, but again taking into account the fact that the Frogs played Texas in Austin and Oklahoma played them at a neutral site, the Sooners were about a touchdown better against the Horns. All that said, the Frogs are heavy underdogs to the Sooners ... 12 points, even after giving the Frogs a 4.2 point home field advantage (the current calculated number for the season). If this game were in Norman, the Frogs would be 3 TD dogs. DUSHEE gives the Frogs about a 27% chance of winning. Conference Rankings The Big XII-II still ranks second among the conferences, about a half point better (on average) than the B1G. SEC 12.48 BXII-ii 8.56 B1G 7.97 ACC 3.89 P12 2.51 AAC -3.01 MWC -5.85 MAC -8.87 CUSA -8.98 SBC -10.73 Top Performances of the Week 48.72 -- Iowa St vs. WVU (16 MOV, 346 YM) 46.95 -- LSU vs. UGa (20 MOV, 153 YM) 43.98 -- Alabama vs. Mizzou (29 MOV, 352 YM) Bottom Performances of the Week -56.00 -- New Mexico St. at Louisiana-Lafayette (-28 MOV, -353 YM) -43.52 -- Coastal Carolina vs. Louisiana-Monroe (-25 MOV, -27 YM) -41.66 -- Western Kentucky at UNC-Charlotte (-26 MOV, -192 YM) Overall Rankings Week 7 Rank Team PD YD Score Rk +/- Score +/- 1 Alabama 37.23 292.39 39.19 1 1.02 2 Clemson 34.97 315.62 38.83 -1 -1.92 3 Michigan 25.69 236.27 28.74 3 2.58 4 Penn St. 30.65 148.43 27.73 -1 -10.17 5 Ohio St. 25.91 187.61 26.50 0 -4.01 6 Oklahoma 25.55 160.32 24.91 2 2.53 7 LSU 24.55 145.18 23.50 8 5.30 8 Appalachian State 23.96 147.25 23.21 -1 -2.91 9 N.C. State 21.28 174.28 22.75 0 0.85 10 Georgia 21.14 126.18 20.30 -6 -10.56 11 Texas A&M 14.72 203.75 19.83 3 0.92 12 Army 19.39 97.35 17.71 7 1.35 13 Kentucky 18.34 96.31 16.96 5 -0.13 14 Florida 18.62 91.31 16.90 8 1.28 15 Mississippi St. 16.93 108.96 16.64 9 3.24 16 North Texas 15.93 120.40 16.54 11 4.70 17 Iowa 15.74 120.15 16.40 0 -0.84 18 Wisconsin 14.83 129.85 16.27 -5 -3.64 19 Notre Dame 17.81 79.64 15.79 -8 -5.09 20 Miami (FL) 12.81 139.15 15.38 0 -0.77 21 Washington 13.93 106.53 14.53 11 4.23 22 Temple 12.68 101.93 13.46 1 -2.06 23 Texas Tech 11.80 103.88 12.97 -11 -7.03 24 West Virginia 14.25 57.43 12.32 -14 -9.44 25 Utah 13.61 65.94 12.31 14 5.05 26 Texas 12.14 85.58 12.30 2 0.98 27 Missouri 10.35 106.18 12.12 -11 -5.25 28 Utah St. 17.39 1.97 11.69 8 2.50 29 Iowa St. 10.85 89.90 11.65 15 6.03 30 Michigan St. 10.95 79.80 11.22 10 4.36 31 UCF 11.78 54.26 10.52 4 1.27 32 Fresno St. 11.12 56.18 10.18 5 1.49 33 Washington St. 6.18 122.83 10.16 -4 -0.67 34 Purdue 7.74 91.82 9.67 14 4.54 35 Maryland 9.30 68.64 9.57 -4 -0.88 36 Minnesota 10.16 56.49 9.55 7 3.22 37 Colorado 7.08 81.72 8.74 -7 -1.98 38 Duke 14.12 -15.76 8.64 4 2.21 39 TCU 5.18 104.35 8.59 -5 -0.67 40 Boise St. 5.81 92.83 8.44 -15 -4.01 41 South Carolina 7.60 59.55 7.99 -20 -7.99 42 Arizona St. 7.82 29.47 6.66 -4 -1.89 43 Boston Coll. 8.14 20.40 6.43 2 0.87 44 Virginia 5.13 56.08 6.17 -3 -0.52 45 Cincinnati 7.21 23.92 5.98 7 2.30 46 Oklahoma St. 6.43 34.03 5.96 -20 -6.09 47 USC 3.66 55.77 5.18 7 1.92 48 UAB 2.75 63.82 4.97 29 8.90 49 Stanford 9.26 -27.76 4.81 2 0.82 50 Buffalo 4.07 41.92 4.78 10 2.56 51 Auburn 4.98 28.40 4.71 -18 -5.49 52 Houston 5.46 9.17 4.09 -6 -1.34 53 Mississippi 1.48 62.99 4.08 -6 -1.10 54 San Diego St. 4.94 11.34 3.85 -5 -0.57 55 Baylor 2.52 34.52 3.38 0 0.40 56 Syracuse 4.40 8.41 3.35 2 0.76 57 Oregon 3.29 21.53 3.25 -4 -0.13 58 Louisiana Tech 2.79 25.83 3.13 13 4.68 59 Georgia Tech 1.68 22.90 2.24 -2 -0.38 60 Northwestern 2.09 4.40 1.61 -4 -1.01 61 UCLA 1.15 2.96 0.91 6 2.19 62 Tulane 1.42 -13.86 0.27 3 0.43 63 Vanderbilt 3.74 -48.10 0.13 -13 -4.05 64 BYU 0.51 -11.84 -0.24 11 2.91 65 Memphis 0.10 -6.48 -0.25 24 6.30 66 Nebraska -6.71 77.27 -0.68 -7 -3.03 67 Virginia Tech 0.85 -39.40 -1.37 -6 -3.53 68 South Florida -0.96 -19.56 -1.60 -6 -3.31 69 Kansas St. 1.33 -51.93 -1.67 12 2.92 70 Tennessee -2.52 -2.79 -1.82 -7 -3.16 71 East. Michigan -1.63 -15.18 -1.84 12 2.87 72 Arkansas St. -4.68 25.58 -1.86 0 0.11 73 Liberty -1.70 -16.16 -1.93 9 2.74 74 Pittsburgh -1.33 -28.83 -2.30 -4 -0.80 75 W. Michigan -6.98 40.54 -2.66 -9 -1.96 76 Indiana -5.38 11.25 -3.04 -12 -3.00 77 East Carolina -8.86 57.18 -3.09 -1 0.18 78 Marshall -3.03 -24.30 -3.22 14 3.54 79 Air Force -1.05 -63.81 -3.84 1 0.70 80 Florida Atlantic -5.75 -13.88 -4.52 -6 -1.70 81 Ball St. -4.19 -40.35 -4.78 -12 -3.31 82 Kansas -1.59 -77.26 -4.86 -14 -3.52 83 Tulsa -4.57 -37.60 -4.90 1 0.19 84 Miami (OH) -5.37 -30.56 -5.09 11 2.93 85 Southern Miss -9.30 21.11 -5.16 12 3.63 86 Arkansas -9.64 12.59 -5.81 2 0.55 87 Troy -6.80 -26.10 -5.82 3 0.74 88 Florida St. -6.50 -41.94 -6.40 -2 -0.21 89 Northern Illinois -4.59 -73.08 -6.65 10 4.57 90 Arizona -10.89 6.89 -6.92 -12 -2.90 91 Georgia Southern -1.83 -117.38 -6.99 -12 -2.55 92 Florida Intl. -3.92 -95.99 -7.33 -7 -1.64 93 Ohio -6.23 -82.53 -8.21 -2 -1.55 94 New Mexico -5.99 -86.33 -8.23 -21 -6.03 95 Toledo -6.37 -104.37 -9.38 7 2.43 96 UNC-Charlotte -11.75 -31.89 -9.40 18 9.93 97 Cent. Michigan -9.26 -65.86 -9.41 8 4.21 98 LA Lafayette -10.75 -52.13 -9.73 14 7.19 99 Wake Forest -9.66 -83.12 -10.53 -1 -0.36 100 Wyoming -10.83 -78.76 -11.09 -6 -3.51 101 Hawaii -9.17 -101.35 -11.10 -8 -4.22 102 Middle Tenn. St. -11.22 -84.37 -11.63 2 0.71 103 Nevada -12.87 -66.96 -11.87 8 4.71 104 Colorado St. -14.10 -52.52 -11.98 2 1.92 105 SMU -11.53 -95.90 -12.40 -5 -1.00 106 North Carolina -19.35 6.43 -12.58 2 2.80 107 California -15.33 -49.27 -12.64 -20 -6.42 108 Navy -11.59 -121.52 -13.70 2 2.00 109 Coastal Carolina -15.46 -80.97 -14.29 -6 -2.46 110 Akron -11.85 -148.08 -15.18 5 4.24 111 West. Kentucky -16.66 -84.95 -15.28 -15 -7.23 112 Louisville -15.62 -115.52 -16.09 -5 -1.95 113 Georgia State -15.88 -121.29 -16.55 0 1.76 114 Oregon St. -19.94 -73.01 -16.88 -5 -1.25 115 Illinois -13.82 -178.36 -17.98 -14 -6.45 116 UNLV -17.01 -147.26 -18.58 0 1.17 117 Old Dominion -18.45 -151.84 -19.76 1 1.62 118 South Alabama -19.89 -158.76 -21.07 1 1.57 119 Massachusetts -18.69 -204.50 -22.51 6 4.00 120 UTEP -22.20 -169.93 -23.15 0 -0.13 121 Bowling Green -26.38 -118.70 -23.42 6 5.03 122 UT-San Antonio -21.61 -184.59 -23.48 0 0.27 123 Rutgers -23.27 -173.16 -24.02 -2 -0.64 124 Kent St. -23.26 -185.63 -24.63 -7 -3.42 125 LA Monroe -24.99 -168.45 -24.94 3 5.76 126 Rice -28.60 -171.32 -27.49 -3 -3.35 127 San Jose St. -27.03 -196.81 -27.69 -3 -2.13 128 Texas St. -27.69 -219.15 -29.24 2 11.88 129 New Mexico St. -28.53 -229.87 -30.32 -3 -3.56 130 Connecticut -30.97 -282.32 -34.52 -1 -1.56 Rankings by Conference AAC 22 Temple 12.68 101.93 13.46 31 UCF 11.78 54.26 10.52 45 Cincinnati 7.21 23.92 5.98 52 Houston 5.46 9.17 4.09 62 Tulane 1.42 -13.86 0.27 65 Memphis 0.10 -6.48 -0.25 68 South Florida -0.96 -19.56 -1.60 77 East Carolina -8.86 57.18 -3.09 83 Tulsa -4.57 -37.60 -4.90 105 SMU -11.53 -95.90 -12.40 108 Navy -11.59 -121.52 -13.70 130 Connecticut -30.97 -282.32 -34.52 ACC 2 Clemson 34.97 315.62 38.83 9 N.C. State 21.28 174.28 22.75 20 Miami (FL) 12.81 139.15 15.38 38 Duke 14.12 -15.76 8.64 43 Boston Coll. 8.14 20.40 6.43 44 Virginia 5.13 56.08 6.17 56 Syracuse 4.40 8.41 3.35 59 Georgia Tech 1.68 22.90 2.24 67 Virginia Tech 0.85 -39.40 -1.37 74 Pittsburgh -1.33 -28.83 -2.30 88 Florida St. -6.50 -41.94 -6.40 99 Wake Forest -9.66 -83.12 -10.53 106 North Carolina -19.35 6.43 -12.58 112 Louisville -15.62 -115.52 -16.09 B1G 3 Michigan 25.69 236.27 28.74 4 Penn St. 30.65 148.43 27.73 5 Ohio St. 25.91 187.61 26.50 17 Iowa 15.74 120.15 16.40 18 Wisconsin 14.83 129.85 16.27 30 Michigan St. 10.95 79.80 11.22 34 Purdue 7.74 91.82 9.67 35 Maryland 9.30 68.64 9.57 36 Minnesota 10.16 56.49 9.55 60 Northwestern 2.09 4.40 1.61 66 Nebraska -6.71 77.27 -0.68 76 Indiana -5.38 11.25 -3.04 115 Illinois -13.82 -178.36 -17.98 123 Rutgers -23.27 -173.16 -24.02 BXII-II 6 Oklahoma 25.55 160.32 24.91 23 Texas Tech 11.80 103.88 12.97 24 West Virginia 14.25 57.43 12.32 26 Texas 12.14 85.58 12.30 29 Iowa St. 10.85 89.90 11.65 39 TCU 5.18 104.35 8.59 46 Oklahoma St. 6.43 34.03 5.96 55 Baylor 2.52 34.52 3.38 69 Kansas St. 1.33 -51.93 -1.67 82 Kansas -1.59 -77.26 -4.86 CUSA 16 North Texas 15.93 120.40 16.54 48 UAB 2.75 63.82 4.97 58 Louisiana Tech 2.79 25.83 3.13 78 Marshall -3.03 -24.30 -3.22 80 Florida Atlantic -5.75 -13.88 -4.52 85 Southern Miss -9.30 21.11 -5.16 92 Florida Intl. -3.92 -95.99 -7.33 96 UNC-Charlotte -11.75 -31.89 -9.40 102 Middle Tenn. St. -11.22 -84.37 -11.63 111 West. Kentucky -16.66 -84.95 -15.28 117 Old Dominion -18.45 -151.84 -19.76 120 UTEP -22.20 -169.93 -23.15 122 UT-San Antonio -21.61 -184.59 -23.48 126 Rice -28.60 -171.32 -27.49 Indies 12 Army 19.39 97.35 17.71 19 Notre Dame 17.81 79.64 15.79 64 BYU 0.51 -11.84 -0.24 73 Liberty -1.70 -16.16 -1.93 119 Massachusetts -18.69 -204.50 -22.51 129 New Mexico St. -28.53 -229.87 -30.32 MAC 50 Buffalo 4.07 41.92 4.78 71 East. Michigan -1.63 -15.18 -1.84 75 W. Michigan -6.98 40.54 -2.66 81 Ball St. -4.19 -40.35 -4.78 84 Miami (OH) -5.37 -30.56 -5.09 89 Northern Illinois -4.59 -73.08 -6.65 93 Ohio -6.23 -82.53 -8.21 95 Toledo -6.37 -104.37 -9.38 97 Cent. Michigan -9.26 -65.86 -9.41 110 Akron -11.85 -148.08 -15.18 121 Bowling Green -26.38 -118.70 -23.42 124 Kent St. -23.26 -185.63 -24.63 MWC 28 Utah St. 17.39 1.97 11.69 32 Fresno St. 11.12 56.18 10.18 40 Boise St. 5.81 92.83 8.44 54 San Diego St. 4.94 11.34 3.85 79 Air Force -1.05 -63.81 -3.84 94 New Mexico -5.99 -86.33 -8.23 100 Wyoming -10.83 -78.76 -11.09 101 Hawaii -9.17 -101.35 -11.10 103 Nevada -12.87 -66.96 -11.87 104 Colorado St. -14.10 -52.52 -11.98 116 UNLV -17.01 -147.26 -18.58 127 San Jose St. -27.03 -196.81 -27.69 P12 21 Washington 13.93 106.53 14.53 25 Utah 13.61 65.94 12.31 33 Washington St. 6.18 122.83 10.16 37 Colorado 7.08 81.72 8.74 42 Arizona St. 7.82 29.47 6.66 47 USC 3.66 55.77 5.18 49 Stanford 9.26 -27.76 4.81 57 Oregon 3.29 21.53 3.25 61 UCLA 1.15 2.96 0.91 90 Arizona -10.89 6.89 -6.92 107 California -15.33 -49.27 -12.64 114 Oregon St. -19.94 -73.01 -16.88 SBC 8 Appalachian State 23.96 147.25 23.21 72 Arkansas St. -4.68 25.58 -1.86 87 Troy -6.80 -26.10 -5.82 91 Georgia Southern -1.83 -117.38 -6.99 98 LA Lafayette -10.75 -52.13 -9.73 109 Coastal Carolina -15.46 -80.97 -14.29 113 Georgia State -15.88 -121.29 -16.55 118 South Alabama -19.89 -158.76 -21.07 125 LA Monroe -24.99 -168.45 -24.94 128 Texas St. -27.69 -219.15 -29.24 SEC 1 Alabama 37.23 292.39 39.19 7 LSU 24.55 145.18 23.50 10 Georgia 21.14 126.18 20.30 11 Texas A&M 14.72 203.75 19.83 13 Kentucky 18.34 96.31 16.96 14 Florida 18.62 91.31 16.90 15 Mississippi St. 16.93 108.96 16.64 27 Missouri 10.35 106.18 12.12 41 South Carolina 7.60 59.55 7.99 51 Auburn 4.98 28.40 4.71 53 Mississippi 1.48 62.99 4.08 63 Vanderbilt 3.74 -48.10 0.13 70 Tennessee -2.52 -2.79 -1.82 86 Arkansas -9.64 12.59 -5.81
  48. 1 point
    In poker, as in NASCAR racing and the Kama Sutra, position is everything. This basic fact is often overlooked by less experienced poker players, who tend to make their betting decisions based on the strength of their two hole cards without considering their position in the hand. The relative value of your table position should be a primary factor in your decision to get involved in a particular hand from the outset. Position is determined by the betting order that will occur after the flop. If there are nine players at the table then the first three players are in “early” position, the next three are in “middle” position, and the final three are in “late” position. The player on the button has the strongest position for that hand. The blinds are in the weakest position, even though they bet last pre-flop. Remember, when considering position it is the order after the flop that matters. Why does it matter? One reason: because flops are hard to hit. The odds of improving your hand on the flop are roughly 1 in 3 – which means that (approximately) 2 out of 3 times you are going to miss the flop. And there’s where the problem lies. If you are in early position, and you miss the flop, you don’t have many good options for what to do next. If you check then you signal weakness and a late position player is likely to bet in order to get you to fold. If you bet out you might get some to fold, but a late position player who did hit the flop is likely to raise you and force your hand. Bottom line: it sucks to have to act first. If you get to act last, then you have the most information available to make your betting decision. So how do you incorporate this table position knowledge? By carefully choosing which hands to play at all. If you are in early position, you should only play premium hands (such as high pocket pairs or suited connectors with faces). In the later positions you can loosen up and play more hands, because from there you have a much greater possibility of winning the hand even if you don’t hit. Now, if you have great cards in early position you should still play them, and if you have junk cards in late position you should still throw them. But for all those hands in between those extremes, consider position when making your decision.
  49. 1 point
    So you’ve played Hold ‘Em in a weekly home game, and you’ve watched the WSOP on television, but now you’ve been invited to go play in a real casino and you’re not sure what to expect. Good thing you read my blog! First of all, you need to find the poker section of the casino. The poker area is generally separated off from the other floor games, often by actual glass walls. When you enter the room there is usually a front desk that has a computerized display behind it showing what games are being played. A game labeled “1/2 NO” would be a no-limit Texas Hold Em’ game in which the starting blinds are $1 and $2. All games are Texas Hold ‘Em unless they are otherwise labeled (such as “Hi Lo Omaha”). Sometimes there is immediate seating available, but often you will have to add your name to the waiting list and wait to be called. There should also be information at the desk regarding any upcoming tournaments. What should you play? Depends on what you’ve been playing in the home setting and what kind of play you are most interested in. As a Hold ‘Em player your options are: a limit cash game, a no limit cash game, or a tournament. Here are the basics for each option… LIMIT – a nice choice if the thought of losing all your money in one hand is too much for you to contemplate. The biggest temptation at limit is to play too many hands because the price is low. If you don’t limit your play to strong hands in good position, you will slowly give away all your money. Luck plays a bigger factor in limit poker than it does in no limit – you will have to get the cards to win. Expect to be drawn out on in this game. The betting limits make it impossible to push someone out of the pot if they want to see if they will hit their flush or straight. This can be frustrating when your high pocket pairs don’t hold up, but the flipside is that you, too, can draw to higher hands. You just have to understand the dynamic s of the game have shifted some. NO LIMIT – Be sure you know the minimum and maximum stack needed for joining the table (generally posted, or you should ask at the desk before you go get your chips). Pay attention to everything that occurs at the table, even when you are not in the hand. You will want to know everything you can about the tendencies of other players before you have to make a big decision against them. Use the same betting strategy every time you make a play so you aren’t giving clues to your hand based on how you bet. Players may try to intimidate newbies at these tables – keep calm and cool and use your knowledge to make the best decisions with the given information. TOURNAMENT – Nice because you know exactly how much money you are committing to the game in advance, and every other player is committing the same amount. Study the tournament structure beforehand (are there add-ons after the first round? Re-buys allowed? How fast do the blinds go up? What round do antes start?). The most important strategy point to remember is to not wait too long to make your move. If your stack has dwindled too much when you go all-in, you will not scare anyone out and have less chance of winning it and staying alive. Most pros also recommend establishing a tight reputation early while the blinds are low and then using that to steal blinds later when the return is much higher. Some FAQs… Are the drinks free? Depends. Non-alcoholic choices are almost always free, but you should still tip the waitress for bringing it (you can tip with either chips or cash). Free alcohol varies by the environment – in Vegas they are probably free, at a Native American casino they probably are not. It is not a stupid question to ask. Is the food free, and can I eat it at the table? Casinos vary in how they do their comps, but almost all comp in some manner while you are playing. Before you start playing, always get a player’s card and make sure the dealer swipes it right when you join the table. Often the casinos credit you a certain amount each half hour you are playing at a table. If you play for several hours and then want to go grab some food, you probably have some credit built up to help pay for it. Some casinos will give you free buffet tickets if you ask at the poker desk (you can also ask about room deals, etc. at the poker desk). Most casinos let you eat at the table (they like to keep you playing), some with actual food servers working the poker room and others where you go get your food and bring it back yourself. If you need to leave the table to eat or do something else, tell the dealer and they will place a box over your chips and give you time parameters (normally 45 minutes to an hour). If they are busy, they may allow someone to play in your spot on top of your chip box. Can I smoke at the table? No. Poker rooms are almost always smoke free, unlike that cloud of chemicals out on the general casino floor. Do I tip the dealer? You tip the dealer when you win a hand. As you rake in your chips, toss one (or two if it’s a big hand) over to the dealer. Technically tipping is not required, but you should always do it. Does the dealer want to hear my helpful suggestions? No. Also, don’t touch your cards until all are dealt, and don’t touch the button unless the dealer specifically tells you to. What is a “bad beat” jackpot? Many casinos build a running jackpot that pays out when somebody hits a “bad beat” hand. A bad beat basically means losing with a REALLY good hand. Different casinos define a bad beat differently, so be sure to ask where the line is. Some consider a bad beat losing with quads, some count losing with aces full of kings or higher, others will say it has to be quad sixes or higher. Be sure to know all the promotions that are running while you play (such as “Aces Cracked Wins a Rack” meaning you get $100 if you lose with pocket aces). There are times when a promotion will change your decision making process in certain hands. I’m sure I have forgotten all kinds of things, but those are some pointers to get you started. So go! Have Fun! Take me with you! And don’t take money that you can’t afford to lose – like most fun things, poker should be enjoyed responsibly in moderation.
  50. 1 point
    I received an email from OU sports that announced a presale starting July 25th at 12:01AM. Use code: OU2013 OU tickets
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